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RTK 2 methodologies

#51
I am currently working through RTK2, I'm around frame 1400, and having a lot of success, so I can just explain what I'm doing. I really don't think this is for everyone so this is just sharing in the spirit of giving information to people who are interested, not so much advocating that everyone else do the same...

First, I think that the reason RTK2 is working for me is that I'm not worrying about grammar or vocab at the same time either (my grammar is slightly below JLPT2), and my vocab is such that I knew pretty much all the compounds in the chapter called "Readings from Everyday Words." That might be a good test of whether RTK2 is a good idea for someone(?) So incidentally, the words presented in RTK2 are at about the right level for me to be learning anyway. Also I'm not doing kun-yomi at the same time either, my goal for right now is just to be able to exponentially increase reading ability and I know a lot of kunyomi.

I'm using Trinity, in the spirit of following Heisig's recommendation to just learn recognition for now, which is my goal as well. So in the vocab lists I've been adding a few groups every time I study. I enter the words given in Heisig, unless it's a word that I already know very well, in which case I use a dictionary to choose another compound using that kanji + reading, as an opportunity to add some new vocab, but only if the rest of that group is not taking too much brain power Wink

To associate the readings with the kanji, I am using a combination of mnemonics based on either the kanji itself or the compound meaning, depending on what is easier for a particular case. If I understand correctly, in some ways this is taking advantage of the same type of system as the movie method only less organized, and the order of kanji being learned is based on rtk2 instead of doing all of the groups of kanji with the same reading at once. So for example, lot's of the kanji with the pronunciation けん I associate with a story involving Ken from Barbie and Ken. Very silly, and if something better pops into my head, or I don't need that particular mnemonic, for example if the combination of the two kanji together lends itself to a better mnemonic associated with that compound meaning, then I use something different. I'm first and foremost trying to use whatever pops into my head first as the hook, just like with RTK1.

Regardless of whether or not this is a great system, it is working with a minimum amount of effort (not that I don't want to put in more effort, just time constraints). I spend about 20-30 minutes a day entering new RTK2 compounds, way less than that reviewing, and the rest of the time I have for Japanese I read online newspaper articles with the help of rikaichan to see if I am reading correctly and to re-enforce what I've learned, or currently I am reading a Haruki Murakami novel and understanding and being able to read the vast majority of it. The newspaper reading is especially rewarding if you just get onyomi down it seems. I have been using RTK2 for about 3 months, but have only entered vocab on about 45 different days (I make a new list each day I do it) and I can really say that now I can almost read the newspaper, whereas before I could not at all!!
Anyway, sorry it's long, that's what I'm doing, and like CaLeDee I would also like to hear other people's strategies.
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#52
I didn't even think of using Trinity and it was right there.. Damn I should of thought of that sooner. I'm not quite as high level as you so there's a lot of new vocab for me but with trinity it should be much easier to add new words as I get to them in the book. I'm not sure I understood but your using mnemonics for new vocabulary? I haven't tried that before.. Makes sense though, the more connections your brain makes to something, the easier it is to remember. Hope it doesn't lead to confusing things though. Thanks for describing your method.
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#53
CaLeDee Wrote:I'm not sure I understood but your using mnemonics for new vocabulary? I haven't tried that before.. Makes sense though, the more connections your brain makes to something, the easier it is to remember. Hope it doesn't lead to confusing things though. Thanks for describing your method.
Yeah one thing Heisig specifically mentions which I think it good to be careful with is not to not try to use homophonous Japanese words as part of your hook. So even though the meaning and pronunciation of 校 might be familiar to you in the word 学校、try not to make your mnemonic hook be about schools, because otherwise that will be confusing in the future for other kanji in which 交 appears at the signal primitive. So I use the English word "call" and picture a pronunciation of "kou" for that. So for example, when you get the compound 懸垂 けんすい、which means chinups, you see the two kanji, and from the RTK1 keywords you can get "suspend + droop." If you need to you can make a story from those to get you to "chinups." Then I have a story about "KEN suspending himself and then SWInging (sui) down." In reality, within a couple of reviews this is a much automatic process of recognition, and the silly stories disappear very quickly.
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#54
Uhm nice warning, I changed my keyword for 校 to "school exam". But I don't have studied many other words with use the same kanji. I'll check it now.
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#55
mentat_kgs Wrote:Uhm nice warning, I changed my keyword for 校 to "school exam". But I don't have studied many other words with use the same kanji. I'll check it now.
That shouldn't be a problem - it's if you start thinking of school every time you see the 交 in a kanji...that's the problem he's warning of, I believe.
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#56
Hi, I have just finished rtk1, now reviewing and wandering about the path I should take to rtk2. I was thinking that I should go through kana and give them all a primitive meaning, 48 kana + ten-ten, little circle, chisai tsu,ya,yu and yo = 56. Then use each kanji and the kana to create stories. Next step is to create compound primitives from readings that occur for more than 5 kanji, eg じゅう=し+”+ゅ+う, about 200 readings I'm guessing? So I'll go through rtk2, each time i find a new reading, check it's frequency in the index, and create a compound prim if necessary.
I read an article about kanjichain, it looks great, and took bits from that to try and clean the mess of the last chapters of rtk2, integrate the "random" readings as groups with the rest, ie sharing the compound kana primitives. It could simply be likened to redoing rtk1 only with furigana included as part of the kanji writing, and common furigana make new primitives.
I like this plan, it feels nice to me so I'm fairly sure I'll go with it. And this time I will not rush, I will do it alongside studying real japanese, can't neglect vocab any longer ne.
Comments? Suggestions?

