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Essential Resources

#26
yukamina Wrote:I don't think it's been mentioned, but I like this site a lot http://www.tanos.co.uk/jlpt/
It has vocab for all JLPT levels and grammar for JLPT 1 and 2. It can be pretty tough to find more advanced grammar online, so this is good ^_^
Hmm.. As long as you steer clear of those sound files... What is it, an Indian accent?
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#27
Serge Wrote:
yukamina Wrote:I don't think it's been mentioned, but I like this site a lot http://www.tanos.co.uk/jlpt/
It has vocab for all JLPT levels and grammar for JLPT 1 and 2. It can be pretty tough to find more advanced grammar online, so this is good ^_^
Hmm.. As long as you steer clear of those sound files... What is it, an Indian accent?
Hah, I never listened to the sound files...
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#28
I found this website: http://www.speedanki.com

The great thing is that it has simple example sentences for each of the words that are presented. The vocab is sorted according to JLPT level. The only downside is that not all of the JLPT vocab is there.
Edited: 2007-11-06, 5:55 pm
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JapanesePod101
#29
Note that Japanese For Everyone and Minna No Nihongo aren't the same texts.
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#30
Kangoroo is a nice dictionary app that's quite portable (Windows, Linux, Mac). I use it on my Zaurus (SL-C3200) hand-held.

It's located at http://www-alg.ist.hokudai.ac.jp/~jan/kangoroo.html .

It uses Jim Breen's EDICT dictionary file.

It has a natural interface to keep track of new words -- you look up a word as you would in any other dictionary, and then mark it with a single click. It keeps these words in a learnfile -- which is just a text-file, meaning other tools can easily parse it and use it.

What I do is take my Zaurus whenever I go out and note every unknown Japanese word I come across while studying. When I come home, I move the learn-file across to my desktop, where I parse it and bulk import it into Anki. That way, I get words into my review set as soon as possible with a small amount of effort (obviously, you have to spend a bit of time on the word, but that's a different story). It's also a good way to make sure I don't miss any important words.

Whenever I'm learning at home, I just use it on the desktop -- it's virtually identical across all environments.

If anyone is interested in the scripts, or more info, throw me a message.

I haven't seen it mentioned on these forums, so I thought I'd give it a plug. Apologies if I've missed something.

Misha
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#31
The link to the grammar page under yorkii's name in the first post seems to be broken.

Most of the resources on this thread are online but I thought I'd add a few offline ones if that's ok.

A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar
A Dictionary of Intermediate Japanese Grammar

Both of the above are excellently written and very good reference materials. Authoritative.

常用字解

The above is written by Shirakawa Shizuka, who I am told was accepted in both China and Japan as one of the world's premier authorities on kanji. Even his name, 白川静, sounds too beautiful to be true. Unfortunately he died two years ago at the age of 96. The book was written to be read by Japanese high school students so this is for intermediate students of Japanese and above. If you're looking for the true meaning of each kanji as it stands individually, then this book is one of the best places to start. It's a reference book, where the kanji are ordered by their principal on-yomi reading. Wonderful to pick up when you suddenly get curious about a particular kanji and it's origins.

Kenkyusha Online Dectionary

This online service costs money but it's the highest quality Japanese->English dictionary that I've found. I said quite a lot about it in one of the other threads but the crucial point is that the example sentences and phrases contained within it are written by Japanese people. All translations go through a very thorough process.
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#32
For those in the US who want to save on shipping (because Amazon.co.jp shipping to the US is totally brutal these days), here are yesasia.com's links for a couple of these books:

They have A Dictionary of Intermediate Japanese Grammar for a bit cheaper than Amazon:
http://us.yesasia.com/en/PrdDept.aspx/co...003921715/

Here's a link to the Shirakawa Shizuka book:
http://us.yesasia.com/en/PrdDept.aspx/co...003547302/

I just did a search for both books based on their ISBN.

