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Kanji Trans. - WWII Relics - New Items 11/4/17

#26
(2017-10-22, 8:12 pm)tokyostyle Wrote:
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: I think the fourth one is just a mark, rather than a character, though there is one word that can be written similarly as a shorthand, but I can't remember what it is...

締め can be written as 〆. If you rotate the image it certainly seems likely that's what it is.

Thanks! I didn't know about that symbol, TIL the word Ryakuji 「略字」 (though I knew some of them already).

One small note: the image looks like (actually, if I'm looking at it correctly, inverted -I mean like in a specular image, not just rotated-) instead of 〆 (but they both mean the same anyway).

Japanese wikipedia for 〆, 乄

English wiktionary for 〆
Unicode "Ideographic Closing Mark"

English wiktionary for 乄
Unicode "Ideographic SHIME"


EDIT
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: 籵 from the sight was used for decameters. EDIT: that's ten ('deca') meters, not me failing to spell decimeters (a tenth of a meter).

I'd say it looks more like 粁, kilometer.
Edited: 2017-10-22, 9:31 pm
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#27
(2017-10-22, 9:18 pm)faneca Wrote: One small note: the image looks like (actually, if I'm looking at it correctly, inverted -I mean like in a specular image, not just rotated-) instead of 〆 (but they both mean the same anyway).

Wow, I've seen 乄 used a LOT more in hand writing but I did not realize there were two unicode points for each of them. Thanks! I definitely agree its that style as well.

(2017-10-22, 9:08 pm)Gorgosaurus Wrote: What is the meaning of the character that you suspect it may be?

Meanings range from: shut, close, seal, end, and even total. Probably only someone familiar with how they were manufactured knows the real answer.
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#28
(2017-10-22, 9:18 pm)faneca Wrote:
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: 籵 from the sight was used for decameters. EDIT: that's ten ('deca') meters, not me failing to spell decimeters (a tenth of a meter).

I'd say it looks more like 粁, kilometer.

Looking at it again, I think you're right. That top line is right at the edge of the metal, and is completely missing from the 300 mark (missed it when stamping, I guess), so I didn't even think of that. Decameters seemed like a weird unit to use, but...
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#29
(2017-10-22, 9:18 pm)faneca Wrote:
(2017-10-22, 8:12 pm)tokyostyle Wrote:
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: I think the fourth one is just a mark, rather than a character, though there is one word that can be written similarly as a shorthand, but I can't remember what it is...

締め can be written as 〆. If you rotate the image it certainly seems likely that's what it is.

Thanks! I didn't know about that symbol, TIL the word Ryakuji 「略字」 (though I knew some of them already).

One small note: the image looks like (actually, if I'm looking at it correctly, inverted -I mean like in a specular image, not just rotated-) instead of 〆 (but they both mean the same anyway).

Japanese wikipedia for 〆, 乄

English wiktionary for 〆
Unicode "Ideographic Closing Mark"

English wiktionary for 乄
Unicode "Ideographic SHIME"


EDIT
(2017-10-22, 3:36 pm)sholum Wrote: 籵 from the sight was used for decameters. EDIT: that's ten ('deca') meters, not me failing to spell decimeters (a tenth of a meter).

I'd say it looks more like 粁, kilometer.

Kilometer would make sense. It's an anti-aircraft sight so it would indicate which ring to use depending on the speed of the target, which would be measured as km/hr, and the outer most ring at 400 would be relatively accurate as a top speed. 

Thanks!
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#30
The thought of an aircraft gun having a range of 400km really had me confused... but your explanation is perfect Gorgosaurus. Thanks for following up with these interesting relics!
Edited: 2017-10-24, 5:44 pm
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#31
Here's another set...can't seem to find either of these characters from previous inquiries. Assuming it refers to some type of measurement...

https://i.imgur.com/GpCzz77.jpg

...and another...

https://i.imgur.com/5rqbgwL.jpg
Edited: 2017-11-04, 10:49 am
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#32
First image:
Can't find anything on the second character, but it's some kind of scale (1 division = ?). Can't see what the top number is on the fraction, but it's thousandths of something. Can anyone see what those other things are?

Second image:
To the right, I'm seeing 高射ニ
To the left, I'm seeing ニ射平

IF that's the case AND they're meant to be read in the direction of their arrows (i.e. the one on the left is written backwards), then turning that to the right increases the angle of the barrel (I'm assuming this is a large gun, maybe anti-air?) while turning it to the left decreases it.
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#33
(2017-11-04, 1:15 pm)sholum Wrote: First image:
Can't find anything on the second character, but it's some kind of scale (1 division = ?).

I think the kanji word is supposed to be 分劃, with the second character simplified in a way that's unconventional nowadays (it's normally simplified to 画, just like 畫). Not sure what the whole thing is supposed to mean.
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#34
The first picture it looks like an angular measure. According to Wikipedia https://ja.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ミル_(角度)

English version: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milliradian

So 1分 is a milliradian. The 1分 1/1000 just means 1 part (gradation most likely) is 1/1000 of a radian
Edited: 2017-11-05, 2:07 pm
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#35
(2017-11-04, 1:15 pm)sholum Wrote: Second image:
To the right, I'm seeing 高射ニ
To the left, I'm seeing ニ射平

IF that's the case AND they're meant to be read in the direction of their arrows (i.e. the one on the left is written backwards), then turning that to the right increases the angle of the barrel (I'm assuming this is a large gun, maybe anti-air?) while turning it to the left decreases it.

This does indeed make sense. These are the release knobs that switch the gun mount from "ground" mode to "anti-aircraft" mode.

Thanks!


(2017-11-05, 1:53 pm)juniperpansy Wrote: The first picture it looks like an angular measure. According to Wikipedia https://ja.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ミル_(角度)

English version: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milliradian

So 1分 is a milliradian. The 1分 1/1000 just means 1 part (gradation most likely) is 1/1000 of a radian

That would make sense as the markings are on a track that pivots on an axis so its movements could certainly be measured in radians. 

Thanks!
Edited: 2017-11-05, 5:42 pm
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