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The "What's this word/phrase?" thread

#26
lanval Wrote:I found another word for husband: うちの人. GODS japanese have many words for that. What is that one used for? I have so many husbands-cards in Anki, I need to name them somehow..
粗大ゴミ is another word for husband I hear.
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#27
particularly retired ones...also referred to as wet leaves =]
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#28
「手はなしちゃダメよ!」
I'm having difficulty figuring out the conjugation used here, and can't figure out the verb.
It means something like "Don't let go!"

Thanks for all the help Smile
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#29
放す = let go/set free
ちゃ = ては
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#30
Zarxrax Wrote:「手はなしちゃダメよ!」
I'm having difficulty figuring out the conjugation used here, and can't figure out the verb.
It means something like "Don't let go!"

Thanks for all the help Smile
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_gr...F_onbin.29 Scrolling down to 'colloquial contractions' will help you a lot in the future. There's a lot more than what's listed there, though...
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#31
Can anyone tell me the significance of と after 起こる is in this following sentence? Thanks.

厄年に悪いことがよく起こると、昔から多くの日本人は信じています。
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#32
It's connected to 信じる. It's the quoting particle.
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#33
anyone know if this kanji is used very frequently? Or more specifically fro this word?
贅沢 ぜいたく sorry for the small text
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#34
cloudstrife543 Wrote:anyone know if this kanji is used very frequently? Or more specifically fro this word?
贅沢 ぜいたく sorry for the small text
Yes, "贅沢" is the proper way to write it. Due to sheer laziness you'll sometimes see people just write it as ぜい沢 though. 贅沢 is definitely a common word, but the kanji itself is rare, and I can only think of many two or three words that use it. 贅言 isn't too rare, nor is 贅沢品. Coincidentally I actually used '贅沢三昧' just a few days ago Tongue other than those four words I can't think of any other words that use the character, but I am sure you could find more if you did some dictionary-digging.

Actually, one of the reasons that some people just use hiragana for the first character is that since it's not too commonly used they often forget some of the strokes. But still, 贅沢 looks much more proper to me, and no one will have trouble reading it.
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#35
ある友達は飼っていた犬に死なれました。

Does this sound like 'the friend i had was killed by a dog that he once owned?'

I'm guessing it means a dog he had died, but could someone help me to understand it better? Cuz usually the ni in passive sentences is kind of translated to 'by' usually.
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#36
cloudstrife543 Wrote:ある友達は飼っていた犬に死なれました。

Does this sound like 'the friend i had was killed by a dog that he once owned?'

I'm guessing it means a dog he had died, but could someone help me to understand it better? Cuz usually the ni in passive sentences is kind of translated to 'by' usually.
That's the other use of the passive form. Someone else can probably explain it better (if I wasn't so lazy I'd go look it up in my grammar dictionary and just tell you what it says), but I think what they (textbooks and such) usually say is it means something happens that "inconveniences" someone. に marks the person/thing doing the inconveniencing.

In my understanding, basically that sentence means his dog died and he didn't like it. It puts a little more emotion behind it compared to just 死にました, I think.
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#37
thanks, i love these forums so much. Everyone is a great help.
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#38
cloudstrife543 Wrote:ある友達は飼っていた犬に死なれました。

Does this sound like 'the friend i had was killed by a dog that he once owned?'

I'm guessing it means a dog he had died, but could someone help me to understand it better? Cuz usually the ni in passive sentences is kind of translated to 'by' usually.
Here's a forum where people talked about the same grammatical pattern (includes the exact dog sentence example)

http://thejapanesepage.com/forum/viewtop...f=8&t=8362

edit: I found it by searching for the sentence in google, which surprisingly helps a lot in situations such as these, just to let you know for future reference Smile I have no idea where I'd be without search engines when I'm confused about a sentence
Edited: 2009-06-17, 9:51 pm
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#39
Nuriko Wrote:
cloudstrife543 Wrote:ある友達は飼っていた犬に死なれました。

Does this sound like 'the friend i had was killed by a dog that he once owned?'

I'm guessing it means a dog he had died, but could someone help me to understand it better? Cuz usually the ni in passive sentences is kind of translated to 'by' usually.
Here's a forum where people talked about the same grammatical pattern (includes the exact dog sentence example)

http://thejapanesepage.com/forum/viewtop...f=8&t=8362

edit: I found it by searching for the sentence in google, which surprisingly helps a lot in situations such as these, just to let you know for future reference Smile I have no idea where I'd be without search engines when I'm confused about a sentence
There was a debate on that forum about how "natural" the sentence was, so I asked someone here and they said that it was a natural passive sentence, although typically 死なれた is reserved for family members-- people, though if the pet was well loved and/or the death was unexpected, the sentiment was perfectly natural.
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#40
死ぬ means die, not kill. So if you wanted to make a direct translation it would be "One of my friends was died by his dog."

