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Remembering Kanji

#1
Interested to hear your thoughts on how you all remember how to write Kanji.

Do you:

A. Write them over and over to remember them?

B. Analyse radicals to give the Kanji meaning?

C. Use an image to symbolise a Kanji

D. Fluke it?!

Personally I do both A, B, C, and D haha.

Josh.
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#2
(2016-05-31, 3:43 am)josharoo Wrote: Interested to hear your thoughts on how you all remember how to write Kanji.

Do you:

A. Write them over and over to remember them?

B. Analyse radicals to give the Kanji meaning?

C. Use an image to symbolise a Kanji

D. Fluke it?!

Personally I do both A, B, C, and D haha.

Josh.

In my case I did an intensive Heisig course throughout his book 1 and now the 2.
I have learned that it is actually really helpful to assign mnemonics and stories to every single character, for eventually they fade away and the character itself remains.
After you finish just keep doing the repetitions until you star Remembering The Kanji 2. Once you start with the vocabulary I believe it is not really important to remember the english meaning.

Hope it helped in some way!
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#3
(2016-05-31, 3:43 am)josharoo Wrote: Interested to hear your thoughts on how you all remember how to write Kanji.

Do you:

A. Write them over and over to remember them?

B. Analyse radicals to give the Kanji meaning?

C. Use an image to symbolise a Kanji

D. Fluke it?!

Personally I do both A, B, C, and D haha.

Josh.


I memorized the most common radicals or pieces using mnemonics. I used somewhat standard imagery that reflected their true meanings or I made up a bunch based on how the appear. My sources were the Kanji Damage site and some other site that encouraged learners to "learn the parts not the strokes." You'll find that sometimes kanji is creative and there a slight bend here or an added stroke there. In those cases I  used my existing imagery and modified them a bit. So instead of foot, it was a bent foot, or instead of rope it was a coated rope. 

After that was all done I started on the kanji. I used to simply create stories like the ones here on koohii. But only doing that, I forgot them quite often. It was like throwing a few hundred socks of different colors and patterns into  a dresser with no organization, and on Monday when I wanted to wear a specific pair of socks, well, I often picked the wrong one or had no idea where I it had left it. Recall, which is necessary for writing, was hard or near impossible for me so now I use memory palaces and koohii style stories to remember how to write.  I can write them because I know exactly "where" each kanji (and story components) is. 

Writing over and over in a notebook for me was a complete fail for the purposes of remembering. However, it was quite helpful for beautifying my handwriting.


 To sum up my methods for remembering how to write kanji:  
1. memorize the radicals by using imagery and SRS. (memory palaces could be used for this, but I didn't use them)
2. memorize the kanji by using personal stories for each kanji, using the imagery from step one along with and memory palaces and SRS.  Write them out when using SRS. At first when writing you'll need to go through the story in your head to remember how to write them. But as Aristi noted, some will fade away over time and you just write them. 

Last note. Why should you care about my methods? You don't need to actually. Try them if you'd like to. It's just what I've used and it's been the best thing for me after trying various methods and failing many times. Also, I'm not a insane learn- 100-a-day kind of guy. I average about 5 a day.
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#4
I use method 'B', mostly. I use Heisig's primitives, which goes beyond the standard radicals, plus I make up additional primitives as needed. For example, house + celery + animal legs appeared in consecutive kanji, so I named it 'cartoon mouse' (imagining it in my house trying to steal a celery stick).
 
Additionally, I use the review on Kanji Koohii to identify which kanji I have trouble with, then write the keywords down and keep that list in my pocket, so I can review that for a few days. Sometimes I just have to come up with a better story for the kanji. I know I have a good one if it makes me smile.
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