Back

List of Free Audiobooks

#51
I think her voice is a bit too annoying and the content is boring. Have you checked the audiobooks from the first topic?
Reply
#52
mentat_kgs Wrote:I think her voice is a bit too annoying and the content is boring. Have you checked the audiobooks from the first topic?
Thanks for your post. Well, yes, I have checked some of the audiobooks. The problem is that I'm a beginner when it comes to sentences and listening practice. I've reached frame #1100 in RTK1 and that's about all "Japanese" I know. So maybe those audiobooks are too hard for me? That "boring content" looked a lot easier, and they have also got vocabulary lists for the texts.
Edited: 2009-03-12, 11:00 am
Reply
#53
Well, it would be better to create another thread for this.
I'm naming it "graded material X natural material".
Reply
Thanksgiving Sale: 30% OFF Basic, Premium & Premium PLUS Subscriptions! (Nov 13 - 22)
JapanesePod101
#54
I grabbed The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde but the numbers don't seem to be in any reasonable order. I'm more a than a bit confused, can anyone help?
Reply
#55
Kudos to Pauline for creating the corresponding Audiobooks page over at the RevTK Wiki, and many thanks again to sheetz for putting the list together!

Let's update the wiki page from now on.

PS: Edited 1st post with this:

This page is now availble on the RevTK Wiki: Audiobooks.
Reply
#56
Here's a different way of obtaining "Audio Books".

1. Take favorite drama and rip the audio.
2. Put audio on iPod
3. Find favorite drama's scipt on dramanote.
4. Print out dramanote script.
5. Read along with dramanote script to your favorite drama.
6. ?????
7. Profit

I've been doing this recently and found it very enjoyable. It's been useful for dramas that don't have subtitles (readily available) yet have a dramanote script. Examples (for me) include

Change
Tiger and Dragon
Nodame Cantabile
Galileo

Earlier this year, during combat training, I just read the script to a lot of dramas. However, this seems to beat just reading both in terms of pleasure and learning. Only downside are incomplete scripts.

PS: One can also print out subtitles and do the same thing. Obviously limited to text based subtitles.
Reply
#57
Can anyone suggest some of the "easiest" stories out of this huge list?
Reply
#58
@Nukemarine Do you have any of the four above ripped and ready to go that we could get?
Reply
#59
zazen666 Wrote:@Nukemarine Do you have any of the four above ripped and ready to go that we could get?
Although I have the audio ripped, there's no way I can upload them. My internet connection in Africa is horrible on the best of days. Just syncing Anki can be a work in frustration.

Still, if you have the videos (from whatever source) and Audacity, then ripping them yourself should be no problem. Besides, it's more fun to read along if it's a show you've seen once or a few times.
Reply
#60
Zarxrax Wrote:Can anyone suggest some of the "easiest" stories out of this huge list?
Try the fairy tales. Some are easier than others, but you can generally tell by how many kanji are on the page, and maybe by how long they are.
Reply
#61
http://hukumusume.com/douwa/

Kid stories.

You can watch here: http://hukumusume.com/douwa/amime/index.html

You can listen here: http://hukumusume.com/douwa/koe/index.html
Edited: 2010-02-19, 2:21 am
Reply
#62
Smackle Wrote:http://hukumusume.com/douwa/

Kid stories.

You can watch here: http://hukumusume.com/douwa/amime/index.html

You can listen here: http://hukumusume.com/douwa/koe/index.html
Wow, thanks for the link. The audio is awesome.
ありがとう~
Reply
#63
Hey guys

These audiobooks are great, since Japanese listening is my weakest point.

However, is there any way to get these audio files on your ipod?

Or, do you know of any podcast apart from Japanese Listening Advanced http://www.voiceblog.jp/japaneselistening/ that comes with a reliable transcript&translation?

Cheers!

Ella
Reply
#64
Ella Niamh Wrote:These audiobooks are great, since Japanese listening is my weakest point.
I´m wondering if it´s actually possible for your listening ability to be significantly lower than your speaking ability.
Reply
#65
Well, okay then, my speaking is not the greatest either (though I'm going on exchange in a month, so that will change!) But it's definitely possible for speaking to be good while listening is bad. For example, I got a HD for my speaking test last term, but failed listening.

I find language listening harder because it demands instant comprehension. You can't 'rewind' someone who you're talking to because you missed a word they just said. It's not like with Japanese reading where you can sit down with a dictionary for a few hours and work it out at your own pace.
Reply
#66
Here's another site w/ solid (female) audio from what I've listened to: http://jclab.wordpress.com/ - Each entry seems to have both with/without music.

Found this via that Librivox site whilst searching for Japanese texts (they only have 4, and I believe they're all from the above site?) -- Wonder if there's a project like Librivox in Japan...
Edited: 2010-03-31, 7:37 pm
Reply
#67
nest0r Wrote:-- Wonder if there's a project like Librivox in Japan...
This is Japan's version of LIbrivox

http://www.koetaba.net/3book/index.html

I'm glad it seems people are actually using those links I provided. I recently came across this page http://mastarpj.nict.go.jp/~mutiyama/ali...-pages.htm which has a long list of parallel bilingual texts, some of which have audio available from the above list, but what's great is that the same texts are available in interlaced format here, which really makes it perfect for following along as you listen to the audio.

