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Problem with heisig method

#26
Message #23 should be in a FAQ somewhere. It's a really great explanation.
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#27
nice tuto, I like the seemingly scientific approach ^^
that chipmunk is now my new wallpaper
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#28
(2017-11-05, 2:59 pm)pm215 Wrote:
(2017-11-05, 12:47 pm)ファブリス Wrote: Can you see an orange or an apple in your mind's eye? Everyone can.
No, not everybody can. At the extreme end this is aphantasia, with no mental visualization ability at all. (This is a good bit by somebody who's like that.) But even if you don't have complete lack of visualization ability you may not be able to 'see' an apple in your mind -- I can't very well, and it disappears almost instantaneously, and it doesn't work for more than a single small object.

I went through Heisig treating it all as verbal stories or wordplay.
What did you do? And can this work with learning Japanese words too?
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JapanesePod101
#29
(2017-12-08, 11:35 am)Davidandreis Wrote:
(2017-11-05, 2:59 pm)pm215 Wrote:
(2017-11-05, 12:47 pm)ファブリス Wrote: Can you see an orange or an apple in your mind's eye? Everyone can.
No, not everybody can. At the extreme end this is aphantasia, with no mental visualization ability at all. (This is a good bit by somebody who's like that.) But even if you don't have complete lack of visualization ability you may not be able to 'see' an apple in your mind -- I can't very well, and it disappears almost instantaneously, and it doesn't work for more than a single small object.

I went through Heisig treating it all as verbal stories or wordplay.
What did you do? And can this work with learning Japanese words too?


Yes you can. I have very poor visualisation abilities. My mnemonics are all based on wordplay/concepts/verbal stories.

I definitely use this for words as I don't believe in learning kanji separately from words (in practice of course one does learn the kanji as an entity I just think it is better to learn them as living parts of the language rather than as abstractions - but that's really another matter).

The answer to your question is a definite yes. I've done it since forever. You will probably find that if your visualization abilities are poor, another area like wordplay or conceptualization is correspondingly stronger mnemonically. Play to your own strengths in making mnemonics.

As it happens I am going to have a kanji book published soon which is very mnemonic-heavy, doing the whole thing in the form of a story and using a lot of puns, wordplay, concept-play as well as narrative. Of course people able to visualize the characters and events are likely to do so, but I think it works just as well for people with little to no concrete visualization ability - being one myself.
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