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Is my tattoo accurate. What exactly does it say.

#1
I've had this tattoo for years and back when I got it this was the best translation I was told by another forum for what I wanted. I wanted it to say never give up in Japanese kanji. I'm an athlete and I have it on my forearm as a constant reminder. One time some Japanese tourists we're at my work and asked to see it and they kindve giggled and asked what I meant it to say. I told them and they said yes but it says it in a cute way. What exactly did they mean. Idk how to attack a photo to the post so message me if you can help please I will send you a picture.
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#2
upload on imgurl.com and paste the link here
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#3
(2017-10-20, 7:19 pm)karageko Wrote: Obligatory link to this amazing blog: https://hanzismatter.blogspot.com .
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#4
Why people want to have something tattooed on themselves which they cannot read is beyond me.  I mean I get it to a certain point.  It's a 'code' that only you know the meaning of.  And it's a conversation starter so the ladies can ask "ooh what does your tattoo say, world traveller?" and you can say "strength and honesty" and she says "I think that's hot".

But then you remember that menu at the chinese restaurant was more or less grammatically correct, but sounded a little off, or the mostly unreadable user manual was surely translated by a foreigner looking up words in a bilingual dictionary.  And then you say, maybe that tattoo I was thinking of getting sounds just as ridiculous to people who are fluent in japanese, mandarin, hebrew, etc.  Or maybe that Japanese tattoo artist is getting just a little tired of cultural appropriation and writes some double entendre on you just to make sure people who can actually read your tattoo know how ridiculous you are.
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#5
(2018-02-09, 3:27 pm)yogert909 Wrote: Or maybe that Japanese tattoo artist is getting just a little tired of cultural appropriation and writes some double entendre on you just to make sure people who can actually read your tattoo know how ridiculous you are.

i.e. the best kind of tattoos Wink
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#6
(2018-02-09, 3:27 pm)yogert909 Wrote: Why people want to have something tattooed on themselves which they cannot read is beyond me.

Agree. They should start with something simple, in hiragana or katakana first. Maybe something like おでん or ジャガイモ.
I'm sure it could attract a lot of girls.

Do Japanese actually tattoo kanji on their body? or is it just a foreigner thing?
Edited: 2018-02-09, 4:15 pm
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#7
(2018-02-09, 4:15 pm)pied2porc Wrote: Maybe something like おでん or ジャガイモ.
I'm sure it could attract a lot of girls.

yes!  Because おでん(Courage) and ジャガイモ (Benevolence) are the dual pillars of the samurai spirit(or something).  And chics dig samurais Tongue

(2018-02-09, 4:15 pm)pied2porc Wrote: Do Japanese actually tattoo kanji on their body? or is it just a foreigner thing?
Yes. I've seen them.
Edited: 2018-02-09, 4:51 pm
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#8
As a general matter, outside a few "cliques" where tattoos are "encouraged", tattoos are not very popular in Japan.

"Kanji" tattoos are uncommon. 

Sources: Japanese friends and I went to Japanese bath-houses several times a week (most bath-houses prohibit tattoos but there were a few "near" my house that did permit tattoos).
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#9
(2018-02-09, 4:15 pm)pied2porc Wrote: Do Japanese actually tattoo kanji on their body?

Yes, next to the large depictions of 風神 and 雷神 on their backs, lol.

But for a serious comment, it seems that younger Japanese are becoming more open to tattooing (based on some street interviews on YouTube, so not exactly academic), but older people will still probably think it's weird or something that gangsters do.

Just make sure you can hide your tattoos if you plan on going to Japan in the foreseeable future.


yogert909 Wrote:Or maybe that Japanese tattoo artist is getting just a little tired of cultural appropriation and writes some double entendre on you just to make sure people who can actually read your tattoo know how ridiculous you are.
Yeah that would be pretty funny... wait a minute...
Quote:[...]cultural appropriation[...]
Hold it for a second, I'm trying to think of the word... Oh, right:
Quote:[...]ridiculous[...]

But yeah, between the lack of regulation for tattoo shops and the potential for an artist you don't know to be a complete dick (or just incompetent), I don't understand how people can just go and get tattoos from random shops...
Edited: 2018-02-09, 11:12 pm
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#10
Could you.. Copy paste the text from the other forum? Or use google translate to draw the characters and copy the text.. Why the need for secret image exchanges. Sounds like spam to me.
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#11
https://imgur.com/a/MkVgn
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#12
(2018-02-10, 12:15 am)Uchiha18 Wrote: https://imgur.com/a/MkVgn

Sorry to be a jerk but I'm actually dying right now LOL.
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#13
You got pulled a fast one.
It means 'I will most definitely give up'

Very ahead of its time with the 2meirl4meirl aesthetic.
Edited: 2018-02-10, 1:01 am
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#14
(2018-02-09, 3:27 pm)yogert909 Wrote: But then you remember that menu at the chinese restaurant was more or less grammatically correct, but sounded a little off, or the mostly unreadable user manual was surely translated by a foreigner looking up words in a bilingual dictionary.  And then you say, maybe that tattoo I was thinking of getting sounds just as ridiculous to people who are fluent in japanese, mandarin, hebrew, etc.  Or maybe that Japanese tattoo artist is getting just a little tired of cultural appropriation and writes some double entendre on you just to make sure people who can actually read your tattoo know how ridiculous you are.

Or maybe a fellow really really likes soup.
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#15
Uchiha, think of it like this: Now you'll have to prove your tattoo wrong for the rest of your life! What better pep is there? ;D
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#16
Actually it is kind of ambiguous. 決して normally means "not at all" and あきらめる means "give up" but it is supposed to be in the negative and it isn't. So it's - well not right. But it's not quite as bad as saying I will definitely give up. It's maybe kind of like starting to say you won't and then kind of saying you will.

