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nest0r's darkjapanese/ja-dark blogs deleted? any info?

#26
I did archive about 16 of his Workpress articles as well as the first half of ja-minimum. The following includes the original formatting and all of his pictures. However, you have to use Safari web browser. Sorry about that, I have a Mac.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8cZC9J...sp=sharing

Also, can someone create a location that we can all save our stuff to so that it is all in one place and others can download it?  It would also be nice if OP can put that link at the top of this thread.

Also, I thought that his handle on this website was ja_min and not nest0r.
Edited: 2017-06-14, 2:39 am
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#27
One tip from him/her,
Feedback:
Recurring reconsolidation of cards results in stronger encode. Qualitative remarks during review strengthen review process and enhances schema, upon card's reappearance.
Edited: 2017-06-14, 5:12 pm
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#28
I liked his comprehensive output hypothesis and his idea on how to implement it inside Anki.
But beside that I didn't read much because I found the noise/signal ratio was too much and I got tired.
So what is his method in a few words and how does it translate in practice? Does it give better results compared to other methods? How does his researches help in learning the Japanese language?
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#29
(2017-06-13, 9:48 pm)Whiteskulleton Wrote: This has shattered my entire universe. I based my method I had been researching for years on this man's work and now POOF. He has some of the most comprehensive and well-documented research about the Japanese language that I have ever read and this is an absolute loss to the academic world in my view. I am very distraught about this.

Agree. It is disheartening. I loved his experimental approach and applied a lot of his thoughts/suggestions to my language learning and life.

(2017-06-14, 2:29 am)Whiteskulleton Wrote: I did archive about 16 of his Workpress articles as well as the first half of ja-minimum. The following includes the original formatting and all of his pictures. However, you have to use Safari web browser. Sorry about that, I have a Mac.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8cZC9J...sp=sharing

Also, can someone create a location that we can all save our stuff to so that it is all in one place and others can download it?  It would also be nice if OP can put that link at the top of this thread.

Also, I thought that his handle on this website was ja_min and not nest0r.

Thx for posting this =) Another piece of the puzzle. 

I will gather the material in a single place and post it here in the next few days. 

nest0r was definitely the author of darkjapanese/ja-min and other offshoots. ja_min seems to be an alt account.
Edited: 2017-06-15, 2:36 am
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#30
I found out this just now. I've noticed that I was not receiving notifs from his tumblr. I was surprised that posts about tools are shown when going to his account.

This is really sad, I was following his research, though not that fast as his research take some time for me to grasp. Hope everything's okay.
Edited: 2017-06-15, 4:48 pm
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#31
This just killed me.....
P.S.
Does anyone have an archive from this link:
https://darkjapanese.wordpress.com/tools/ ?
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#32
Damn, I liked his ideas. I didn't get to implement them all, and I didn't agree with everything (like some of his output-based training that seemed really tedious) but the stuff about altering the Anki intervals literally changed the game for me. Glad I was lucky enough to read a lot of his theory.

Maybe Khatz killed him.
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#33
what does he say about anki intervals?
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#34
I forget his reasoning but he advocated a longer initial learning phase, I believe to fully flesh out the first few encodes while avoiding over-learning.

The times were around 4-10 120-180 540-1080, the easy button is for skipping the learning phase.
Extending the reviews creates less stress with reviews and the transition to "spaced repetition" is smoother.
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#35
(2017-06-18, 11:17 am)Aspiring Wrote: I forget his reasoning but he advocated a longer initial learning phase, I believe to fully flesh out the first few encodes while avoiding over-learning.

The times were around 4-10 120-180 540-1080, the easy button is for skipping the learning phase.
Extending the reviews creates less stress with reviews and the transition to "spaced repetition" is smoother.

So it was all about the learning phase? Did he say something about the review intervals? (starting ease, interval modifier)
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#36
That's really bad news. I also liked his ideas and just started to use some of them on my study method.
I hope we can regather all of his work. It's really inspiring.
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#37
(2017-06-18, 11:56 am)cophnia61 Wrote:
(2017-06-18, 11:17 am)Aspiring Wrote: I forget his reasoning but he advocated a longer initial learning phase, I believe to fully flesh out the first few encodes while avoiding over-learning.

The times were around 4-10 120-180 540-1080, the easy button is for skipping the learning phase.
Extending the reviews creates less stress with reviews and the transition to "spaced repetition" is smoother.

