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Kanji Trans. - WWII Relics - New Items 11/4/17

#1
[Image: IMG_2032_1.jpg.html]

Looking for an English translation on the individual character shown in the picture. If it helps for context, this is a relic part to a Japanese machine gun from WWII. I suspect it has something to do with a "sight" or "post" with a possible reference to "aircraft". 

Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

Thanks!

[Image: IMG_2032_1.jpg]

Sorry, was this supposed to be posted elsewhere? It's been a while since I've posted...
Edited: 2017-11-04, 10:42 am
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#2
That's , which gets used in words for things like "undress", "take off", as a word prefix indicating reversal, removal, etc. Given the arrow my guess is it's indicating "pull this way to remove".

(PS: given the "undress" usages of the character I recommend against trying the tactic of 'google image search to see contexts and usages'...)
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#3
Ok, that's good insight. That makes sense as there is a post-type sight (I don't have it) that I believe gets inserted into a hole just above the mark. They may be saying "pull...in direction of arrow...to remove" as you indicated. 

Interesting, not what I expected...

Thanks!
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#4
(2017-01-10, 6:05 pm)pm215 Wrote: That's , which gets used in words for things like "undress", "take off", as a word prefix indicating reversal, removal, etc. Given the arrow my guess is it's indicating "pull this way to remove".

(PS: given the "undress" usages of the character I recommend against trying the tactic of 'google image search to see contexts and usages'...)

I'm a bit confused. The kanji I see in your post is obviously a completely different one to that shown in the image*, and clearly way beyond the level of font differences or confusion between two similar characters. Can you elaborate on how you know they're the same character. Is it pre-war vs post-war?

*Here's what I see. http://www.kanji-a-day.com/dictionary/ka...hp?id=1311
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#5
Did you turn the photo sideways? :-)

(Seriously, once you orient correctly, they look the same to me.)
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#6
(2017-01-11, 6:42 am)Splatted Wrote: I'm a bit confused. The kanji I see in your post is obviously a completely different one to that shown in the image*

Rotate the image 90 degrees to the right, or tilt your head to the left...now look at it againSmile
Edited: 2017-01-11, 9:46 am
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#7
Lmao I was wondering why it looked so unlike any kanji I'd ever seen before. Blush
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#8
Sorry about the orientation. I just took the pic with the arrow pointing up as I don't really know the correct orientation of the piece itself. 

So it sounds like the riddle is solved. Thanks for all the help once again. I have some more WWII parts with Kanji I'll post soon!

Thanks!
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#9
Here are two boxes of WWII-era Japanese ammunition boxes. Translation of ANY of the stampings would be great!

[Image: IMG_1862.jpg]

[Image: IMG_1861.jpg]
Edited: 2017-01-16, 4:28 pm
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#10
弾薬包 - Ammunition cartridges
一一式軽機銃 - Type 11 light machine gun
昭和一四年 ? ? 月調製 - Produced in 1939 (Shouwa 14); I can't read the month
I can't make out the next line, maybe someone else can.
拾五発 - Fifteen rounds

三八式銃實包 - Type 38 ammunition cartridges
一五発 - 15 rounds
Edited: 2017-01-16, 5:00 pm
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#11
(2017-01-16, 4:56 pm)TurtleBear Wrote: 弾薬包 - Ammunition cartridges
一一式軽機銃 - Type 11 light machine gun
昭和一四年 ? ? 月調製 - Produced in 1939 (Shouwa 14); I can't read the month
I can't make out the next line, maybe someone else can.
拾五発 - Fifteen rounds

三八式銃實包 - Type 38 ammunition cartridges
一五発 - 15 rounds

三月, march
The writing is really faint but the 三 is clear enough and it's impossible for any other month to have a 3 in it.
The 三 comes first followed by blank space, which is slightly counter-intuitive for a single digit month.
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#12
Better pic...
[Image: IMG_2101.jpg]

Thanks for all the info everyone, very helpful!
Edited: 2017-01-16, 6:51 pm
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#13
I tried to make sense of the bottom part and failed, but in case it helps someone else do a dictionary lookup, these are the kanji I think I'm seeing:
opposite Shouwa - 月調製 (that first 月 might be the one that goes with Shouwa 14 Month 3)
below Shouwa - 発板
opposite 発板 - 號
The number stamped beside 號 is definitely 336. I can't read the stamp beside 発板, and I don't know what that 月 is doing in the middle.
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#14
The bottom left I'm pretty sure is 藥板, but I don't know what it means. (It's the old form of くすり plus the normal いた, implying... a chemically active board? )

It's not in the dictionaries I have, and google searches are too smart for their own good and transform it into a Chinese character that presumably has the same meaning. Some stuff on google hits for the actual character combination showing images of machinery, but... eh. I dunno. The answer is surely out there anyway.
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#15
Here is another Japanese WWII-era item I acquired. It should be part of a tool kit related to a machine gun.  It appears some characters repeat per side. As usual, any info would be great!