I think your tattooist probably didn't know much Japanese and chose a word that means "definitely not" and then just used the word for "give up" the way you would in English. But in Japanese it needs to be in the negative.

I don't know if there is any way it can be changed. It should read

決してあきらめない

so if there was a way to change that last letter to be な and add an い it would say what you intended.
Edited: 2018-02-10, 2:19 am
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#17
Unfortunately I don't think it's ambiguous at all. The English dictionary entry for "never" is probably definition [1] below, but that is specifically when paired with a negative. Definition [2] seems to confirm it has an affirmative meaning as well.

https://kotobank.jp/word/%E6%B1%BA%E3%81...E.E6.B3.89

けっし‐て【決して】
[副]
1 (あとに打消し・禁止の語を伴って)どんなことがあっても。絶対に。断じて。けして。「御恩は決して忘れません」「そんなことはもう決してするな」「彼は決して大きいほうではない」
2 必ず。きっと。
「―聟(むこ)やむすめに追ひ廻されて口惜しい日を送るであらう」〈鳩翁道話・三〉

The good news is that it's a pretty easy fix. Add a な onto the end (決してあきらめる) to make it the imperative "don't give up" or do as Cure dolly suggested for the meaning "(I will) not give up".
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#18
Splattedさん is right, of course, and I was aware that 消して can have a positive meaning (that's why I said "normally") but I think it's fairly rare. So I think most people seeing it would be aware that you were trying to say the opposite. Usually when people start out saying 決して they are saying "definitely not".

Splattedさん's suggestion is a great one. That way you just have to add a letter. My suggestion is probably exactly what you wanted in the first place, but it might be easier just to add a な
Edited: 2018-02-10, 4:01 am
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#19
It means the opposite of what you wanted it to mean. It almost seems like a joke tattoo, because anyone reading this will be expecting it to end with な (na - which would make it mean what you wanted), then they see it ends with る and they are either confused or giggling. The plainness of the font(?) also makes it seem extra silly. The good news is you can easily fix it by adding a な to the end. 不撓不屈 would have been a more tasteful way of expressing the idea you wanted.

[Image: Nn4MgjR.png]
[Image: MsSOTkB.png]
Edited: 2018-02-10, 6:06 am
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#20
(2018-02-09, 3:27 pm)yogert909 Wrote: Or maybe that Japanese tattoo artist is getting just a little tired of cultural appropriation......

OK, so then next time he gets sick and needs medical treatment invented by another culture (most likely American) I assume he'll turn down the treatment since he wouldn't want to be guilty of "cultural appropriation" Smile.
Edited: 2018-02-10, 7:16 am
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#21
(2018-02-10, 7:15 am)phil321 Wrote:
(2018-02-09, 3:27 pm)yogert909 Wrote: Or maybe that Japanese tattoo artist is getting just a little tired of cultural appropriation......

OK, so then next time he gets sick and needs medical treatment invented by another culture (most likely American) I assume he'll turn down the treatment since he wouldn't want to be guilty of "cultural appropriation" Smile.

It's even more rich, given that Japanese artist would have to feel "culturally appropriated" by using Chinese characters.
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#22
Please, ladies and gentlemen, this is a guest (お客様) who has come to the forum for some genuine advice on a real problem. I think we should treat him with respect.

To summarize the advice and information given here:

決してあきらめる

(your current tattoo) literally means "(I) always give up" or "(I) will definitely give up" but it starts with word that is usually used in sentences that mean "never" or "not at all". So most people (who knew Japanese) would probably realize the mistake. It looks like a genuine mistake by someone whose Japanese was not very good rather than a deliberate prank to me.

決してあきらめるな

(Just adding な to your current tattoo) Is rather informal and is like an order. So imagine a coach yelling "don't ever give up!" Very easy fix.

決してあきらめない

Is probably what you asked for and what the artist should have done in the first place. It means "(I) will never give up" or "(I) definitely won't give up". It's something the hero might shout in an anime when he's on the ropes but isn't going to give up.

But a more difficult fix. Still only involves changing one character and adding one though, so maybe possible.

If you want to PM me for any clarification, please feel free.
Edited: 2018-02-10, 12:30 pm
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#23
Reminds me of this song:


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#24
(2018-02-09, 12:31 pm)Uchiha18 Wrote: I've had this tattoo for years and back when I got it this was the best translation I was told by another forum for what I wanted. I wanted it to say never give up in Japanese kanji. I'm an athlete and I have it on my forearm as a constant reminder. One time some Japanese tourists we're at my work and asked to see it and they kindve giggled and asked what I meant it to say. I told them and they said yes but it says it in a cute way. What exactly did they mean. Idk how to attack a photo to the post so message me if you can help please I will send you a picture.

Hi Uchiha18, I'm curious.  What is your sport?
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#25
(2018-02-10, 12:15 am)Uchiha18 Wrote: https://imgur.com/a/MkVgn

for me that font is at least as problematic as whatever is written. 
it's like reading 決してあきれめる from a Denny's menu above たまご and below トースト.

i get that in america, this font for hiragana probably seems as exotic as calligraphic kanji, but in japan that is literally helvetica.

moreover to write helvetica in 800pt font on your body is like ALL-CAPS plus bold plus underline for a 4-word phrase which itself (as mentioned) is too bland and cliché for a movie hero soliloquy... but i digress.


NEVER GIVE UP OP!


whatever, to err is human. it is through experiences like this that we learn not to do more stupid stuff in the future. each of us probably has some equivalent thing that we will forever regret as well.
Edited: 2018-02-11, 2:19 pm
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