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How to study journal corrections and recorded Skpe conversations?

#1
I want to go back and learn from the mistakes pointed out in my Japanese journals and Skype conversations, but I'm not sure how to deal with all the information (and the dread of second-hand embarrassment for my past self). I am looking for advice on how you deal with using your corrections to improve, instead of letting that info collect dust in a desktop folder.
Note: I usually write sentences/vocab on Google Docs and reread them a lot cause it seems less painless to me, I haven't used Anki in forever. Dunno if that's helpful info or not.

Skype: I take 1 hour lessons, record the audio, and save any text written in the chat.
Problem: If I have a lesson lined up each day, it's really hard for me to juggle studying the previous lesson and preparing for the upcoming lesson. The teachers usually write down new words in the chat, but I know I need to listen to the audio again to check pronunciation and info that wasn't written down. But I'm embarrassed about having to hear parts when I get flustered and struggle in Japanese and think, "This took an hour to record. It'll take 3x as long to actually study this!" @@; 
(I usually take classes at some graveyard shift hour and select my own topics to study. I prefer conversation-type learning and the vocab we talk about matches how I need to describe things going on in my life, so the corrections/vocab are really important for me to learn.)

Japanese writing (Lang-8, italki, pen pal emails): I usually get a lot of corrections per journal, but it's mostly small stuff like using the wrong particle or wrong tense of a verb (unless I have no idea how to write about a difficult topic). For Lang-8, I tried to paste my journal with all of the corrections under each sentence, but it was hard because each person corrected it differently and it was taking a long time to arrange. And it was honestly erm, humbling, to see all the errors building up from so many journals (I know that's illogical because I've had more real-time embarrassing moments, so I think my worry is an excuse). I was spending more time arranging things and highlighting errors than actually studying them.

Any ideas? I know part of it is manning up and just doing it, but I don't know where to start!
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#2
I face the same thing. One thing that helps a little is that I largely stopped using lang-8, and instead I am bringing what I write to a teacher to have her correct. As you noted, because there are many ways to say the same thing, you're going to get various input from different people on how to correct things, or what the most "natural" way is to say something. Getting input from a single source that I trust is a lot less embarrassing, and helps me by narrowing down feedback to a single source. 

I've also taken to saving my corrections (I save them on LingQ, but you can save them in Google Docs or locally) and I use them as a reference when I'm writing something new, rather than studying them out of context and hoping they stick.
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#3
I recommend the MCD format for SRSing if you SRS.
this is my example for example
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/3240296319

you can make the blank part as short or long as you want. I find blanking out a single syllable is sometimes very helpful and way more effective than a traditional front/back format card.
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#4
gaiaslastlaugh: I usually write on Lang-8 for like a week straight and then give up, it feels like homework. >_< Sticking with the same person/teacher seems like a great idea. I was wondering, though, do you have your teacher correct your sentences in real time or do you send it to them ahead of time or something? As for the LingQ part, I don't have a subscription to that, but maybe if I save a master list of topics related to daily life, I could paste important sentences to study.

howtwosavealif3: I have never heard of the MCD format, very interesting! Usually, I highlight my trouble words in red, but maybe if I made flashcards with Anki in this way or at least highlight the trouble words in white on Google docs to "hide" them, that would be similarly effective.
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#5
If you're gonna do mcd I highly recommend experimenting with blanking stuff out like blankin out one syllable or everything but the first syllable or making multiple cards for one sentence or word. I've gotten down it for myself and I usually blank out just the right amount so that anki is as fast and effortless as possible while being effective. If you think about it you're going "do" the traditional front back format quizzing in production or comprehension in the "wild" (unless you're putting something really obscure) so it makes no sense to overexert yourself with that rigid front back format in anki. I can tell you from experience certain things I would've never retained with the traditional format
Edited: 2016-07-15, 5:25 pm
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#6
(2016-07-15, 3:46 pm)haley_usa Wrote: gaiaslastlaugh: I usually write on Lang-8 for like a week straight and then give up, it feels like homework. >_< Sticking with the same person/teacher seems like a great idea. I was wondering, though, do you have your teacher correct your sentences in real time or do you send it to them ahead of time or something? As for the LingQ part, I don't have a subscription to that, but maybe if I save a master list of topics related to daily life, I could paste important sentences to study.

I usually send it before as "completed homework", and then my teacher gives me her thoughts and corrections during the lesson. 

LingQ isn't necessary - it's just a tool I like to use because it provides a convenient way to study the words I don't know in context. I like it more than Anki or a similar SRS, which usually drives me to boredom after a few weeks.
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#7
(2016-07-15, 5:22 pm). howtwosavealif3 Wrote: If you're gonna do mcd I highly recommend experimenting with blanking stuff out like blankin out one syllable or everything but the first syllable or making multiple cards for one sentence or word. I've gotten down it for myself and I usually blank out just the right amount so that anki is as fast and effortless as possible while being effective. If you think about it you're going "do" the traditional front back format quizzing in production or comprehension in the "wild" (unless you're putting something really obscure) so it makes no sense to overexert yourself with that rigid front back format in anki. I can tell you from experience certain things I would've never retained with the traditional format

Can you give an example of how you setup your flashcards? I'm curious. I would like to do closed deletes but they do get too hard for me over time and a compromise sounds good
Edited: 2016-07-16, 9:13 am
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#8
http://forum.koohii.com/thread-9148.html
I posted more examples on this thread and I also do the format of
Front: word or sentence with the definition then blank out the part of the word or sentence and leave the definition intact
Back : blanked part

片手でつかんだら へなりと
く_____った



幾度もくりかえして折れ曲がる。

Back :ね

Btw this sentence is about an envelope of anyone is curious
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