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Variant of 誤 ?? Does anyone know it?

#1
I was just reviewing some vocabulary in Anki, and thought I found an unknown (to me) kanji. 
When I looked it up however (and saw the hiragana/meaning), it was just 誤り (あやまり /mistake), but the kanji looked different: The right side had "口" over "天" (like in 俣).

Does anyone recognize this? 

I'm guessing this is just a simnplification for small fonts or something (?), because when i copy and paste the character it looks "normal". But as I can't find this variant on jisho.org I am more than a little confused (I even excluded the possibility that a chinese simplified character creeped into my font, because that would be "误", i.e. the left side "road simplification" (?) would never appear in a japanese character)

I would be grateful for any insight or information on the subject!

all the best,
Rinre

Edit: fixed formating issues
Edited: 2016-10-21, 5:53 am
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#2
(2016-10-21, 5:51 am)rinre Wrote: I was just reviewing some vocabulary in Anki, and thought I found an unknown (to me) kanji. 
When I looked it up however (and saw the hiragana/meaning), it was just 誤り (あやまり /mistake), but the kanji looked different: The right side had "口" over "天" (like in 俣).

You can see form variants for this character on Wiktionary.

You can ensure Anki displays Japanese kanji forms by adjusting the template for your cards. Specify the HTML "lang" attribute for the text as "ja". (This is how Wiktionary displays the glyph variants despite the characters all having the same Unicode code point.)

There's no need to change your system language or specify a specific Japanese font in Anki; you can specify serif for Mincho-style or sans-serif for Gothic-style.
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#3
Thanks for your reply!

I did change my basic fonts and settings a while ago so that my computer shows japanese characters. I'm sorry if I wasn't clear about that.
Thanks though for the tips regarding anki, that helps a lot Smile
This kanji showed up in a downloaded shared deck wth a specified font,so it ended up being enough to change the “note type”(? Or whatever it's called) to my normal one.

The main question remains though,does anyone recognize this character variant?
I had already checked the linked wiktionary page, and the fact that I can neither find this variant there nor in online dictionaries is what confuses me (usually jisho.org has even the most obscure variants) .

As I said,the character had 言 on the left (like 誤), but the same right side as "俣". Sound familiar to anyone?
is it a common inofficial simplification of "呉" maybe? (The "口" over "天" element/primitive that is)

All the best,
Rinre
Edited: 2016-10-24, 4:13 pm
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#4
I did a bit of digging with different fonts and so far the only font that describes that your exact variation is the font "Code2000"

Here is a screenshot of a word document with the kanji and their font names in size 48.

[Image: cbZq9iK.png]

You can download the font free, here.

Hope this helps.
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#5
(2016-10-24, 3:58 pm)rinre Wrote: The main question remains though,does anyone recognize this character variant?
I had already checked the linked wiktionary page, and the fact that I can neither find this variant there nor in online dictionaries is what confuses me (usually jisho.org has even the most obscure variants) .

As I said,the character had  on the left (like 誤), but the same right side as "俣". Sound familiar to anyone?
is it a common inofficial simplification of "呉" maybe? (The "口" over "天" element/primitive that is)


All the best,
Rinre
No, that is not a Japanese word or acceptable font at all.
繁体字 簡体字 新字体 対照表
http://jgrammar.life.coocan.jp/ja/tools/ksimple.htm

誤  Traditional Chinese (zh-Taiwan) use Chinese_BIG5 (PMingLiu) 
误  Simplified Chinese  (zh-China) 

[Image: chinese%20hanzi.jpg]
(言+"口" over "天")  Traditional Chinese (HSK Level 4) use Chinese_GB2312 (NSimSun)
wù  Mandarin Pinyin
ng6 Jyutping Cantonese

English Definition:
mistake / error / to miss / to harm / to delay / to neglect / mistakenly

https://www.mdbg.net/chindict/chindict.php?cdqrad=149

When the font type is change from Chinese_BIG5 (PMingLiu) to Chinese_GB2312 (NSimSun) which is, GBK characters it will display that particular font, which is use in HSK Level 4.
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#6
Thanks RawrPk for your research, and thank you eslang for your thorough and conclusive answer!
You really know your stuff!
I'm very happy to know for sure that it isn't japanese, and that I can trust the dictionaries to know all the relevant variants Smile
(Come to think of it, there were a few other strange details in that font, which weren't really consistent with the old forms of japanese characters, but as it confused me that it didn't look like simplified chinese at all).

