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A solution for increasing the size of kanjis in web browsers

#1
Hi,

I am new here, so first of all, hello everyone. Thanks to the entire community for sharing stories, and to Fabrice for making it happen in the first place (I just became a Patreon to show some love).

Perusing through the forum, I have seen many people having size problems when reading Japanese websites, with kanjis too small to be readable by beginners. I found at least 4 threads here (in 2007, 2008, 2012, 2013), and a number of other threads in Q&A sites.

Solutions that I found are not satisfying:
- zooming on the webpage with ctrl+ --- it breaks the layout of some sites as it magnifies everything
- changing the default font size in browsers --- alphabet-based languages will look much too big
- installing the otherwise excellent Rikaichan extension as it shows kanjis slightly larger when hovering over them --- it is not that much larger and there is no control over the size increase

I thought I was out-of-luck, until I found a great userscript written by Reddit user IllDepence and available at: http://moc.sirtetris.com/enlargeJapanese.user.js. On firefox, you would need the Greasemonkey extension to enable the script, and on Chrome it should work with Tampermonkey. You can change the size of Japanese text by tweaking the first line:

var minFontSize = 16; // change to 20 or 26 and your eyes will thank you



That's how this forum looks like without the extension:

[Image: 1.png]

And this is how it looks like with the extension:

[Image: 2.png]
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#2
I don't rely on big fonts a lot, lately, but I remember it being a huge problem when I was starting with kanji.
When I really need to, zooming mostly works for me, but it's true a few sites don't go with it as well as they should.

(2017-09-10, 9:48 pm)jealie Wrote: - changing the default font size in browsers --- alphabet-based languages will look much too big

Yeah, you could change the default font size *only for Japanese* ¹, but it only works when the page is using a non-UTF8 encoding (like JIS or so), or alternatively if it's explicitly marked as Japanese content (in the HTML source). If you have mixed content, you'll end up in the exact situation you are describing ².

So, even if I won't use it myself, thanks for linking the script, I'm sure it'll be of some use to others ;-)


Notes and references:

¹ In Firefox you can do that in Preferences > Content > Fonts & Colors --> Advanced, and then, in the dialog that opens, choose "Japanese" in "Font type for language..." before changing anything
(https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/cha...bsites-use)

² https://superuser.com/questions/227046/p...ot-working
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#3
People still use Firefox?  (I ask because they have it at my public library and the last time I clicked on it I got messages suggesting it had been ages since Firefox was used, you need to install this or that).

Any suggestions for Internet Explorer users?

In general I find kanji in printed materials are WAY too small.  It's like Japanese book publishers all use the same tiny font.

Luckily most of the stuff I'm using to study with I have in pdf format so I just blow it up on my computer screen.
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#4
(2017-09-11, 5:09 am)phil321 Wrote: People still use Firefox?
(...)
Any suggestions for Internet Explorer users?

You made my day ;^D.

I mean, I understand the question perfectly. It's still my navigator of choice, but since the advent of Firefox 4 (and we are now *ahem* at version 5.55 with v6 coming soon *ahem*, sorry, at version 55.0.2), it's been less and less pleasant to use.
Until 3.6, it was exactly what it promised: a truly I-dont-want-to-be-the-Mozilla-Suit-bloatware, streamlined and well thought out browser, with a huge and ever-increasing number of extensions to convert it into what you needed exactly (a powerful browser, a sleek pentesting platform, a reference manager for online documentation for scientists and scholars, a Japanese learning platform, etc.) with none of the unrequested overweight.
Versions 4.0 and 5.0 had a lot of rough edges, but weren't too far away from the initial premise yet.
Then, the Mozilla Foundation switched gears to try to compete in the same market as Chrome, resulting in us being left with an inferior Chrome clone that I still prefer for very marginal reasons (well, and to get away from the Big Brother as much as possible, but that's an already lost fight).

So, as I was saying, your puzzlement is perfectly understandable... and then you talk about IE?? X-DDDD.
Jokes aside, I'd seriously recommend you to ditch it in favor of almost any other alternative that suits your tastes, or at least to use it in parallel with other options if for some reason you're still tied to it.
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#5
(2017-09-11, 3:00 pm)faneca Wrote:
(2017-09-11, 5:09 am)phil321 Wrote: People still use Firefox?
(...)
Any suggestions for Internet Explorer users?

You made my day ;^D.

I mean, I understand the question perfectly. It's still my navigator of choice, but since the advent of Firefox 4 (and we are now *ahem* at version 5.55 with v6 coming soon *ahem*, sorry, at version 55.0.2), it's been less and less pleasant to use.
Until 3.6, it was exactly what it promised: a truly I-dont-want-to-be-the-Mozilla-Suit-bloatware, streamlined and well thought out browser, with a huge and ever-increasing number of extensions to convert it into what you needed exactly (a powerful browser, a sleek pentesting platform, a reference manager for online documentation for scientists and scholars, a Japanese learning platform, etc.) with none of the unrequested overweight.
Versions 4.0 and 5.0 had a lot of rough edges, but weren't too far away from the initial premise yet.
Then, the Mozilla Foundation switched gears to try to compete in the same market as Chrome, resulting in us being left with an inferior Chrome clone that I still prefer for very marginal reasons (well, and to get away from the Big Brother as much as possible, but that's an already lost fight).

So, as I was saying, your puzzlement is perfectly understandable... and then you talk about IE?? X-DDDD.
Jokes aside, I'd seriously recommend you to ditch it in favor of almost any other alternative that suits your tastes, or at least to use it in parallel with other options if for some reason you're still tied to it.

I actually use Chrome at the public library (because they have it and I like it better than IE).  But I'm afraid to install Chrome at home for fear of Google spying on my internet browsing.
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#6
@phil321,

You might be interested in Chromium - a browser very similar to chrome (built on the same codebase) but which is entirely open-source. Having an open-source code provides some reassurance that chromium ships without spyware.

Chromium uses the same extension system than Chrome, so you could also benefit for the same extensions.

As an aside, I complain all the time about firefox being slow msyelf, but at the end of the day I am still using it because it is not that bad Smile
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