So it was all about the learning phase? Did he say something about the review intervals? (starting ease, interval modifier)

I believe 300% was his preferred setting. In a different post he wrote about not really needing complex intervals for spaced repetition and not to worry about interval modifiers ie. you're either right or wrong, so he designed a 'low-stakes review' addon which prevents ease alteration from pressing hard/easy which made anki a no frills system. To be barely correct is impossible, so to speak. He also mentioned more research is necessary to prove convoluted interval settings are worthwhile.
Edited: 2017-06-18, 12:53 pm
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#38
There's three pages archived here: http://archive.is/darkjapanese.wordpress.com.
Another couple of them: https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/s...clnk&gl=br

I've gathered about 40 posts from the site darkjapanese.wordpress.com on the MAFF format (to open it you need the Firefox Plugin Mozilla Archive Format installed) from Google Cache. You can download it here (it includes Whiteskulleton files too, thanks):
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0...sp=sharing

I don't know the full list of posts of the site, but I know from the Recent Posts section that some of them I couldn't find through Google Cache. For example:
Limitless III-IV-V: Nutrition and Health
CriteriEN: No Card Left Behind
Voidness Way

If someone could help me find those posts it would be great. If you download the folder, there's an index.xlsx file with the post date, title and link to .maff file.
Edited: 2017-06-18, 3:32 pm
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#39
(2017-06-18, 12:57 pm)tomas_xc Wrote: There's three pages archived here: http://archive.is/darkjapanese.wordpress.com.
Another couple of them: https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/s...clnk&gl=br

I've gathered about 40 posts from the site darkjapanese.wordpress.com on the MAFF format (to open it you need the Firefox Plugin Mozilla Archive Format installed) from Google Cache. You can download it here (it includes Whiteskulleton files too, thanks):
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0...sp=sharing

I don't know the full list of posts of the site, but I know from the Recent Posts section that some of them I couldn't find through Google Cache. For example:
Limitless III-IV-V: Nutrition and Health
CriteriEN: No Card Left Behind
Voidness Way

If someone could help me find those posts it would be great. If you download the folder, there's an index.xlsx file with the post date, title and link to .maff file.
Yandex has a bunch in their cache =>

Voidness Way
CriteriEN
Limitless III-IV-V

Also, Digg Reader has the content of ja-dark on their RSS database going back to 2014. But I have no idea how to archive it. 

Also, anyone who has an offline RSS reader may have all the content saved on their PC.
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#40
(2017-06-18, 12:01 pm)tomas_xc Wrote: That's really bad news. I also liked his ideas and just started to use some of them on my study method.
I hope we can regather all of his work. It's really inspiring.

Agree tomas. Even if you didn't agree with his methods, you have to admire his curiosity and willingness to explore and incorporate new ideas from a wide variety of sources.
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#41
Thanks, brithomer. I included those missing ones on my gdrive folder.
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#42
(2017-06-21, 4:36 am)tomas_xc Wrote: Thanks, brithomer. I included those missing ones on my gdrive folder.

https://www.yandex.com/search/?text=dark...dpress.com

Here is the list of the rest of archived pages on Yandex. Mostly overlap with what you have already archived. I will have to go thru and compare.
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#43
(2017-06-18, 11:17 am)Aspiring Wrote: I forget his reasoning but he advocated a longer initial learning phase, I believe to fully flesh out the first few encodes while avoiding over-learning.

The times were around 4-10 120-180 540-1080, the easy button is for skipping the learning phase.
Extending the reviews creates less stress with reviews and the transition to "spaced repetition" is smoother.

He later scrapped this in favor of 10 minutes -> 2 days because it was convoluted.
I've been using 400% intervals (2d 8d 32d etc.) and it works great, once you know the kanji. (and probably knowing a lot of words helps, as well as adding multiple words that share kanji readings)
Edited: 2017-06-22, 12:03 am
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#44
Here is the tools page from my Zotero.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B__sJcG...sp=sharing
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#45
Tools