Try it out with this Miyazawa Kenji story and tell me what you guys think:

audio: http://fantajikan.tea-nifty.com/blog/200..._76ca.html
bilingual text: http://mastarpj.nict.go.jp/~mutiyama/ali...ildcat.alm

I've found using bilingual interlaced texts so much more useful than the usual side by side format that I intend to create them for other audiobooks. Anyone up for a group project? I don't mind doing them myself but it'll take forever for just one person. Especially if you want to do something like Harry Potter.
Edited: 2010-04-09, 2:31 am
Reply
#68
Have you already seen balloonguy's interactive audio tool? I was telling them that I wouldn't mind having parallel text, but then I realized it would be troublesome because as I think you'd agree, there are other ways to integrate. Personally my main goal is to keep the blocks of text looking just as they would 'raw', so I wouldn't be happy with 'interlaced' J/E that way.

More like, since balloonguy's tool uses Firefox, perhaps we could do something like Google has for translations, where the original (or in this case translation) shows like a tooltip over designated areas. Though I'd want this to be hotkey activated or something because there'd be a lot of hovering and clicking for the interactive audio stuff. In fact, with those texts already done, I bet it wouldn't be too hard to find a way to do such a thing...

See threads '.cue sheets for video' and 'tool for interactive... ' for more. Or: http://forum.koohii.com/showthread.php?p...8#pid96258 - My main goal, as mentioned in the 'totally innocent books' thread, at the moment is to simply get more interactive audio texts made, though obviously 'interlacing' in some fashion with translations could be a part of that process. 'My friend' is going to be working on two totally innocent 'shadow bound' book projects first, before working on public domain stuff... also, personally I'm only interested in going for breadth rather than depth, that is to say, many swaths of text (or many sets of several pages, etc.) rather than entire books.

Also keep in mind we can now use RhinoSpike to get native audio with pretty much any text, within reason, no?
Edited: 2010-04-09, 2:48 am
Reply
#69
Wow, so many goodies and so many threads that I've somehow missed. I hope someone who isn't overly burdened with work and knowledgeable about this stuff could one day write a simple Nukemarine-style beginner's guide to all these resources.

I suppose I could just read all the threads from the beginning and figure it out myself. Wink
Reply
#70
Nestor, I think the matter of bilingual texts with balloonguy's audio program will certainly be a matter of personal preference, which is why I solicited feedback from others. Personally I prefer the interlaced texts, although I can certainly see the usefulness of using just the raw Japanese versions.

As for Rhinospike, I have hesitations about using that because audiobooks recited by professional voice actors are lightyears better than what you'd get from your typical native speaker and the quality of the recordings really makes a huge difference in their overall usability. Some audiobooks, like the ones on fantajikan, are a pleasure to listen to, while some of the ones at the koetaba site are like listening to nails on a chalkboard.
Edited: 2010-04-09, 3:36 am
Reply
#71
I have one to add:

http://jclab.wordpress.com - Japanese Classic Literature at Bedtime (audio and transcripts)

This is a lady who reads classic literature in a very soft and pleasant voice. She sells the audiobook readings in Japan, but they are free here in the US. They are all classics. There are bits of Genji, The Pillow Book and alot of other smaller short stories. If you add her RSS to a podcaster, you'll only get about half her archive. I spent an hour one day downloading her entire run. Lovely listening. I don't understand about 90% of it because of where I am in my learning, but immersion can only help, right?

astrangerhere
Reply
#72
@astrangerhere, that's awesome! Thanks for the link!
Reply
#73
@astrangerhere that's a fantastic resource, good find! I found that random volume increases in some other audiobooks woke me up in the night - I'm hopeful that this lady's soft voice will be better for night-time listening.
Reply
#74
I posted that same link just above here on this same page: http://forum.koohii.com/showthread.php?p...4#pid95214 - $90 please.
Edited: 2010-04-23, 7:06 am
Reply
#75
sheetz Wrote:
nest0r Wrote:-- Wonder if there's a project like Librivox in Japan...
This is Japan's version of LIbrivox

http://www.koetaba.net/3book/index.html

I'm glad it seems people are actually using those links I provided. I recently came across this page http://mastarpj.nict.go.jp/~mutiyama/ali...-pages.htm which has a long list of parallel bilingual texts, some of which have audio available from the above list, but what's great is that the same texts are available in interlaced format here, which really makes it perfect for following along as you listen to the audio.

Try it out with this Miyazawa Kenji story and tell me what you guys think:

audio: http://fantajikan.tea-nifty.com/blog/200..._76ca.html
bilingual text: http://mastarpj.nict.go.jp/~mutiyama/ali...ildcat.alm

I've found using bilingual interlaced texts so much more useful than the usual side by side format that I intend to create them for other audiobooks. Anyone up for a group project? I don't mind doing them myself but it'll take forever for just one person. Especially if you want to do something like Harry Potter.
This is very strange. Anyone able to tell me why all of the Japanese text comes up as gibberish for me?
Reply