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Japanese - what the texbooks don't tell you - the movie!

(2017-11-22, 10:37 pm)CureDolly Wrote: Of course not everyone is going to like my work or who I am. That's just life. There's no need to be so hostile. Though if being hostile is what floats your boat I guess that's ok too.

"Floats your boat"? That sounds like something a 58 year old man in a bar would say.
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Heehee. I'm afraid I'm not that au fait with slang.

I probably shouldn't try to use it.

It does come off some of the time doesn't it? Or do I always sound weird when I don't talk formally? Not denying that I probably also sound weird when I do talk formally of course.
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(2017-11-24, 12:40 am)CureDolly Wrote: I probably shouldn't try to use it.

"Floats your boat" is hardly a phrase restricted to middle aged men; you shouldn't have any reservations about using it.
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See this thread for Holiday Countdown Deals (until Dec 15th)
JapanesePod101
Oh thank you. That's relieving.

I'm not sure I've ever used it before, but it's nice to know it can stay on my list of possibles.

After all, a floating boat can be just the thing you need in certain emergenciesʕ•ᴥ•ʔ
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Quote:Jesus christ
sorry, but who's that guy again?
I mean really, can you explain me who he is? what he does in life?

Anyway that's an aweful way to express your opinion, no matter how you disagree with someone.


Quote:That sounds like something a 58 year old man in a bar would say.
maybe because YOU interpreted it like a 58yo man in a bar...Wink
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The "suffering passive" is one of the weirder concepts thrown up by western textbook version of "Japanese grammar".

I suppose everyone must ask herself "why do the Japanese lapse into the passive voice in order to complain about something? What sense does that make?"

The answer is that it makes no sense - but then it doesn't actually happen. It is an example of how tangled things get once one makes certain initial wrong assumptions - such as the assumption that the Japanese receptive form is passive in the same sense that the English passive voice is passive.

What really happens in the "nuisance receptive" (迷惑受け身) as the Japanese more accurately call it, is in fact pretty simple and closely equivalent to  something that goes on in English all the time.

I hope I've managed to explain it in this short video.

https://youtu.be/gKNGbZvxgzM
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CureDolly,

 If you're so good at telling us "what the textbooks don't tell us" about Japanese, maybe you could tell us what the textbooks don't tell us about how to pass the 聴解 part of the JLPT!  That would be much appreciated.
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Eheheh, well I try only to pipe up when I think I have something really useful and new (or at least too-little-known) to contribute. I don't think I have much here, I'm afraid.

A friend of mine who took the test in Chicago a few days ago tells me she was greatly helped by a program of watching three half-hour anime or dorama every day for some weeks in advance without J-subs (obviously without E-subs either), one of which had to be new - in addition to doing the boring ol' Kanzen Master exercises.

Another thing I always recommend (regardless of any exams) is having Japanese talk on your iPod (or whatever) as much as possible - fairy tales, anime soundtracks, anything you can mostly understand (with as much or as little advance preparation as you need) and have it on in the background when you are doing things that don't require "verbal attention". It's a good idea to use material you like because you'll find your attention being drawn by it. If it's boring you'll just shut it out.

In summary, if at all possible (and if you want to), make Japanese spoken language a part of your life, and try to get the sound and rhythm of the language into your blood.


Nothing new or revolutionary here, I'm afraid, but it's all I've got.
Edited: 2017-12-05, 8:34 pm
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(2017-12-05, 8:33 pm)CureDolly Wrote: Eheheh, well I try only to pipe up when I think I have something really useful and new (or at least too-little-known) to contribute. I don't think I have much here, I'm afraid.

A friend of mine who took the test in Chicago a few days ago tells me she was greatly helped by a program of watching three half-hour anime or dorama every day for some weeks in advance without J-subs (obviously without E-subs either), one of which had to be new - in addition to doing the boring ol' Kanzen Master exercises.

Another thing I always recommend (regardless of any exams) is having Japanese talk on your iPod (or whatever) as much as possible - fairy tales, anime soundtracks, anything you can mostly understand (with as much or as little advance preparation as you need) and have it on in the background when you are doing things that don't require "verbal attention". It's a good idea to use material you like because you'll find your attention being drawn by it. If it's boring you'll just shut it out.

In summary, if at all possible (and if you want to), make Japanese spoken language a part of your life, and try to get the sound and rhythm of the language into your blood.


Nothing new or revolutionary here, I'm afraid, but it's all I've got.

Thanks, this is helpful.

As I thought, it's not enough to just do JLPT listening practice exercises.
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This week I am dealing with i and na adjectives.

https://youtu.be/yJ2EhSPLQsk

I called it "Adjectives: what I wish I'd been taught" because that is what it really is. In fact the original article this is based on came very near the beginning of my investigations into the whole area of the inadequacies of standard textbook teaching and how it could be remedied. In a way, it may even have been the start of it.

I remember how astonished I was in the early days that most texts on Japanese grammar just don't tell you things like what the "na" in a "na-adjective" actually is or how i-adjectives really function.

This isn't "secret information" (like, say the fact that "koohii ga suki desu" just doesn't grammatically mean "I like coffee" which really seems to be a closely-guarded secretʕ•ᴥ•ʔ). Most of the things I say can probably be found individually, mentioned in passing in one textbook or another.

What I really haven't seen is anyone bringing it together so that people can understand that Japanese adjectives aren't governed by a set of arbitrary and unconnected "rules", but in fact form a very logical and easily-understandable system.

When I realized how Japanese adjectives really work my first thought was "But why doesn't anyone explain this?"

So I set down to create the explanation I wished I'd had from the start. That was almost three years ago. This is the video of that explanation.
Edited: 2017-12-09, 2:22 pm
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