Thanks also for the links, I'm sure that will come in handy in the future!

(If I only knew what those Unicode guys were thinking as they created this mess, it would be like a balm for my soul! Wink )

Thanks again and all the best!
Rinre
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#7
(2016-10-25, 4:42 pm)rinre Wrote: (If I only knew what those Unicode guys were thinking as they created this mess, it would be like a balm for my soul! Wink )

Apparently they weren't thinking....
Or maybe they were thinking that nobody would ever use Chinese and Japanese on the same computer. I mean, it's not like anyone would take an interest in Asian languages in general or that China and Japan are neighboring countries with tons of financial and cultural interactions. Nah, nothing like that.
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#8
(2016-10-25, 9:17 pm)SomeCallMeChris Wrote:
(2016-10-25, 4:42 pm)rinre Wrote: (If I only knew what those Unicode guys were thinking as they created this mess, it would be like a balm for my soul! Wink )

Apparently they weren't thinking....
Or maybe they were thinking that nobody would ever use Chinese and Japanese on the same computer. I mean, it's not like anyone would take an interest in Asian languages in general or that China and Japan are neighboring countries with tons of financial and cultural interactions. Nah, nothing like that.

But didn't you know that everyone in the world is monolingual? There's no reason to make multi-language compatibility easy when no one would ever use it, right? So let's just assign all of these glyphs to the same address and be done with it.
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#9
I think Han Unification in Unicode was a mistake, but it's not like they did it by accident or without thinking at all (this is their official rationale). I think there's a combination of:
* not unifying would result in using an enormous number of codepoints, which was more important back when it looked like Unicode would be able to fit in a 16-bit character space. My guess is this was the major driver
* if you don't unify at all then you get quite a lot of really-genuinely-identical characters, and it's not clear whether that's a good idea
* bleedover from the general idea that Unicode doesn't encode "font level differences" (like different ways to draw lower case 'a'), and it doesn't split out "latin alphabet for English" from "latin alphabet for German" and so on
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#10
I know there was rationale behind it, but when the entire point of the project is to make multi-language compatibility easy (one code, versus trying to use all sorts of encodes on the same site), you'd think such wild differences between Han characters would've screamed "This is not unifiable!"

It's one thing to have the character 'a' represented in a way that no one I know actually writes, because it's still very clearly 'a'; it's not like it suddenly becomes ア when you change between (normal) fonts.
'l' and 'I', on the other hand... Whoever thought a sans-serif capital 'i' needed to exist this way was an idiot. I refuse to submit a paper without a proper capital 'i', which leaves me with certain unappealing serif characters as well (at least you can tell them apart)... Can't win with fonts unless you make your own, I guess...

Well, I guess it's a matter of hindsight at this point, but it's certainly made handling East Asian text a pain, compared to what it could've been.
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#11
(2016-10-26, 8:14 pm)sholum Wrote: 'l' and 'I', on the other hand... Whoever thought a sans-serif capital 'i' needed to exist this way was an idiot. I refuse to submit a paper without a proper capital 'i', which leaves me with certain unappealing serif characters as well (at least you can tell them apart)... Can't win with fonts unless you make your own, I guess...

Try 'Tahoma' or 'Verdana'. Those two at least appear to have crossbars on the I.
(Incidentally, the font this forum displays in has crossbars on the I for me, the inspector says it looks for Tahoma and Verdana first.)
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#12
(2016-10-26, 8:51 pm)SomeCallMeChris Wrote:
(2016-10-26, 8:14 pm)sholum Wrote: 'l' and 'I', on the other hand... Whoever thought a sans-serif capital 'i' needed to exist this way was an idiot. I refuse to submit a paper without a proper capital 'i', which leaves me with certain unappealing serif characters as well (at least you can tell them apart)... Can't win with fonts unless you make your own, I guess...

Try 'Tahoma' or 'Verdana'. Those two at least appear to have crossbars on the I.
(Incidentally, the font this forum displays in has crossbars on the I for me, the inspector says it looks for Tahoma and Verdana first.)

I'll go download those then, since I always get something that looks like Calibri on here.
Thanks!
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#13
Oh, the forum only has crossbars on the 'I' in the edit window, I just realized. That's unfortunate.
And a little strange that the edit font is different from the display font. (Not realllllly relevant, but I couldn't help but notice.)
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