Dark Japanese on Pinterest
See also: http://ja-dark.tumblr.com/tagged/language-learning-software
Tools created by Christopher Brochtrup aka cb4960
See readme.txt files for instructions. I am not cb4960.
  • JGlossator Link – Used to perform a gloss on Japanese text complete with de-inflected expressions, readings, audio pronunciation, example sentences, pitch accent and kanji information. Now includes dependency parsing and jCorrect.
  • Kanji Word Association Tool + KWAT Dictionary Generator – This tool was created for students who want to learn kanji and words at the same time in the most optimal fashion possible. Based on a user-provided list of kanji, this tool will generate a list of words that are associated with each kanji and ensure that each word consists only of kanji that you have already studied up to that point.
  • Epwing2Anki  – Link – May be used to automatically or semi-automatically create Japanese Anki vocabulary cards based on a provided list of words and one or more of your favorite EPWING dictionaries and/or the included EDICT J-E dictionary and Tatoeba example sentence corpus.
  • Audio Lesson Studio – “Allows you to create simple, user-defined, .mp3 audio lessons that may be used as an aid for learning languages or just about anything else – use your imagination! Audio can be based on existing media or automatically generated using Text-To-Speech.”
  • Capture2Text – Japanese/English (and more) OCR Utility – “A utility that allows you to quickly capture a small portion of the screen, OCR it and (by default) save the result to the clipboard.”
  • Japanese Text Analysis Tool – Used to analyze Japanese texts and generate 3 kinds of reports: Word Frequency Report, Kanji Frequency Report, and Readability Report.
  • Japanese Text Analysis Tool reports for a large number of innocent novels – Includes word frequency report, kanji frequency report, and readability report.
  • cbJisho – E-J Dictionary Based on Word Frequency – “An English-to-Japanese dictionary that sorts results based on relative frequencies in blogs, newspapers and novels.” Usage
  • JNovel Formatter – “A utility that will convert a Japanese novel (in text form) to one or more specially formatted HTML files.” HTML Ruby Add-On (Firefox)
  • Rikaisama – A modification of Rikaichan to include 1) JDIC vocabulary audio support, 2) EPWING Mode, 3) J-J sanseido dictionary lookups, 4) Advanced save options. 5) Ability to save directly to an Anki deck. 6) Super Sticky Mode. 7) Startup tab in options dialog. 8) Kanji link to the study page. Usage – Like Lingoes, allows for within-definition lookups as well.
  • subs2srs – “A utility that allows you to create SRS (for example Anki) import files based on your favorite foreign language movies and TV shows to aid in the language learning process.” Usage – Now with Subs Re-Timer (Usage)
  • Aozora Gaiji Replacer – “A utility that will look at a Japanese novel and replace aozora gaiji constructs with UTF-8 equivalents.”
  • Aozora Remover – “A utility that will remove the Aozora constructs and HTML tags from a file or a directory of files.”
  • vobsub2text – “A utility that uses OCR technology to automatically convert VOBSUB subtitles (.idx/.sub) to subrip (.srt) subtitles.” (Currently in the experimental stage).
  • Word List Duplicate Remover Link – Finds both unique and duplicate words based on a list of words that you want to learn and the words already in your Anki deck.
  • cb’s Frequency List Sorter Link – Sorts a list of Japanese words based on their frequency.
offline Popup dictionaries
  • Lingoes – Allows for within-definition look-ups, allowing the user to cycle through definitions based on other definitions.
  • StarDict – There are many more Japanese dictionaries for Stardict than Lingoes, such as found here.
Text Analysis Tools
  • AntConc – Freeware, features concordancing and text mining functions.
  • KH Coder – “KH Coder is a free software for Quantitative Content Analysis or Text Mining of Japanese language data.”
  • Language Grid Playground – Various language services, including semantic dictionaries, translators, morphological analysis, and dependency parsing.
  • Transcriber – “A tool for segmenting, labeling and transcribing speech.” Superseded by TranscriberAG.
  • Translation Aggregator – Suite that compiles web tools for translating, morphological parsing and annotating. * Even better than this is jGlossator.
  • jGloss – Offline glosser/parser with various display and export options; uses edict files and optionally, Chasen.
Other Tools
  • AntConc – Text concordance freeware.
  • Kage Shibari – Tool for controlled shadowing, interactive audiobooks which includes using .trs files. To be explained further in a separate post.
  • Word Search Creator – Desktop freeware to make your own Japanese word search puzzles.
  • Wordsearch, Crossword – Make your own word search and crossword puzzles from Japanese words.
  • Anki – SRS (Spaced Retrieval System); highly customizable digital flashcards with schedule based on algorithm and self-graded user feedback.
  • AnkiMobile – iOS version of the above. Quite sleek and robust.
  • TxtMiru 2.0 – Reader that supports vertical, selectable text. Note: Selectable text now requires right-clicking and toggling 選択モード.
  • Aozora to Kindle – Online tool that converts Aozora-formatted books to Kindle-friendly .pdf files, with ruby and vertical, selectable text.
  • 青P – Offline tool for converting to vertical text .pdf, with Aozora formatting support.
  • Dinglabs Desktop Player – Offline player for reading and listening to audiobooks with interactive transcripts.
  • ePubunco – Aozora to ePub bookmarklet.
  • ePubpack – Create ePub3 files (which support Japanese formatting). Usage
  • espur – Japanese ePub3 reader (supports vertical text, ruby, etc.). Alternative DL links as their own is very slow: Mirror 1 (Minus), Mirror 2
  • AIR草紙 – Reader that supports ePub and .pdf; requires Adobe AIR 2.6+, doesn’t seem to work for ePub preformatted for Japanese (see espur for samples).
  • Gensen: Terminology Extraction System – “You can extract valued domain specific terms from Web pages or text you input. The extracted terms are sorted and displayed in descending order of their importance.”
  • Japanese Proofreader 日木語文章校正ツ‐ル – Uses Yahoo! Japan proofreading API. Beta phase.
  • Monjo Hakase – Web implementation of jcorrect/CaboCha.
  • jcorrect – Another web implementation, that doesn’t seem to work. Linking anyway.
  • Adobe Digital Editions – Supports Japanese ePub3 – Recommended.
  • AozoraEpub3 – Create Japanese epub3/mobi with vertical text and rubi, etc. See here.
  • Chakoshi (茶漉) – Searches collocations based on Aozora Bunko and Nagoya conversational corpus.
  • Natsume – Writing Support System – Corpus-based collocation lookups, with various filters, including sorting by frequency and emphasis on genre (academic papers, blogs, books, etc.) and which particles to use.
  • あすなろ – Japanese Reading System for Multilingual Environments – Features morphological analysis, sentence diagramming (dependency is okay alternative to KNP/Langrid as mentioned here), compound phrases, idiomatic and “intentional” meanings, example sentences, et cetera.
  • NLB (NINJAL-LagoWordProfiler for the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese) – NLB, jointly developed by NINJAL and Lago Institute for Language, uses the technique of lexical profiling and allows the user to profile, without much knowledge of computers, the collocational and grammatical behavior of the Japanese nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs included in NINJAL’s Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ).
  • Chantokun – “Chantokun can revise Japanese sentences statistically with large scale corpora. A whole new experience for Japanese learners.” I hesitated to recommend this due to its reliance on Lang-8’s corrections as its corpus.
  • Nutmeg – This partially relies on a learner corpus, so I’ve been hesitant to recommend this also.
  • The Reading Tutor Web Dictionary – Another online glossing tool.
iOS apps Android
  • Mojitomo – Words with Friends for Japanese. Seems to use hiragana only.
  • Seppukuman – Hangman w/ kana, using seppuku instead of hanging.
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#46
I can't believe everything is deleted. There was so much good stuff, and so many good links to good stuff. I'm glad I downloaded all the textfile books he linked at least while I had the chance.
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#47
I saved some of his links a few months a ago and now they're all gone.
Can't believe he left us all without a trace or reason.
Really a big loss for Japanese learners or learners in general...
I hope he's well.
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#48
I found the google cache of his Encrit (for info on Anki intervals) post and his archive overview with many of his posts and output them to large, tabloid pdf files. I have also included the addons I use to implement encrit.
Here is a link if anyone would like them.