btw I must make an apology, I haven't bought the book yet, just pdf sorry heisig! I'll buy it once I know my way ahead, since I don't like staring at a pc screen, or wasting money.
Edited: 2009-12-08, 8:22 am
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#57
I've read through the introduction of RTK2 for like three times now, to really grasp what are Heisig's "motives" with the book and what procedure one should follow to able to use it (and I know that Heisig mentions, that this is "just" a guide and not a complete course, but still...) and since the introduction was a bit vauge (for me) I peeked into the individual introductions of some of the chapters to try and "mine out" some information on how to make a course out of the guide.

By reading through the advices scattered throughout the book before actually start doing any reviewing and such I've laid out a "system" which I'll be using to do reviews (with a selfmade Anki deck) like this: from 'compound to reading-with-audio/meaning' and 'from reading-with-audio to meaning/compound' (e.g. meaning and writing). I think this is quite reasonable to start with.

The only thing that concerns me that Heisig doesn't give any clues (or one that I found useful... for now) to "learning the stuff contained by the frames of the book" (at least not on the chinese readings--in the 11th chapter he actually gives advice on "how to remember the japanese readings", but I'll get to this a paragraph later...). He gives an advice to review the "content" by looking on a compound and trying to remember the reading and meaning, but nothing on how to actually "learn it". By now I've read through the forum and I know that some of you (dear fellow users) are using KanjiTown, KanjiChain or such methods (which I were using during my "RTK1 days" without realizing it) , so I do know that I should learn it the way I want and in a way that is benefits me (I'm actually trying to find this way right now :).

So, take the first frame, which gives us the compound 二世. By looking at this one should be able to read this out loud with the proper reading にせい and associate with the meaning "second generation". But how one can learn this in the "Heisig way"? I mean, I could take the meanings from RTK1 "two" + "generation" and try to figure out the meaning of the compound which is working (at least for this particular compound), but I really don't know if should take this approach or not. Or should I make a new story out of those I already have? Or both? Is there a clear and obvious drawback approching the problem like this? What are your thoughts? (Yeah I know, lots o' stupidy questions which were probably asked and answere already, but I feel like writing ^^)

Heisig (at the Mnemonics at work subsection) in the 11th chapter lays out a method for the japanese readings which is seems cool, but should one take this method and apply to the chinese readings, or this is clearly stupid and I should just "get the hell out of here"? :D I can "feel" that is stupid, but with my limited knowledge of readings I could't know for sure...