[Image: IMG_2161.jpg]
[Image: IMG_2160.jpg]
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#16
銃身止スパナ
(Gun) barrel stopper spanner (aka wrench)

用心金栓スパナ
Trigger guard stopper spanner

I don't know gun terminology so I might have gotten the exact terms wrong. The second "stopper" word can also mean plug, as in something which plugs a hole up.
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#17
銃身止スパナ = barrel stop spanner
Can't think of what you call it in English, but it's the mechanism that holds the barrel into the receiver; apparently this weapon used a bolt to hold it in place, since it required a spanner to insert/remove.

用心金栓スパナ = trigger guard plug spanner
Basically, the tool you use to take out / put in the thing that makes the weapon even safer to carry around.

EDIT:
Ninja'd.

@Bokusenou
The trigger guard is the loop that goes around the trigger to avoid accidental discharge; you can further block the trigger by inserting a block into the trigger guard that prevents the trigger from being moved at all.
At least, that should be what this tool is being used on; apparently there aren't enough Japanese gun nuts to fill the Internet with quick information about these things. I can't imagine it having 栓 in the name if it were for the trigger guard itself, especially since they tend to be held on by screws and not bolts.
Edited: 2017-02-09, 10:37 pm
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#18
This is all making sense, maybe this can clarify a bit...

There is a large "nut" that sets a stop (or "lock" or "wedge" in gun terms) that secures the barrel to proper headspacing. 

There is also a nut that secures a stop (or "cross bolt") that retains the trigger frame to the main receiver of the gun.
Edited: 2017-02-09, 11:06 pm
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#19
Ah, thanks. Wouldn't have thought a safety like that would need a wrench to remove (they're usually part of the trigger assembly, aren't they?), but I'm not terribly familiar with the guts of anything bigger or more complicated than a handgun, hunting rifle, or (break action) shotgun, so...
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#20
(2017-02-09, 11:24 pm)sholum Wrote: Ah, thanks. Wouldn't have thought a safety like that would need a wrench to remove (they're usually part of the trigger assembly, aren't they?), but I'm not terribly familiar with the guts of anything bigger or more complicated than a handgun, hunting rifle, or (break action) shotgun, so...

I think, if the "trigger guard" translation is correct, it's more or less just stating the location of the nut. This nut allows for disassembly beyond field stripping for cleaning and maintenance. Not sure if "guard" and "frame" can be interchanged here but in gun-lingo that would be a more accurate description of what is actually occurring. Unless it's the former scenario, and it's just stating where the nut is located.
Edited: 2017-02-09, 11:43 pm
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#21
The 'trigger guard' part I can guarantee is correct, at least (that's the 用心金 part); it's the 'plug' (栓) part that I'm not sure of. The only thing I've found related to guns that has 栓 in it is a safety (安全栓, though it's usually the more general 安全装置).
栓 is something that stops something else from moving (especially from flowing), like a cork in a bottle, a drain plug, the pin on a grenade, the above mentioned safety, etc.

Because I can't find anything that's called 用心金栓 (at all; not a single hit on Google in Japanese), I can't really say what it is exactly. I think you're onto something with what you've been saying though.
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#22
I have a few new items here I thought I'd post to see if anyone can assist on, not even sure if all is Kanji or just some sort of Military/Manufacturer insignia, I don't even know if the orientation is correct. Again, all are WWII era weapon related parts of that helps any. 

There are four items:
1.) Sight
2.) Ammo drum
3.) Ammo drum 2
4.) Loading tool

Any thoughts are appreciated!

https://imgur.com/a/o8y7W
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#23
籵 from the sight was used for decameters. EDIT: that's ten ('deca') meters, not me failing to spell decimeters (a tenth of a meter).

The second one just seems to be 岡, which means 'hill', but might just be a manufacturer's mark.

Not sure about the third one. There seems to be another mark to the left (based on the picture's orientation), are you able to get an image of that?

I think the fourth one is just a mark, rather than a character, though there is one word that can be written similarly as a shorthand, but I can't remember what it is...
Edited: 2017-10-22, 3:38 pm
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#24
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: I think the fourth one is just a mark, rather than a character, though there is one word that can be written similarly as a shorthand, but I can't remember what it is...

締め can be written as 〆. If you rotate the image it certainly seems likely that's what it is.
Edited: 2017-10-22, 8:13 pm
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#25
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: Not sure about the third one. There seems to be another mark to the left (based on the picture's orientation), are you able to get an image of that?

The partially visible mark to the left is an "anchor" which I found to be a "naval acceptance" mark from the time of issue...that one I was able to find in a book about Japanes WWII arms.

(2017-10-22, 8:12 pm)tokyostyle Wrote:
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: I think the fourth one is just a mark, rather than a character, though there is one word that can be written similarly as a shorthand, but I can't remember what it is...

締め can be written as 〆. If you rotate the image it certainly seems likely that's what it is.

Sorry about the orientation, I figured I had a 25% chance of getting it right so the odds were not in my favor  Smile

What is the meaning of the character that you suspect it may be?
Edited: 2017-10-22, 9:11 pm
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