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Users study methods

In the beginning I made attempt to learn some vocabulary, but this was to be pretty useless idea, because Japanese language has no spaces and also use enormous amounts of untypical conjugations and synonyms, sometimes it is written in phonetic form sometimes in kana, so just too much to learn even for minimal understanding. also text is loitered with random letters  like yo, ne, ze, n.
basically you need to know phonetic and symbolic version of each word and be capable to extract that known word from pack of complete gibberish.

Instead of bothering with vocabulary I switched to learning grammar while vocabulary was left for a computer to deal with.
it is impossible to read manga without computer assistance anyway, but knowledge of grammar really helps to recover corrupted text or guess its meaning, so i would recommend same approach top others too.

Gradually I learned some words naturally by reading manga. Sometimes I can just guess kanji meaning from surrounding hiragana.
funny enough, I mostly learn various obscure words and just can remember those that are used very often.
lots of time I seem to know the word but I don't know its meaning.
In any case vocabulary is growing by itself while I simply read Japanese manga  and do not actively study Japanese.
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In short random bursts:
Study lots of vocab/grammar points.
Read a lot and hopefully run into stuff I studied, thereby reinforcing them in my mind.
Repeat.

Maybe it's not the most efficient or time effective due to lack of real structure, but I feel like it is a more natural learning method.
I would much rather do it this way than do what I see a lot of other people do: memorize each kanji's onyomi/kunyomi and then hope they somehow magically know how to pronounce long compound words.
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Hi, I need some help settling on a study plan moving forward.

---Background:

I studied Japanese for about 3.5 years, at first casually and for a college class but getting a lot more dedicated during the last 2 years. Afterward, I spent 2 months in Japan and afterward lost motivation to continue SRS. Afterward, I stopped all direct studying (besides texting a few people in Japanese and having phone set to Japanese) for about 7-8 months and now I've been looking to start again. My main goal right now is to pass the JLPT N1 this July.
---

I'm still trying to get back into the habit of doing Anki decks daily, but I was reading some threads here and think I might not be using my SRS time optimally. Before, I was doing the Core 2k/6k deck with the English word and the cloze-deleted sentence in front and the answer on the back as well as a straight Japanese vocab on front and meaning and reading on back.

I never tried learning kanji on their own, only by memorizing words and their readings. I never counted, but I'll estimate that I loosely know at least 1400 kanji (I think I knew more before I took a break from studying). I don't always know the right reading and specific meanings though. I don't really want to do RTK, because I'm not a fan of the mnemonic system and I feel like I can remember arbitrary stuff without it pretty easily. But I found this "All in One Kanji" deck: https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/798002504.

For the short term goal of passing the JLPT N1, should I even bother with learning lone kanji or just continue learning lot's of 音読み compounds?

I know recognition is more important, especially for the JLPT, but my Core 6k has only about 1000 more unseen cards left. But I've been using it as-is, with the English meaning and cloze-deleted sentence on front. I want to finish this deck since I spent a ton of time on it, but should I switch to having the full sentence in front and meaning, audio, and readings on the back?

I also ordered 2 books: 日本語総まとめN1Vocab book and Kanzen master grammar. I still haven't received the grammar one yet, but how do you guys work through these books? Making cards from sentence examples and vocab?

Do you put all your cards from textbooks and random words you find into 1 deck or do you use separate decks?

Also, I'd rather not do any more than 2 hours of SRS a day. I want to read and listen, but my vocab has taken a huge hit since my study hiatus. When reading, do you add every word you don't know to your SRS and go slow, or skip loads of words you don't know and try to get the general jist of the story.

In general, I just want to make sure I use my SRS time efficiently with the 2 hours per day that I can allocate to it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated Smile
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If your primary goal is to pass N1 then I would agree that studying individual kanji is not going to be very useful towards that goal and you can find more efficient things to do with your SRS time. What I would suggest you do to start with is get hold of a mock N1 test and do it (including keeping to the time limit). That will tell you what kinds of question the test is asking and give you an idea of what areas you're weak on and where you're already doing OK. Then you can bias your SRS time towards improving your weak points rather than spending a lot of time getting better in the areas you're already good enough to pass the test.
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