So, that's all folks, please don't ingore me with a "TL;DR" :D
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#58
Sorry, I'm just popping into this thread and haven't read the entire discussion, but,

Psycho_Dad Wrote:...
So, take the first frame, which gives us the compound 二世. By looking at this one should be able to read this out loud with the proper reading にせい and associate with the meaning "second generation". But how one can learn this in the "Heisig way"? ...
You're WAAAAAAYYYYY over-thinking this. You learn 二世 by already knowing the vocabulary word nisei and applying the appropriate kanji to the appropriate parts of the word. Sometimes your key word will be new to you. In this case, you must learn the vocabulary word first, then apply the kanji. The opposite way, somehow fixing a particular reading into your mind along with a particular idea, is rote memorization and the opposite of the "Heisig way." Is there a way to associate the sound "ha" with the concept leaf? If so, you're in for some trouble when you realize that it also means tooth or blade, of course depending on context; and not to mention the numerous compounds that are formed with this sound as an ON reading.

Learning the readings of the kanji in the most intuitive way possible requires background knowledge in Japanese, is an organic rather than analytic process, and it is immensely aided by constant exposure (i.e. reading Japanese websites and publications, which incidentally demands a certain knowledge of the language to be able to make any sense of). No amount of systematization will get you from sound to shape. There are just too many kanji with the same reading and unrelated meaning to justify it as anything resembling efficiency. Incidentally, there is a way to get from shape to sound for a great number of kanji, at least for one of the readings. However, if you want mnemonics to work for you like they did in RTK1, you're barking up the wrong tree. The closest you could get is something like you'll see in Kanji Dicks, but even that has its limitations (for instance in all the stories for the sound blending together, not being precise, and no way to remember which word in the mnemonic is to be interpreted as the sound).
Edited: 2010-01-18, 3:57 am
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#59
jajaaan Wrote:You learn 二世 by already knowing the vocabulary word nisei and applying the appropriate kanji to the appropriate parts of the word. Sometimes your key word will be new to you. In this case, you must learn the vocabulary word first, then apply the kanji.
I think I get what you mean... it's just you hear this from the right and the total opposite from the left... So, thanks for your comment, really, I'm enlightened! I won't overthink anything anymore, because I'm getting tired of myself... I'm going to "go with the flow and get down to the gritty" and it's going to be a hit or miss! Thanks again and I'm out of here...
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#60
Psycho_Dad: Here's a TL;DR back to you. Smile

There's actually a bit of a system at the start of RTK2. Several chapters are based on phonetic components - the idea that one of the primitives indicates what the reading of the kanji will be. So doing the chapters on pure groups is worthwhile. (But remember that a few kanji appearing in those groups will appear in other chapters if they have multiple readings. In other words, "pure" means all kanji with that primitive have that reading, but some kanji might have other readings as well.)

Ignore the chapter on Japanese readings. It's ridiculous. The first chapter on history of kana isn't necessary.

As I recall, there are a couple other chapters that could be useful to look at: one lists the only kanji having a particular on-reading, and maybe one that lists kanji with kun-readings only? The chapter on common vocab can't do you any harm. Beyond that, it's a bit of a muddle and the benefits of the phonetic readings don't exist.

RTK2 will give you a vocab word for each kanji. I don't recall what kind of words he chose, but I'm not convinced that the order for learning is the best there is.

I'm a fan of learning readings for kanji vocabulary in an order based on usefulness and meaningful groupings (shared vocab, similar meaning, often confused, etc.). The book "Kanji in Context" is intended for intermediate learners, but the order could be used by self studiers. (See Katsuo's kanji spreadsheet in the General Language stickied topic: "Lists" or something like that).

One last point, wwwjdic has audio for words. That visual-sound-meaning connection is key. Short sentences help when memorizing new vocab, so check out the Core2000, 2001KO threads if you're ready for that. (You probably already know all this...)

