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Do you input notes from your hobby books into anki?

#1
Quote:Please note that, this post is neither about language study, nor about the professional study related to our job or degree subject. It is about the book reading (not novel) that we read as a hobby, like I am a programmer, but I like reading philosophy and psychology books in my spare time.

The advantage is obviously that we can remember much more contents and key points of these books we read.

The downside is that we need to extract the key points from the book, input it into anki, and create cloze deletions…the whole process takes lots of time, even enough to read another book.



And the subtle and fuzzy is,

  1. Even if without anki, we can still remember some key points of them, with the natural memory of our life. For example, I still remember the “Brain in a vat” mentioned in the book “the big question”, even though I've never opened this book for the second time since eight years ago. And for those materials that do not give us a strong impression, as long as we really understand it well, we maybe can remember it well, so although we can't actively RECALL them, however, once we encounter or discuss the relevant topics later, we can RECOGNIZE a large part of them, indicating that we still remember them in the unconscious. Is it enough to prove that anki is not so necessary for the material that we are interested in and often read about?
  2. There is a saying that, if a knowledge is useful, then it will be used many times in our life, and each time it is used is actually a natural review. If a knowledge cannot be used in our life for a very long time, which means cannot be reviewed in the use and must be reviewed by anki, it means that this knowledge is not THAT useful, so we don't have to remember it and don't need to use anki for it. Do you agree with it?

What do you think? Do you use anki to remember the main points of the hobby books you have read? Smile
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#2
Heck no. Anki is drudgery (though I only find kanji cards to be particularly tedious, the rest is just boring), so I only use it on parts of Japanese that I need to memorize.

Hobby books aren't necessary to memorize, so I don't. Like you said, the bits that stick out will be remembered and the rest will make some amount of impression on the subconscious.

I mean sure, if I was really into military history, I might bother to memorize when various weapons and armor were developed or in which battles particularly interesting or unorthodox tactics were deployed, but I just don't care enough (you won't see me at any battle reenactments anytime soon).
Edited: 2017-08-08, 3:11 pm
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#3
I have recently started adding things to anki not necessarily aiming to memorize them, but things that I would like to read again a few times. Things like resonant quotes, dates, and other facts. I can set facts to super long intervals where anki serves more of a reminder than to memorize them.

Like you say, important facts will get reinforced by repeated use, but what about those facts on the edge which I look up infrequently, but repeatedly over they years? Anki might help me expand the circle of things I know from natural exposure. And anyway I like being able to retain a little more of the information that I find interesting.

Incremental reading can help with this if you are reading an e-text in anki.
Edited: 2017-08-08, 4:34 pm
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#4
(2017-08-08, 4:27 pm)yogert909 Wrote: I have recently started adding things to anki not necessarily aiming to memorize them, but things that I would like to read again a few times.  Things like resonant quotes, dates, and other facts.  I can set facts to super long intervals where anki serves more of a reminder than to memorize them.

Like you say, important facts will get reinforced by repeated use, but what about those facts on the edge which I look up infrequently, but repeatedly over they years?  Anki might help me expand the circle of things I know from natural exposure.   And anyway I like being able to retain a little more of the information that I find interesting.

Incremental reading can help with this if you are reading an e-text in anki.

① Thank you, can you give an example? First, we look it up infrequently, but repeatedly over the years, second, the marginal benefit of spending dozens of review times/brainpower/energy on it, and finally remember it using our mind, is greater than query/refer to it when the day we use it finally arrives years later, third, it's irrelevant with language learning and our job or degree subject?

Don't misunderstand, I'm not a fan of debate, just want to know when this situation will happen, which I cannot imagine and maybe brings me some inspiration. Smile

② For incremental reading, I used it several years ago both in supermemo and anki with that addon, in fact its essence I think is to import the learning material into anki/supermemo, to make creating cloze deletion just quicker and easier. Nothing more. other feature like remember where we read is just non-core feature. But because my first language and the main reading material is CJK, in which OCR is not as convenient as English, and also some other reasons I'm too lazy to say (article organization, adding book comments), in a word, finally I abandoned it (not belittle it, maybe fit for others)...Thanks for you advise.
Edited: 2017-08-08, 6:02 pm
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#5
It's hard for me to think of an example because by definition these things are consistently on the verge of being forgotten. The only example I can think of is a coding snippet that I use maybe once every 2 years. That particular snippet would be worth the time to memorize because it wouldn't take many reps to memorize it and I wouldn't need to stop work for a minute or two to look it up again or risk the example goes missing from the web. Sorry, not the best example but all I have.

But the more interesting thing to me is the realization that I don't need to memorize some things. Periodic re-reading is sufficient and I can let anki handle the scheduling. Consider you read a book and take notes. 5 years later you've forgotten almost everything you've read. You could re-read the notes every few years if you remember to. Or you could add the salient points to anki with a very long interval so that you aren't exactly memorizing them verbatim, but you re-read them often enough that you have a more robust memory of what you read.
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