For a more down-to-earth tutorial on encrit, a very nice human named Vlad has written up a nice guide here.


** edit: fixed link. Thanks @hnous927
Edited: 2017-06-26, 10:36 pm
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#49
Papa bless to everyone who managed to archive anything. I shouldn't have waited, it would have been an easy thing to clip them into my Evernote at least. Goes to show, never take the permanency of the internet for granted if there's only one source.
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#50
(2017-06-26, 2:12 pm)llamainpajamas Wrote: I found the google cache of his Encrit (for info on Anki intervals) post and his archive overview with many of his posts and output them to large, tabloid pdf files. I have also included the addons I use to implement encrit.
Here is a link if anyone would like them.

For a more down-to-earth tutorial on encrit, a very nice human named Vlad has written up a nice guide here.

Your link doesn't work and I'm guess you're referring to this page?
https://vladsperspective.wordpress.com/2...uge-gains/
As someone posted above, is it
https://hghltd.yandex.net/yandbtm?fmode=...71&keyno=0
the same as
https://darkjapanese.wordpress.com/2016/...crit-v3-0/

Thank you!


(2017-06-26, 5:53 pm)NinKenDo Wrote: Papa bless to everyone who managed to archive anything. I shouldn't have waited, it would have been an easy thing to clip them into my Evernote at least. Goes to show, never take the permanency of the internet for granted if there's only one source.

Yes... Instead of bookmarking I should change it to saving the pages
Edited: 2017-06-26, 8:07 pm
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