Another link I'll recommend for finding books for the cheapest is:
http://www.addall.com
It searches across a bunch of different online book stores for the best price, including shipping, and you can search by ISBN as well.
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#33
My essential resource is the Kanji Stroke Order font:
http://www.users.waitrose.com/~potato/ (screenshot)
http://www.users.waitrose.com/~potato/Ka...Orders.zip

It's a computer font that shows the stroke order of the kanji (and also kana, roman letters and numbers). It's fast and easy to use - for example, you can copy and paste any number of characters in a word processor and select the font in big sizes to check the stroke order.
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#34
yea, the URL has changed on that one. if you could update it to: http://www.nihongo2.com/dictionary/index.cgi

yorks
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#35
If you want to watch Japanese movies, anime, music videos or television dramas, there's a ton of free stuff at http://www.crunchyroll.com It's great for the beginner because everything has english subtitles, but for the advanced student you can ignore them. The site is dedicated to Asian media, so students of Chinese and Korean will find it of interest as well.
Edited: 2008-01-21, 12:33 pm
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#36
timcampbell Wrote:If you want to watch Japanese movies, anime, music videos or television dramas, there's a ton of free stuff at http://www.crunchyroll.com It's great for the beginner because everything has english subtitles, but for the advanced student you can ignore them. The site is dedicated to Asian media, so students of Chinese and Korean will find it of interest as well.
Good website. Thanks!

I like a lot Nico Nico Douga, it is like the japanese youtube. You must be registered to watch videos and have interesting stuff.
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#37
Pcsl88 Wrote:I like a lot Nico Nico Douga, it is like the japanese youtube. You must be registered to watch videos and have interesting stuff.
Seconded. ニコニコ動画 is really fun. A nice thing is that you can put comments in the video; the others will see them at the same point during playback. Interesting to watch.
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#38
gdaxeman Wrote:My essential resource is the Kanji Stroke Order font:
http://www.users.waitrose.com/~potato/
It's a computer font that shows the stroke order of the kanji (and also kana, roman letters and numbers).
I use this font, too, but beware. There are a whole bunch of mistakes in this font even for just the Rtk1 kanji.
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#39
xaarg Wrote:I use this font, too, but beware. There are a whole bunch of mistakes in this font even for just the Rtk1 kanji.
have you been keeping notes? I've been using it for a couple of weeks and have noticed a couple of errors which I'll be reporting so they can be fixed. if you've already got a list, please share. thanks
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#40
I know these books get a lot of criticisms for their use of romaji, not having much vocab and for being a bit old, but I think Mari Noda and Eleanor Harz Jorden's Japanese: The Spoken Language (Volumes 1, 2 and 3) are wonderfully thorough and effective when it comes to learning grammar used in spoken Japanese (both in the sense that you can analyze it and use it naturally) , particularly if you follow the method the whole way through but also if you use it as a grammar reference (though lessons build upon each other, so sometimes you do have to look back for explanations). The accompanying sound files can be downloaded for free at Ohio State's language lab website. Even if you don't get the books, the drills in each lesson can be useful.

As for both A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar and A Dictionary of Intermediate Japanese Grammar, if you're possibly going to Japan anytime soon, wait until you get there to buy them. The first one in particular in much cheaper there.
Edited: 2008-01-28, 12:29 am
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#41
how are people using jpod, it at all?
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#42
I used to listen to the the audio blog (it comes with transcripts which is nice). Everything else I found to have too much English. Unfortunately the audio blogs are all fairly short...
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#43
I listen to them all. Even something called "Newbie" is going to have a native speaker demonstrating pronunciation. And Peter, which if you're in a similar mood to him at the time, is fun and will frequently get "off topic" and cover some non-newbie vocab or culture or whatever, so you can't always just rule out the classes by level. I do want more Japanese, for a more immersion sort of deal, and so I've got other podcasts and audiobooks that I've downloaded. EnglishPod101 takes it from the other side, teaching English to Japanese speakers. As such, the ration of English to Japanese is much different.

