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MEXT Scholarship 2012

#51
Given the amount of checks they ask for it seems like it can cost $500-1000... does everyone go down this route (I managed to get it done free out of lucky circumstance)? It really seems ridiculous...
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#52
It wasn't that expensive. I think mine cost $150-200 or so? I was able to avoid the chest X-ray. At least on the US form it was chest X-ray, blood work, and a regular checkup. That's not too bad.
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#53
On the form for where I applied, it was chest X ray, blood sample, urine samples, hearing test, eye test... maybe $500+ was an exaggeration but getting all these done seemed to cost several hundred pounds in the UK. |:

http://samedaydoctor.co.uk/prices.aspx Granted this is the only site I bothered checking but just the chest X-ray is £190. But that's good that you could avoid it.

Them asking for blood type was strange too. Just knowing O/A/B/AB/R+/R- isn't much good in practice... what do they want it for? Horoscopes? Oh well.
Edited: 2012-02-28, 1:25 pm
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JapanesePod101
#54
I just came back from the test and interview at the Japanese embassy here in Oslo.
The funny thing was - I was the only applicant! They had this big test room prepared and I was the only one sitting there.
I applied for the Japanese studies program (1 year), so I only had to do the Japanese test. It wasn't that hard (compared to JLPT N1), but I struggled with the advanced kanji writing section. I didn't know there was a production section, so that surprised me a lot!
After the two-hour long test I had 5 minutes to chill before the interview.
This was the hard part (but it was really fun!). It was conducted all in Japanese and it lasted for over one hour! It was my first interview in Japanese, and my longest interview ever.
But it went really well! They were impressed by my Japanese, so they were like "We were supposed to talk a bit in Norwegian and English as well, but since you already speak Japanese fluently, let's just continue in Japanese".
I think my odds are pretty good. I know there's no quota per country, but since I was the only applicant from Norway, at least there's no competition with other Norwegians.

I don't know where I read it, but I'm pretty sure I read somewhere on here that you should "suit up" before the test / exam. I actually didn't plan on wearing a suit, but after reading it on here I decided to suit up and boy... I'm SO glad I did! The five (!) Japanese people interviewing me were all wearing suits and the formality within the embassy was intense! Thank you guys so much for the heads up! Smile
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#55
@Zorlee

Yeah, the formality is insane.
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#56
I want to apply to the monbukagakusho scholarship this year. I only have 25 days left.

I want to apply to a masters in japanese language. Graduate school in Japan means doing research. What can one person research on languages? I seriously can't write anything because I just don't know what to write.
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#57
You'd have a supervisor who'd advise you about what to write.
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#58
Yes, but we need to write what we want to do research on.
I already wrote it and sent it to one of my japanese teachers.

Do you have any advices on japanese language and culture master degrees? In just a few words, I want to do research on japanese business culture and compare it with the portuguese one.
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#59
Oh, sorry, I misread your post, I thought you meant you were worried about doing the actual research.

I'm sure you're much more of an expert than me in language and culture, so I advise just to write what you want to do in as much detail as possible (just under a page should be okay).

But wasn't the MEXT deadline back in January or February? :S Maybe that was just for university recommendation, are you applying for the embassy recommendation? I'm not sure how it works exactly...
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#60
Is there anyone on here that has done the embassy recommendation route for the Research Student MEXT?
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#61
I'm in Japan on that fellowship right now. We got our stipends cut by 1man for this year. Sad
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#62
It use to be 160,000yen?

To clarify, you went the embassy recommendation route yudantaiteki? Did you apply through a US embassy?

I'm trying to figure out the timeline for application process. I'm going to have most of July and August off and have been pondering going home and applying through the embassy. If the testing + interview don't happen in July/August though then it'll be impossible.

So whats it like?
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#63
Here's a blog post I wrote for a blog about it:
http://shinpaideshou.wordpress.com/2011/...holarship/

I don't really know the details of the process outside my experience, but you have to make sure you get the date of the application from the specific consulate you'll be applying through because they can differ by a few days or a week. I almost didn't get to apply because I assumed the Chicago and Detroit embassies had the same date.
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#64
yudantaiteki Wrote:Here's a blog post I wrote for a blog about it:
http://shinpaideshou.wordpress.com/2011/...holarship/

I don't really know the details of the process outside my experience, but you have to make sure you get the date of the application from the specific consulate you'll be applying through because they can differ by a few days or a week. I almost didn't get to apply because I assumed the Chicago and Detroit embassies had the same date.
I looked over it and its got a bit of useful info thanks.