You'll soon associate a kanji with its common reading and it won't feel so arbitrary. Smile Pure groups might speed up this process (b/c you'll be alert to other phonetic components). Good luck!

edit: I think you'll find that RTK meanings do help you remember word meaning and identify which kanji. It might not be etymologically accurate, but if often lets you make a temporary memory hook until the word sticks. Some people make fleeting mnemonics for some word pronunciations at the beginning. You'll figure out what works for you.
Edited: 2010-01-18, 7:36 am
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#61
I could not ignore the beautiful wall of text targeted at me, so I've read it ^^ And yes, I've checked out what's Kanji in Context and KO2001 about and pretty much every possible way that I could/should study--and it seems that everything has it's good and bad points, so I'll stick with RTK2 for now and see how it'll turn out after chapter 2 (the pure-group-thingy-stuff). I'll make some frickin' cards, feed 'em to Anki, start some studying and I'll come back to bitch about if it's working or not :D That's going to be the plan.
Edited: 2010-01-18, 8:22 am
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#62
I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question, but I thought it seemed better than starting a whole new thread.

I've just started RTK2 and I've decided to use the Kanjichain method as that seems to work for me and lots of other people on here.

The question is: how do you review?

Do you review Onyomi reading when looking at the kanji? Do you review with the compound vocabulary words (which seems a lot more troublesome to me just starting off, as I don't know the readings of the other kanji in the compound words and also my range of vocabulary is quite low) (but perhaps it's better as it will teach me more vocabulary, however then it will go down to rote memorisation of those vocabulary words which seems not to fit this system)? Did that last sentence even make sense?

Or are there other ways in which you review? I'd like some tips as I don't want to put in all the hard work and then have no way to actually end up memorising all of it, because I don't know how to review.

NB I do not have Anki (yet); I do my RTK1 reviews on this site only. I can of course get Anki if there are easy ways to review in there.

Thanks!
Edited: 2010-03-22, 7:59 am
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#63
Koos83 Wrote:The question is: how do you review?

Do you review Onyomi reading when looking at the kanji? Do you review with the compound vocabulary words (which seems a lot more troublesome to me just starting off, as I don't know the readings of the other kanji in the compound words and also my range of vocabulary is quite low) (but perhaps it's better as it will teach me more vocabulary, however then it will go down to rote memorisation of those vocabulary words which seems not to fit this system)? Did that last sentence even make sense?
I SRSed the compounds, the kana and meaning on the answer side. I studied the kanji readings ahead of time, though, but not with any special method.
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#64
I can`t imagine how you can combine RTK2 and KanjiChain Method. The approaches are different. KanjiChain isolate on-yomi. RTK2 focuses attention on compounds, and the task is to remember words, as you would do, when learning any other language. By this you create association between word and meaning, which makes remembering easier.
I review RTK2 compounds in Anki (question: compound; answer: kana, meaning and (from time to time) a few sentence examples or related compounds, which I copy-paste from epwing dictionary. Basically it is a rote memorization from the start, but SRS is so effective, you know. I don`t feel any particular difficulty with on-yomi (aside from making mental notes (images) of long or short vowels, adjusting my mnemonic stories, by making some objects or actions in it long or short).
Understanding the meaning(s) of a compound is trickier though, and I usually check kanji etymology to understand how a given compound acquired its meaning.
Edited: 2010-03-22, 9:14 am
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#65
LazyNomad Wrote:I can`t imagine how you can combine RTK2 and KanjiChain Method.
Perhaps I misunderstood the KanjiChain method and just came up with my own method that seems to work for now. :lol: But I make mnemonics using the meanings of the compound words as elements in my story (just like for RTK1 you use the primitives as elements in your story) as well as the RTK1 keyword of the signal primitive kanjis. That way I do learn the compound words and their meaning, I just need some advice on how to review the reading of those compounds.

Like I said: I've only just started; I have no idea what I'm doing or supposed to be doing, which is why I'm asking for advice here.