BTW, the audio blog is going to be expanding from about 2 minutes to about 10+ minutes, all Japanese.
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#44
xaarg Wrote:
gdaxeman Wrote:My essential resource is the Kanji Stroke Order font:
http://www.users.waitrose.com/~potato/
It's a computer font that shows the stroke order of the kanji (and also kana, roman letters and numbers).
I use this font, too, but beware. There are a whole bunch of mistakes in this font even for just the Rtk1 kanji.
if you send errors to the maintainer (mail[at]nihilist.org.uk) he'll fix them in the next version of the font and let you know when it's released
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#45
cangy Wrote:if you send errors to the maintainer (mail[at]nihilist.org.uk) he'll fix them in the next version of the font and let you know when it's released
Sounds nice. I will try it the next time I spot an error.
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#46
Hello, world!

Long time no see... Smile I'm here for a shameless plug: I've written my very first Palm software, called "Palm TaCo". It allows you to search the Tanaka Corpus phrases on your Palm device. I believe it's a good source of Japanese material, and best of all, it's free! You can get more information about it here: http://palmtaco.sourceforge.net/

[]s!
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#47
a great site is http://www.yookoso.com this site is aimed for everyone but especially for yookoso textbook readers, has all the grammar from the book online as well as the kanji organized by chapter AND animated gifs to show how its drawn.
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#48
Okonomiyaki Wrote:I know these books get a lot of criticisms for their use of romaji, not having much vocab and for being a bit old, but I think Mari Noda and Eleanor Harz Jorden's Japanese: The Spoken Language (Volumes 1, 2 and 3) are wonderfully thorough and effective when it comes to learning grammar used in spoken Japanese (both in the sense that you can analyze it and use it naturally) , particularly if you follow the method the whole way through but also if you use it as a grammar reference (though lessons build upon each other, so sometimes you do have to look back for explanations). The accompanying sound files can be downloaded for free at Ohio State's language lab website. Even if you don't get the books, the drills in each lesson can be useful.
I just tried to download these files but the mp3s are not available. Does anyone have them and want to share them?
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#49
The link for Anki is incorrect or out of date. The current URL is: http://ichi2.net/anki/
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#50
Just thought I'd throw up this list of podcasts and audio sites. I made this post for the sentences forum at http://ajatt.pseudosphere.net/index.php so give it some love too.

So if you need some audio to go with your one million sentences, here are some sites. I don't really remember what's on them all, just see what you like.

http://oda999.tea-nifty.com/kokoro/

A Japanese Voiceblog portal.
http://www.voiceblog.jp/

Advanced Japanese listening.
http://www.voiceblog.jp/japaneselistening/

The Breaking into Japanese Literature book's audio of the stories. For example, Rashomon etc.
http://www.speaking-japanese.com/breaking/index.html

Japanese Classical Literature at Bedtime.
http://eloise.cocolog-nifty.com/rodoku/

Japanese Lessons.
http://learn-japanese.podomatic.com/

Bakusho Mondai's JUNK comedy podcasts.
http://www.tbsradio.jp/bakusho/rss.xml

Stories with scripts.
http://learnjapanese.cocolog-nifty.com/blog/

More Lessons.
http://japancast.net/category/podcasts/

More Lessons again.
http://learnjapanesepod.com/newsite/inde...&Itemid=41

Annoying lessons here.
http://www.japanesepod101.com/category/b...r-lessons/

Video Lessons.
http://www.kjls.or.jp/podcast/classes/le...ssons.html

Stories with scripts again.
http://www.njuku.com/

Nippon voiceblog, great themed articles with scripts, about Japanese stuff.
http://www.voiceblog.jp/nippon/

Old Japanese stories and songs.
http://www.geocities.co.jp/HeartLand-Gaien/7211/

Streaming Japanese Radio Stations.
http://www.radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/nat...x=7&go.y=4

NHK Podcasts.
http://www.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/english/ra...index.html

TBS culture podcasts.
http://www.tbsradio.jp/life/

Good Job podcasts.
http://www.news24.jp/podCast/rss_jobdiscovery.xml

That's it.
Edited: 2008-09-10, 3:26 am
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