Though it didn't mention timeline. I assume most embassies take in MEXT apps around July (give or take a few weeks). Starting from the deadline, how long did you wait till the interview? That's really my leading question at the moment.
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#65
I don't remember, sorry. This was two years ago Sad
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#66
yudantaiteki Wrote:I don't remember, sorry. This was two years ago Sad
Dang, oh well. Hopefully the embassy replies to me (truthfully). I emailed them asking about it. If that doesn't work out then I'll just try university recommendation route I suppose.
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#67
Well they got back to me on my email and it looks good. The deadline is set so they have about 2 weeks to review applications and then make a decision on interview/testing. Which means it'll be around August 6th for interviews, right where I need it.

I have a question for you though yudantaiteki. Did you or do do you think its worth avoiding saying you have an interest in studying in Japan? I mean its one thing to say "I can only study in Japan because this specific program is pretty unique and really only in Japan." VS "Some of the work this professor does is interesting and close to my interest, but its not required to study in Japan; there are some comparable programs in the US as well, but I like Japan > US." Wouldn't put it in quite those words, but I think you get the point. My area of study/interest is computational neuroscience/machine learning, which are not "japanese culture" specific so its not like I can go in saying "Well, Comp. Neurosci. only exists in Japan (like Japanese linguistics) so its kind of obvious to study in Japan."

Others have told me that non-JP culture/langauge stuff get accepted all the time, but I'm curious on your take on it and whether the interview question strayed into that territory ("Why Japan?")?
Edited: 2012-05-30, 11:24 pm
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#68
It never did -- my field is classical Japanese literature so there was a much stronger assumption that going to Japan was necessary. I did need to give some explanation of what I would be able to do in Japan that I couldn't do in the US, but it wasn't a question of my entire field having nothing inherently related to Japan.

Personally I would recommend against saying you don't really need to go to Japan. You're asking the JP government to pay you to study in Japan; don't go out of your way to give them a reason to turn you down.
Edited: 2012-05-31, 3:23 am
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#69
Just say that Japanese research in your field is strong and mention that you've always had an interest in Japan itself. Good luck.

Machine learning seems interesting. Do you have a favourite book on the subject? I do a lot of probability and statistics myself.

yudanteki, you're doing a PhD there right? Did you do 修士 there first? How did funding work out for you?
Edited: 2012-05-31, 4:25 am
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#70
dizmox Wrote:yudanteki, you're doing a PhD there right? Did you do 修士 there first? How did funding work out for you? Do people ever switch universities between 修士 and 博士 programs?
I'm not doing my PhD at a Japanese university, I'm just here as a research student.
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#71
Oh whoops, nevermind then.
Edited: 2012-05-31, 4:17 am
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#72
dizmox Wrote:Just say that Japanese research in your field is strong and mention that you've always had an interest in Japan itself. Good luck.

Machine learning seems interesting. Do you have a favourite book on the subject? I do a lot of probability and statistics myself.
Well I've lived and worked in Japan for about 2 years total now so it probably should be a bit of a given I like Japan, to the interviewers, haha. I just don't know if "resilient to culture shock" is something they look for in the same way that JET or other companies do when hiring people to come to Japan.

I actually have little in the way formal comp sci. background which is going to play against me in the interview probably. Computers are my thing though and I like problem solving and using computers to do it. I just didn't realize this till about a year before I was finishing undergrad in Psychology, sigh. I had started prepping for this potential track though by taking math (calc 1 and 2, and sitting in on calc in 3D+) before graduating. I didn't even need the classes really.

And
@yudantaiteki: Ya I don't plan to run around and shoot my self in the foot in the process. I just have a lot riding against me in what I want to do and I'm pretty intimidated by it all, honestly (Changing from humanities to math heavy science with no background).
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#73
I think it's cool you're trying to pursue it. If you get the interview you could do have a look at some textbooks to prepare I suppose? For the computational neuroscience I think you just need to know a bit about differential equations and basic probability theory, which tends to be covered in the appendix of most introductory books anyway.

I often found myself thinking of crossing over to different fields, eg. quantum physics/computing, computational (bio)chemistry, computational neuroscience. When I actually get down to trying them however, I end up losing interest quickly since I have no alternative except to learn in isolation from textbooks, which isn't much fun. Nowadays I think I've learnt to stick to learning things that are of present utility or things I can actually fully enjoy doing on my own (eg. game development).

EDIT: I ordered this today to study in the summer, looks pretty fun. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Artificial-Intel...579&sr=8-1.
Edited: 2012-06-03, 2:58 pm
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#74
yudantaiteki: I wanted to ask. Have you ever ran into any other MEXT recipients? Or anyone else for that matter. It seems difficult to find people that have been through the process and received it.
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#75
vix86 Wrote:yudantaiteki: I wanted to ask. Have you ever ran into any other MEXT recipients? Or anyone else for that matter. It seems difficult to find people that have been through the process and received it.
I know people here who are MEXT recipients. Most are not from the US, though, so their experiences would differ.
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