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2017 JLPT N2/N1 Thread

#26
(2017-05-31, 9:02 pm)Northern_Lord Wrote: Thanks for the tips guys!
I've tried using the Jtest4you-N2 and N3 cards, and I guess maybe they can be good for getting the spaced repitition of grammar points, but right now I feel I should look more into actually learning grammar points I don't know. I didn't know about the Kanzen series. I took a look on the internet and it seems pretty good. I'm going to pop over to a bookstore and take a look at 読解 and 文法.
For my reviews, I decided I  might have to set a cap of 100 Anki reviews per day. I only have an hour or two per day to study japanese, so really need to distribute my time as well as possible.

Shinkanzen is great - most of us here swear by it. That plus the Dictionaries of Japanese Grammar should be all you need. I'd also recommend the ドリルとドリル book for N2 - it's nothing but sample problems. It can help you get real world examples of some grammar points if you're not encountering them as part of your reading.

I like the Anki cap idea. At the N2 level and beyond, you should be immersing in native media as much as possible.
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#27
Lately I"ve really begun to like the Nihongo No Mori youtube channel for grammar explanations. I think they do a better job of explaining the differences between points than Shin Kanzen. At the same time it makes for nice listening practice. I find they cover more or less the same content as Shin Kanzen, but its just more fun to watch. The only downside is that it doesn't come with any quizzes.

The day I manage to pass N2 (when will it be....?) I plan to study N1 grammar primarily through Nihongo No Mori with Shin Kanzen and DOJG as references.
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#28
Thanks for the 日本語の森 reminder! I tried to get into them in early N2 and never did, but now I'm really digging it.
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#29
(2017-05-31, 9:42 pm)Hinsudesu Wrote: Lately I"ve really begun to like the Nihongo No Mori youtube channel for grammar explanations. I think they do a better job of explaining the differences between points than Shin Kanzen. At the same time it makes for nice listening practice. I find they cover more or less the same content as Shin Kanzen, but its just more fun to watch. The only downside is that it doesn't come with any quizzes.

Edit: I should preface this by saying that grammar has always been my worst section on the JLPT, as I tend to neglect it and focus more on reading.

When I passed N2 and N1, most of my grammar study was done simply by listening to or watching Nihongo no Mori videos. I would just watch/listen to them on a loop, coming back to them as many times as I could before I basically ran out of time. Haha. I hate studying grammar from books, so this really worked for me.
Edited: 2017-05-31, 11:05 pm
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#30
A problem I have had with Nihongonomori is that they group similar grammar points together, which sometimes makes it difficult to remember which grammar point means what. Otherwise I enjoy watching it from time to time.

@gaiaslastlaugh,
Yeah, I think it's a good idea for one deck to another. But seems it's not very good for main decks with sub-decks.
I just experienced that Anki goes sequentially through repetitions in sub-decks. So when I set max repetitions to e.g. 100 in the main deck, Anki takes me through 100 repetitions within the first few decks, and I am not shown cards from the last decks.
Edited: 2017-05-31, 11:20 pm
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#31
(2017-05-31, 11:14 pm)Northern_Lord Wrote: A problem I have had with Nihongonomori is that they group similar grammar points together, which sometimes makes it difficult to remember which grammar point means what. Otherwise I enjoy watching it from time to time.

Shinkanzen Master does the same thing, the idea being that it helps learn the differences between very similar-seeming expressions. Nihongo no Mori is a little less overwhelming in its approach.
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#32
I would strongly advise against setting a cap on daily reviews for anything other than smoothing out occasional review spikes as it undermines the SRS algorithm. If you want to control your review count it should be done by limiting what you add or suspending cards when you've added too much.

Edit: To put it bluntly, all anki's daily limit does is hide the fact that you've not completed your reviews for the day. It doesn't solve the problem. You need to take it upon yourself to ensure what you're adding is in line with how much time you're willing to commit to studying.
Edited: 2017-06-01, 1:49 am
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#33
(2017-05-31, 9:02 pm)Northern_Lord Wrote: ...
For my reviews, I decided I  might have to set a cap of 100 Anki reviews per day. I only have an hour or two per day to study japanese, so really need to distribute my time as well as possible.

I had a similar problem with anki. I had a fixed amount of time I could spend with Japanese, and found that anki was monopolizing that time. 

The way I handled this problem was by no longer adding in new cards, and letting my number of daily reviews naturally decrease to my "target" number. I might have also set a daily review cap too. But that was just a stopgap measure until the "real" number of reviews hit my target. (In my case, it was also 100).

This worked well for me. As someone else said, simply setting a cap isn't that advisable. Yes, it will solve your immediate problem of having too many reviews. But it also means that you're not making the best use of their memory algorithm.
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#34
In the end I am doing as you guys suggested, stopped adding new cards (for the most part). I bought Shinkanzen grammar and reading and am getting ready to enjoy myself with those. As I go about learning new grammar, I will activate the corresponding cards in the Jtest4you grammar decks.
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#35
(2017-06-03, 10:50 pm)Northern_Lord Wrote: In the end I am doing as you guys suggested, stopped adding new cards (for the most part). I bought Shinkanzen grammar and reading and am getting ready to enjoy myself with those. As I go about learning new grammar, I will activate the corresponding cards in the Jtest4you grammar decks.

Nice plan! 

I'm doing an Anki deck, but it's focused on kanji review, starting from Grade 1 on up. I want to strengthen my kanji knowledge, and also get to the point where I can write fluidly. Also started into the 日本語の森 videos for review. Outside of that, it's all extensive reading and listening.
Edited: 2017-06-03, 11:43 pm
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#36
(2017-06-03, 11:42 pm)gaiaslastlaugh Wrote:
(2017-06-03, 10:50 pm)Northern_Lord Wrote: In the end I am doing as you guys suggested, stopped adding new cards (for the most part). I bought Shinkanzen grammar and reading and am getting ready to enjoy myself with those. As I go about learning new grammar, I will activate the corresponding cards in the Jtest4you grammar decks.

Nice plan! 

I'm doing an Anki deck, but it's focused on kanji review, starting from Grade 1 on up. I want to strengthen my kanji knowledge, and also get to the point where I can write fluidly. Also started into the 日本語の森 videos for review. Outside of that, it's all extensive reading and listening.

It's focused on kanji review? So do you do production/recognition of single kanji? If so, what do you feel is the merit of this method? 
I practice kanji indirectly by always writing the word when I do production cards of words written in Kanji. If I fail to write it, I fail the card. Thus for some kanji, I remember how to write it, but haven't yet associated it with any specific meaning. E.g. 柔軟, where I have only seen 軟 in this one word. It's kinda laborious, but it has given nice results in the form that I can also write all Kanji I know how to read.
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