死なれる != 殺される
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#41
cloudstrife543 Wrote:ある友達は飼っていた犬に死なれました。

I'm guessing it means a dog he had died, but could someone help me to understand it better? Cuz usually the ni in passive sentences is kind of translated to 'by' usually.
It's like "my dog died ON ME" instead of "my dog died". You loved them so much and it hurts that they are dead. That's why it's passive. "They" are inflicting their death on you.

Hope I'm making some sense Rolleyes
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#42
This reminded me of this example:

「妻に逃げられた」

I'm sure that's right (it seems to work for Google), meaning '[his/my] wife ran out [on him/me]" which seems to fit in with what masaman said above.
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#43
Aijin Wrote:...other than those four words I can't think of any other words that use the character...
...贅肉. Nothing personal.
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#44
magamo Wrote:
Aijin Wrote:...other than those four words I can't think of any other words that use the character...
...贅肉. Nothing personal.
Hey, I don't visit beaches often, so I have an excuse for forgetting that one Wink
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#45
飛行機への荷物の持ち込みには制限がある。通常1人5キロまでだ。


Can anyone kind of explain and describe the significance of への in this sentence and in sentences in general? I kind of get they mean when taking it onto the plane but I guess the の part is even more confusing. I have seen the への combo though before.

Thanks
Edited: 2009-06-30, 9:53 pm
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#46
cloudstrife543 Wrote:飛行機への荷物の持ち込みには制限がある。通常1人5キロまでだ。


Can anyone kind of explain and describe the significance of への in this sentence and in sentences in general? I kind of get they mean when taking it onto the plane but I guess the の part is even more confusing. I have seen the への combo though before.

Thanks
Think of ジョンからの手紙は・・・

(The) letter from John...

It's the same principle or grammar rule or whatever you want to call it.
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#47
cloudstrife543 Wrote:飛行機への荷物の持ち込みには制限がある。通常1人5キロまでだ。


Can anyone kind of explain and describe the significance of への in this sentence and in sentences in general? I kind of get they mean when taking it onto the plane but I guess the の part is even more confusing. I have seen the への combo though before.

Thanks
In a nutshell, you say

飛行機への持ち込み,
飛行機へ持ち込む, or
飛行機へと持ち込む.

The point is that 持ち込み is a noun while 持ち込む is a verb. Since 荷物 is a noun, you can say 飛行機への荷物には制限がある without changing the meaning.

The original sentence could be grammatically interpreted as (飛行機への荷物)の持ち込みには..., i.e., 飛行機への might be modifying 荷物, though the meaning is a little strange. In this case, it doesn't mean you can't bring heavy baggage into a plane. The speaker is saying you can't bring into a certain place heavy baggage that you're planning on taking onto a plane, e.g., your airline allows baggage heavier than 5kg, but the airport prohibits heavy bags in an elevator, that is, it means 飛行機への荷物の、このエレベーターへの持ち込みには制限がある。If you're talking right in front of the elevator, the speaker may drop このエレベーターへの because it's obvious.
Edited: 2009-07-01, 2:00 am
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#48
Anyone?
2月14日は日本では「女性が男性にチョコレートをプレゼントにする日」とされています。実はその起源は、メリーチョコレート社がこの日に東京の「伊勢丹」でチョコレートを販売したのがきっかけでした。

I can't seem to get the meaning for きっかけ in this sentence. I can guess it might mean 'started' or 'made it into a trend' something like that. But I'm not sure. Any help is appreciated!
Edited: 2009-07-01, 4:21 am
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#49
Musashi Wrote:Anyone?
2月14日は日本では「女性が男性にチョコレートをプレゼントにする日」とされています。実はその起源は、メリーチョコレート社がこの日に東京の「伊勢丹」でチョコレートを販売したのがきっかけでした。

I can't seem to get the meaning for きっかけ in this sentence. I can guess it might mean 'started' or 'made it into a trend' something like that. But I'm not sure. Any help is appreciated!
きっかけ is "cause," "trigger," "turning point," "chance," or "opportunity."

For example, ずっときっかけがなくて聞けなかったんだけど、means "I've been meaning to ask this, but..."
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#50
magamo Wrote:
Musashi Wrote:Anyone?
2月14日は日本では「女性が男性にチョコレートをプレゼントにする日」とされています。実はその起源は、メリーチョコレート社がこの日に東京の「伊勢丹」でチョコレートを販売したのがきっかけでした。

I can't seem to get the meaning for きっかけ in this sentence. I can guess it might mean 'started' or 'made it into a trend' something like that. But I'm not sure. Any help is appreciated!
きっかけ is "cause," "trigger," "turning point," "chance," or "opportunity."

For example, ずっときっかけがなくて聞けなかったんだけど、means "I've been meaning to ask this, but..."
Thanks, the sentence you provided is in a more obvious context yea. I love how you always give it such nice translations.
For me that sentence would be: I 一直(=ずっと, my mind switches to Chinese here) didn't have an opportunity and couldn't ask, 但(but)...
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