I think Anki using compound--->kana + meaning is a good way to review, since you both recommend it. I just think there should be an easier way to remember the words than merely rote memorisation, but I guess I've been spoiled by RTK1 in that way...

I'm just looking for as many tips as possible so I can take from there what works for me. Smile Thank you guys for these tips.
Edited: 2010-03-22, 12:21 pm
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#66
"I just think there should be an easier way to remember the words than merely rote memorisation, but I guess I've been spoiled by RTK1 in that way... "

@koOsHachiさん

There is an easier way! Then rote becomes easy too.

This is how I did vocabulary when first learning the readings when I finished RTK1: (http://forum.koohii.com/showthread.php?p...3#pid41343 and follow-up http://forum.koohii.com/showthread.php?p...3#pid92963 - I found that was all I needed. Eventually I learned 1-2+ readings per RTK kanji this way via C2k/KO2001, building upon one another and getting exponentially easier, and now I seem to pick up words really easily by 'rote' as you say--I mentioned elsewhere I 'own this orthography' now, by which I mean it feels as comfortable/natural as English does to me--except less characters to remember the sequence of, w/ visual hooks to remember meanings.

Even picking up new kanji, I have so many skills from finishing previous methods that coming up with stories (most of which I don't bother saving on this site unless I'm feeling like sharing for nostalgic fun/others' benefit [I don't actually go back to study them]) and becoming familiar w/ these arrangements of primitives is very easy.

Now I do the whole general/reference corpus + specialised/monitor corpus stuff, as I described twice in the Goodbye Sentences thread.
Edited: 2010-03-22, 1:51 pm
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#67
Thanks nest0r! Smile That looks pretty good actually; coming up with sort of a mnemonics with the images you already know from the singular kanji for compounds as well. I had already started doing that a bit, but I didn't know if it was a good way to go about. But I think it will work as I am still very much into the RTK1 method. Some people in that second link you posted didn't seem too eager about it, though. But I'll give it a go. And like you said; it gets easier the more words and sentences you know.
Edited: 2010-03-22, 3:34 pm
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#68
Koos83 Wrote:Thanks nest0r! Smile That looks pretty good actually; coming up with sort of a mnemonics with the images you already know from the singular kanji for compounds as well. I had already started doing that a bit, but I didn't know if it was a good way to go about. But I think it will work as I am still very much into the RTK1 method. Some people in that second link you posted didn't seem too eager about it, though. But I'll give it a go. And like you said; it gets easier the more words and sentences you know.
Here's more on the idea or similar ones--user Shakkun had success with it: http://forum.koohii.com/showthread.php?p...7#pid38047
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#69
Koos83 Wrote:
LazyNomad Wrote:I can`t imagine how you can combine RTK2 and KanjiChain Method.
...But I make mnemonics using the meanings of the compound words as elements in my story (just like for RTK1 you use the primitives as elements in your story) as well as the RTK1 keyword of the signal primitive kanjis.
I will try to explain why I don`t think its helpful to create mnemonics for compounds in RTK2, soon after you finished RTK1.
First of all, though the keywords in RTK1 were "selected on the basis of how a given kanji is used in compounds", they wouldn`t do much sense in RTK2, where compounds were for most of the time specifically selected as to show you that a given kanji also has another meaning (not related to what you have learned in RTK1).
Second, as your understanding of kanji gets better, your mnemonic story will change a lot - it will become a kind of vague mental association, in which concrete words are not neccessary. Also, as Heisig said in RTK1, you will eventually discover many cases where primitive elements are suggested according to their shape without any association to meaning. So, I guess it`s counterproductive to cement a particular mnemonic story in your mind, when you can develop your understanding to the next stage. As for me, I found that on-yomi itself is an effective keyword which helps me to remember the shape of a kanji and not to mix it with another kanji of a similar meaning (kun-yomi).
Third, though theoretically any kanji can be combined with another kanji, there are still few rules of how a compound is formed and how it produces its meaning. If you know etymology and history of the kanji, its easier to see how it acquired its meaning.
For exampe, a compound number 485 from RTK2: 多寡 - たか - amount; quantity. After finishing RTK1, you would naturally want to create some mnemonic involving "many widows" and connect it to "amount" and "quantity", right? Even, if you do succeed with it, you`ll miss the chance to understand that kanji for "widow" also means "minimum", "minority", "few". If you check its etymology, you`ll see that though this kanji means "widow", it also convey an idea of "minimum" since one person is a minimal "family" and "few" is an associated meaning. So, you have another perspective of this compound, namely "many"-"few". This two opposite meanings together refer to "amount" and "quantity". In the process you also learn that compounds can be created in such a way, where 2 opposite meanings together gives another meaning.
Or another example, compound number 1707 from RTK2: 天井 - てんじょう - ceiling. In this case, again probably the mnemonic would be something like "Heavens well on the ceiling", which really makes no sense. Instead, if you think about it, you can see that "heavens" here is a reference to something above the head (which could be sky or ceiling and kanji indeed shows us a "big man" with horizontal stroke above his head). Then comes kanji 井 which doesn`t mean "well" in this case, but simply is a shape indicator showing some kind of framing. Together these 2 kanji produce the meaning "ceiling", while apart none of the kanji has anything to do with ceiling.

