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Any suggestion about cloze deletion cards?

#1
so now after studying about 5400 e-j and j-j sentences cards I'm considering trying cloze deletion cards to use them alongside my sentences deck. mostly because I think they'll be more useful for mastering speaking and writing.
as I'm completely inexperienced with such cards I'm looking for suggestions about what should I aim for? how should my cloze deletion cards look like? and what are the most time-efficient ways for making them?
I'm hoping for complete j-j cards or at least using as little English as possible.
sorry for my poor English
thanks everyone
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#2
well you gotta experiment to see what works best for you.

I've done variations of clozing out a single syllable for long-ass words, putting definition and word/sentence on front and blanking out part of the definition or part of the word or part of the definition and part of the word. you could put a sentence or a paragrph on the front and blank stuff out. there is an anki plugin for cloze deletion but i don't use that anymore because I find it more efficient to mass import after formatting stuff with excel and notepad.
Edited: 2017-06-09, 8:42 pm
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#3
I find cloze deletion cards very effective but they are a little hard to make, because there could be many possible answers to a single cloze deletion card. The hard part is to make them unambiguous :/
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#4
I'm just kickstarting (again) my vocabulary, so clearly not at your level, but I've been using delvinlanguage.com for some time now and I'm really loving the way they do it, which is helping both my vocabulary and my listening: you watch (and, more importantly, listen to) a short video excerpt; then you are shown the transcript with one of the words clozed and asked to fill in pronunciation and meaning for it. I also add one more step: while pressing enter to input the answer, I close my eyes before it's shown and try to produce by heart the word in kanji form.

One of the strongest points of this format is being shown a different video (and, logically, a different clozed transcript) each time you're being tested for the word in question (well, to be honest, at present a non-negligible amount of words have just one video for them, and most of them have only three or so, but I never felt like I was remembering the word only because of the context).
Another good point is the lack of ambiguity because you've heard the exact word you need to produce.

I thought about what would be needed to do the same in anki and, while perfectly doable in theory (read here, for instance, how you could use javascript to randomize the video and sentence chosen for the front of any given card), both bootstrapping such a deck and specially creating its cards (I guess srs2anki-like software would be of some help) would be an incredibly huge PITA... not to mention the amount of storage needed because of the videos (which could be shared by several cards, but yet...)
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