#1
I apologize if this has already been asked, but I cannot seem to find any information about it other than very old threads dating from a couple of years back. I recently came upon the KANJI Clinic articles and read a recommendation for Father Joseph De Roos "2001 Kanji."

I've been using Heisig on and off now for quite a while and am having a hard time with his stories. De Roo's stories seem to make more sense to me.

I'd be interested in getting a copy of the book for the stories (which I am not sure the Coscom editions include), which essentially brings me to where I can get a copy of this book. Does anyone know? It's out of print and I can't borrow it from the JLPT library in Yotsuya (I live in Tokyo).

I looked for a version on pirate bay, but couldn't dwnld it......
Does anyone have it on here?

Thank you again
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#2
As you know, it is out of print and vanishingly rare. It has no ISBN number, and from what I can gather, has low production values, rasembling the sort of handout teachers gave to students in the early 1980s.

You have probably thought of this, but your best bet might be to try an academic interloan. If you don't have access to a university library, you will have to make friends with someone who does. You could also write to the publisher; sometimes they have back copies lying around, but because it came out over thirty years ago I doubt that would ve of much use

I don't know who owns the rights to this work but given that De Roo has passed away, and has no descendants, it would be great if it could be put in the public domain either as an e-book or PDF.

Good luck

Edit: For those who are interested, I have linked to the reviiew Diana referenced below.
http://www.kanjiclinic.com/reviewderoo.htm
Edited: 2011-11-06, 6:40 am
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#3
Thanks again.

I just finished university, but have a friend who is studying at SOAS who looked for me. Even though open library says that SOAS should have a copy, it does not.
I don't know any university students here in Japan and I don't think writing the publisher would be much look. Perhaps writing to Mary would yield something?
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#4
Temple University Japan, where Roos worked at, supposedly has a copy on stack according to the online catalog. Since you can get into the library for free once, I have been considering going down to Tokyo here in a few weeks and maybe stopping by and looking at the book. At only 130 pages too, it wouldn't be outside the realm of possibilities to take pictures of each page.

I doubt contacting the publisher will yield much.
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#5
I managed to find out that the Japan foundation library has one copy in the reading room.
Of course, you can't check it out. And of course, this library isn't open on the weekends.
And of course, this library closes at 7 pm on a weekday. Arrgh!
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#6
Hello,
You can have a look to Joseph R. de Roo book here:
https://www.scribd.com/book/339521862/20...h-R-De-Roo

PS: I know the topic is old and it's bad to post old topics. I managed to buy the book this day, I took he time to scan it for the people who would be happy to have one electronic version at least. I thought it was stupid to open a new topic with the same title.
Edited: 2017-02-17, 2:53 pm
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#7
I find it ironic that the very first sentence in OP references "very old threads dating from a couple of years back."
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#8
Well, I for one was glad to have a chance to nab the book on Scribd, so thanks for the link.
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#9
Here is why Heisig's system is far superior to De Roo's:

De Roo lists 31 different writings for the grapheme "hand" (手, 又, etc.). Other component analysis systems, such as those of Heisig and Foerster/Tamura (see reviews on this web site), take a different approach: They assign different names to each of these various ways of writing a particular grapheme.
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#10
(2017-02-16, 7:44 pm)phil321 Wrote: Here is why Heisig's system is far superior to De Roo's:

De Roo lists 31 different writings for the grapheme "hand" (手, 又, etc.). Other component analysis systems, such as those of Heisig and Foerster/Tamura (see reviews on this web site), take a different approach: They assign different names to each of these various ways of writing a particular grapheme.

Agreed. I skimmed through the pdf and could not understand why anyone would find it easier to learn Kanji with De Roo instead of with Heisig. I guess everyone's different.
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#11
I have no intention of switching from Heisig, but I hoard books. I always enjoy seeing different approaches to teaching kanji.

Scanning back up the thread - breakies, are you the one who scanned the book and uploaded it to scribd? If so, double thanks! It is so important to preserve these old books, especially the ones that are so perishable that even libraries don't always keep a copy. I looked on ABE books and the only copy is currently going for $150, ouch.
Edited: 2017-02-17, 8:41 am
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#12
I bought on ebay US at an high price especially because transport prices (I live in France): I scanned and put on scribd it entirely this week. I have been always been frustrated not being able to find any elecronic version of this book, when you can find nearly all the japanese learning books still available on the market.
When it's an old and valuable book just impossible to find/afford, it's just too bad.

I may do a version with one page per page one day, but this was quickier scanning like this with my work material.

The method has its flaws, but its analysis has also its logic : from what I read, de Roo did not invent meanings to radical forms, he did history research to explain why this kanji with this sense is made of this sign and this sign.

"On the other hand, the Component Analysis method of teaching kanji
involves analyzing each kanji to be learned by breaking it down entirely
into components (Le., not simply pointing out the radical), attaching
meaning to each of these components, and then having learners
remember a story which ties the components together and calls to
mind the essential meaning of the kanji (De Roo, 1982). While the
stories of some Component Analysis materials are based partly on etymological
explanations or historical research on ancient Chinese life,
Heisig (1986) takes a more whimsical approach."

I think some stories he made are really nice to discover.
You can do something interesting stuff by mixing the two.
The goal remains the same: how to win your kanji goals, and we will probably have to find our way.

You have some copies on Amazon sites like here, but price starts generaly over 80$
https://www.amazon.co.uk/2001-kanji-Stru...eph+de+roo
Edited: 2017-02-17, 2:24 pm
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