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Learning The Japanese Keyboard

#26
zurisu Wrote:You can enable typing in the answer in Anki! Smile Check out this handy YouTube video about how to do it: Anki 2: Typing in the Answer
Hey! It worked! Thanks!
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#27
So what I just did was modified "Kanji Look & Learn Part 1" in Anki so that the ON and kun readings appear, and the kanji is a type: field. So, it appears like this;

Displays On and kun readings plus meaning
[Image: 50pg.jpg]

Type in the corresponding kanji
[Image: tso5.jpg]

Click "Show Answer" to reveal a correct/incorrect answer. (correct is shown in green)
[Image: c1x8.jpg]

Incorrect answers are shown in red and the correct answer is then given
[Image: ht0c.jpg]

And looks like I can modify to input for On readings where kanji is displayed.
[Image: imr3.jpg]

NOW we're getting somewhere.
Edited: 2013-08-28, 10:04 am
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#28
Well, that took quite a while to finally get done. I installed the Core 2k/6k Optimized Japanese Vocabulary with pictures and audio. However, I wanted to integrate typing in the kana/kanji too. I basically swapped the {{Vocabulary-Furigana}} with {{type:Vocabulary-Kanji}} since the nice person who put together this deck happened to put kana in the kanji field too should there be no kanji to be put in such as with これ、それ、etc. Now I've got my typing-vocabularly anki flash cards, along with kanji flash cards. Nice.

Input kana, then convert to kanji
[Image: ow4.png]

After Show Answer
[Image: q89q.png]

Input kana
[Image: kuo7.png]

After Show Answer
[Image: bul9.png]

The ultra-nice thing about this is that the deck provides visual and audio feedback. Definitely a nice touch!
Edited: 2013-08-29, 3:55 pm
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#29
Yes, it's an awesome deck ^_^

Hey, you know you can also change the font size of the typing input? It looks a little small, so I don't know if you knew you could change it.
Just go to the Fields options of your deck and change the font size of the "Vocabulary-Kanji" field by clicking on it and then increasing the size.
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#30
zurisu Wrote:Hey, you know you can also change the font size of the typing input? It looks a little small, so I don't know if you knew you could change it.
Just go to the Fields options of your deck and change the font size of the "Vocabulary-Kanji" field by clicking on it and then increasing the size.
NICE! I've been trying to increase the size through the Cards option, but it wasn't working. Now I know why! Thanks!

I also updated two of the images above to reflect the change from the smaller font to the larger font size. This should help out a lot of people who may be unfamiliar with the option.
Edited: 2013-08-29, 3:56 pm
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#31
I switched over to kana input about 4 months ago mainly due to issues with RSI I was getting while inputting Japanese flashcards from my textbook. I took a bit of a speed hit, but it's not really too bad since hitting 1 key in kana input is like hitting 2 keys in romaji input.

My RSI when typing Japanese has pretty much vanished completely. Learning to use F10/F11 to access number keys took a bit longer than it should have, but all-in-all I'm pretty satisfied with it.

One of my elderly students uses kana input, but nobody else I know does. That's fine. I realize almost nobody uses it, but I find it really useful.
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#32
erlog Wrote:I switched over to kana input about 4 months ago mainly due to issues with RSI I was getting while inputting Japanese flashcards from my textbook. I took a bit of a speed hit, but it's not really too bad since hitting 1 key in kana input is like hitting 2 keys in romaji input.

My RSI when typing Japanese has pretty much vanished completely. Learning to use F10/F11 to access number keys took a bit longer than it should have, but all-in-all I'm pretty satisfied with it.

One of my elderly students uses kana input, but nobody else I know does. That's fine. I realize almost nobody uses it, but I find it really useful.
That's fantastic! Yeah, I've found that I, too, have taken a "speed-hit" in typing kana-input, but I am very satisfied with this way of learning the Japanese language. I know it's going to be slow on the learning process, but through practice in typing-tutors, and writing to friends overseas my speeds will increase the more often I use it in other areas of my life. I, personally, don't know if I would phase out my romaji-input skills just because if I happen to move to Japan and have to type using romaji-input, it'll probably come in handy. Though, at home, definitely going to be using kana-input. I didn't know you use the F10/F11 keys to access number keys. I usually just hit the
半角/全角 key to toggle number keys. Though, I guess it depends on the keyboard type and IME setup.
One of the things I try to promote is that popularity does not dictate the usefulness of any tool. How we use the tools we have determines our outcome, popular and unpopular alike.
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#33
madkracker6969 Wrote:That's fantastic! Yeah, I've found that I, too, have taken a "speed-hit" in typing kana-input, but I am very satisfied with this way of learning the Japanese language.
Huh? Typing using Kana input is hardly "learning the Japanese language", its simply learning another keyboard layout.