So, this is a thrill and difficulty of RTK2, as you are forced to unlock the "secret" meanings of many kanji to get to the new level in your kanji quest. On-yomis are turned to your little helpers, rather than obstacles, really.

p.s. Having said that, I believe that many Japanese themselves can`t feel any meaning in kanji and remember them, as well as compounds, simply by rote memorization of shape.
Edited: 2010-03-22, 11:12 pm
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#70
Thanks LazyNomad. I don't think, however, that I have the time or the energy to look for the etymology of every kanji/compound. I work fulltime, so... It seems like something for the future, or something that will come naturally as my vocabulary broadens.

As with RTK1; the mnemonics I use aren't meant to stick forever. After a while you can just write the kanji without having to come up with the whole story, and eventually also the primitives will stop coming to you and you can just go keyword-kanji. I'm assuming the same will happen to the compounds I learn this way and the more words I know, the more of a connection I can see between kanji that have different meanings and get a feel for that.

However, I would like to know what you meant by "I found that on-yomi itself is an effective keyword which helps me to remember the shape of a kanji". How do you link the on-yomi to the shape? I had a very good look at the kanji Heisig has put in the first chapter; the ones that are parent to kana-syllables, but this doesn't go for all kanji. Can you explain your idea further?


Also ruiner: Thanks for the link. I'll be sure to check it out when I get home from work tonight.
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#71
Koos83 Wrote:How do you link the on-yomi to the shape? I had a very good look at the kanji Heisig has put in the first chapter; the ones that are parent to kana-syllables, but this doesn't go for all kanji. Can you explain your idea further?
I mean that usually on-yomi hints you at what primitive is used in the kanji. It helps with reviewing your regular RTK1 deck, if you add on-yomi to the keywords (after learning signal primitives). Heisig showed the pattern by defining signal primitives for "pure, semi-pure and mixed groups" in RTK2, though I don`t really bother to remember which one is "pure", "semi-pure" or "mixed". Bearing in mind, that over 90% of kanji are phono-semantics one could state that in over 90% of kanji there is a phonetic element, which hints enough about the approximate pronunciation of a given character. Those kanji that fall outside of groups with signal primitives in RTK 2 usually still have its signal primitives, just not so obvious.
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#72
Ahh I see! Yeah, that definitely helps. Thanks!

I think it will also take some time to start 'seeing' those things, as I've only just started. I'm sure in a few years I'll be thinking the same as you. Smile

Thanks for all your advice!
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#73
Hey All,

I have been piddling around this thread for the past 45 minutes and it seems that many people are thinking of tackling the ON-KUN readings by RTK2, KanjiChain, or through the Vocab they already know. I myself have finished RTK1 a couple of weeks ago, and I am trying to figure out the best method for improving my skillz.

