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How do you remember primitive order?

#1
I have a trouble with remembering the exact position of each element when they groups into kanji. My stories usually doesn't indicate position relation to keep them short and easy to remember. How do you deal with it?
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#2
Well, I made my stories with keyword either at the beginning or the end of sentence. And I have primitives in correct order. 

And where I did not, it took longer for me to remember the kanji.

I even added my own primitives where I felt necessary (though now, I just add them as another kanji in my deck, because they actually are most of the time). 

Example of my story for marrow:

Quote:SKELETON 骨 (#1383) got crushed by closing TOLLGATE 迶. Bone marrow everywhere...

Primitive: Tollgate 迶 keeps outsiders from the ROAD 辶 in your POSSESSION 有 (#83).

Note: While 迶 is rare kanji, it will help you write the ROAD on correct place.


If you use what Heisig gives you to make a story, which is "Skeleton . . . possess . . . road.", you might have a hard time remembering that the road is not the outer primitive.

Most of the order problems I noticed are because of Heisig omitted kanji as a building block (either rare kanji or he tried to hit the 2200 mark, for some reason) and used multiple primitives instead.
Edited: 2017-09-12, 1:14 am
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#3
(2017-09-12, 12:56 am)APXEOLOG Wrote: I have a trouble with remembering the exact position of each element when they groups into kanji. My stories usually doesn't indicate position relation to keep them short and easy to remember. How do you deal with it?

For that sort of problems my solution was to include in the images some sort of an indicator as for where the corresponding  primitive is placed. I prefer those indicators to be an action (like come (the associated primitive is to the left) vs. leave (the corresponding primitive is to the right)), but I also included some that are as simple as west vs. east or left vs. right.

Some examples:
safeguard - 護
The president is giving a speech to the flower decorated ships that safeguard our sees.
(Note: You need to imagine the president standing to the left of the ship.)

practice - 練
Sleeping Beauty is going to the East to get some practice in spinning.

reformation - 改
The evil, after taking shape of a snake, has come to the taskmaster Luther and thus the reformation of the church started.
(Note: The key to remember that character is the movement has come, which indicates position of the snake at the left side.)

queen - 妃
Cleopatra, being both a woman and a queen, is throwing away the snake that bit her.
(Note: She is throwing the snake away, thus the snake is to the right.)

instruction - 訓
You yell at the guy, who is trying to swim away from you in a river, with instructions on how to swim.
(Similar to the last example - swim away, hence the guy in the river is to the right.)
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#4
These are good examples of creating stories that help guide the positioning of each element. If your story does not guide positioning:

1. You may need to adjust your story, however. . .

2. Some elements are reliable or obvious so you should not put so much effort on positioning. So don't kill yourself changing stories that work fine for you.
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#5
Some tricks:

- As it has already been mentioned, Heisig sometimes doesn't group all the components into a larger component. For safeguard  the components are actually say/word + RHS (which I myself have called water lily). By learning the RHS and giving it a name, you won't worry about putting turkey below crotch, or whether flowers also covers say/word or not.

- Do not underestimate muscle and visual memory. Write the kanji down in the possible ways that you doubt between. In most cases either when writing the kanji down or when seeing it written down, you will automatically "feel" that one kanji is right and the other is wrong. This is a trick that gets more important over time, as you review kanji more often and even learn new vocabulary.

- When everything else fails, try to introduce the order of the primitives in the story somehow. With me simply thinking about the primitives in an ordered sequence it already helps to determine left-right and top-bottom. I had trouble with the primitives placement in rainbow , but after reading Green_Airplane's amazing mnemonic, I never had trouble with it again. "I see rainbow" -> "I C R" -> "Insect Craft Rainbow".
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