But, what I am really surprised to read from many of the posts here in this forum is the overall Japanese proficiency level of the people who are planning to tackle all the Kanji readings. It seems to me, that people who are at a JLPT N5,4,3 (and 2) level of Japanese proficiency, should not focusing on the thousands of ON/KUN readings, but rather more on vocabulary and grammar. It makes no sense to me why you would want to know the reading to for a Kanji compound if you don't even know what the particular word means, let alone how the language functions.

Why not learn the readings while you learn all aspects of the language?

I myself just got my N2 (just barely), and I am finding my recent RTK1 endeavors have really put my vocab, grammar, speaking, and even reading abilities on hold (as I was essentially studying Kanji in English). For that reason, I will be focusing now on improving these aspects of my Japanse proficiency, while letting the ON-KUN readings come naturally to me as I progress forward.

I personally plan on memorizing pre-made sentences in one of Anki's CORE 6000 decks. By doing so, I will be able to learn new vocab, kanji readings, and grammar all in context. From that, I should be able to increase my spoken ability (because of my memorized vocab/grammar), as well as my reading (because of my memorized vocab, ON/KUN readings, and grammar).

Make sense?
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#74
I like knowing the readings so that I can guess at the pronunciation of a compound and find it in the dictionary that way. Smile People have learned Japanese a number of ways, and I think most people here don't use RTK2.
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#75
Hi everyone,

Thank you to the community for your awesome stories! And to Fabrice for providing this site which has allowed me to come this far so quickly.

Having completed the learning of the RtK1 kanji's meanings a couple days ago, I have eagerly anticipated coming to this thread to learn the best ways to learn the readings of the characters. I started with RtK2 and found the beginning of the Pure Groups chapter helpful, and the signal privitives (a concept I was already aware of in passing through basic Japanese conversation ability) are such an obvious and novel idea that it's truly a wonder they aren't codified into the education system in Japan or for foreigners elsewhere.

It took me a while to track down exactly what Kanji-Town and The Movie Method were, but once I did I immediately started experimenting; I have successfully retained all of the カン onyomi (I used the plot of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan -- I'm happy to share it; there are some almost-scarily appropriate connexions to be made with "coffin," "bagpipes," and the coffin ending up under the "tree-trunks") plus a few other smaller onyomi groups as well.

So here is my plan right now, and I welcome your input. I intend to proceed at a casual pace through RtK2, adding the onyomi and compounds to each one of my Reviewing The Kanji cards on this site as I go; when I finish a pure group, I'll force all those cards into "Move card to restudy pile" to memorize the compounds. And then when they pop up again for regular review, if I don't remember the onyomi and the compounds, I'll say "No" I don't remember, and cause them to go into further review. But The Movie Method on the whole seems to be an amazingly quick way to pronunciation-literacy! and the obviousness of signal primitives stands out anyway. Now every time I see a カン onyomi character in my review or on the street in Tokyo (there are 47, so that's a 1/40 chance usually), I exclaim "KHAN!" and think of the delightful connexion I've made between that character's meaning and the scene I've related it to. Therefore I might spend more time and energy on TMT onyomi blocks, and then allow RtK2 to further systematize my understanding of the signal primitives (which I admit are inherently obvious for the most part) and add vocabulary through compounds.

I've seen that some have bypassed RtK1 and just used TMT, and that's great; it's very impressive too since it seems to difficult without the foundation of RtK1! For myself, having already learned the meanings, I usually don't need to break up a character's old story or reinforce it with the new TMT plot; they seem to exist quite independent of each other without interference.

I have a question. There are quite a number of onyomi groups in RtK2 Index III which just one kanji. How have TMT-advocates dealt with this? Just single TV episodes or even a whole movie anyway?

Also, where is Trinity? I tried to track down some evidence and it looks like it was discontinued, unfortunately. I just wanted to confirm I can't try to use the Alpha version anymore; it looked helpful.
Edited: 2013-05-04, 8:45 am
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