Which is fine, if that's what you want to do. I tried using kana input for a while on my Japanese laptop and it didn't take too long before I was getting faster and faster, its just practice after all. I was only learning it though to become more efficient at the "Typing of the dead" game ...
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#34
NightSky Wrote:Huh? Typing using Kana input is hardly "learning the Japanese language", its simply learning another keyboard layout.
I'm not just learning to type kana-input layout to learn the Japanese language as a whole, but also kana retention, kana comprehension, and kana recall. Not only that, but I'm using my kana-input keyboard to input kana, convert it to kanji in Anki flash cards to study and learn the language by forcing myself to literally type out in kana the kanji and vocabulary repeatedly. It's not strictly repetition either since the flash cards progress deeper into the language itself. Also, if you would have read the above posts of mine, you'd realize that's the intended purpose. The kana-input isn't "learning the Japanese language" totally, it's a tool used to learn the Japanese language.

It's an immersion technique. One of many I've integrated into my daily life.
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#35
So, after a few trials, it looks like the top-row is pretty difficult in hitting the right keys, although, with relatively few errors and more practice I foresee eventually being able to type kana pretty fast.
I have noticed an increase in my typing speed over the above, home, and bottom rows though. Each week I end up getting just a little faster.
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#36
I don't think that using the kana-keyboard layout is any more immersive than using romaji input layout. I just hit a row key and then a vowel key and a few other rules (I type 'ta ti tu te to' for 'たちつてと', for example, which makes it hard for me to type in a more phonetic romaji style when talking to new learners, but it's part of my thinking in Japanese so tough luck for them! They can learn to read my style or die trying! Mwahahahaha! Ahem.)

On the other hand, I generally hit two keys when a kana keyboard layout generally hits one. Sometimes we're both hitting two keys - for ばびぶべぼ it's either row/vowel or base-kana/voicing, but either way it's 2 keys.

If you plan to type in Japanese a lot, kana layout will be more efficient, but I don't believe for a moment that it's more immersive.
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#37
SomeCallMeChris Wrote:If you plan to type in Japanese a lot, kana layout will be more efficient, but I don't believe for a moment that it's more immersive.
You don't have to believe that it's "more immersive". I've never made such a claim nor will I. It's just one more tool in the tool-box. It all depends on how everyone puts the tools they have to work.
So, a good question would be, "which is more important, the hammer or the screwdriver?" The answer is both and neither at the same time. They both have their strengths and weaknesses, and depending on how they are leveraged will determine their usefulness and/or uselessness to their user.

The Japanese keyboard has its strengths and weaknesses. It depends on how the user puts it to use that will determine its effectiveness in learning. For me, direct computer-based language training works best. I can hear, see, and touch in order to listen, read, and type the Japanese language repeatedly. I even have feedback software so that incorrect answers are fed back and recorded so progress can be ascertained as well as constant reviews of the material.

To me, whether the Japanese kana-input keyboard is useful or not depends on how you intend to use the Japanese language. I intend to read and type in Japanese so using a kana-input keyboard, kana-input computer-based language software, and other feedback programs will increase my ability to effectively and efficiently learn Japanese in the manner in which I intend to use it, and coincides with my dominant environment; my computer workstation. Should I go further and decide I will need to speak Japanese to other Japanese people, other tools suited for that purpose will be required and then be employed, perhaps even integrated to work with other tools. I'm not favoring the Japanese kana-keyboard by any means, I'm simply leveraging it's benefits best-suited towards my objective outcome using my dominant environment. So, in respects to thinking the Japanese kana-input keyboard is "more immersive", only in-so-far as writing the Japanese language using a Japanese "calligraphy" pen. I can just as easily write Japanese using a standard ball-point pen, but what pen is best for writing Japanese "calligraphy" if Japanese calligraphy is what I am intent on learning?
Of course, in the end, all I can ever do is inform you of my decision. What you and anyone else does with the information I provide is entirely up to you and them. What you choose is your choice.

You and others may be interested in the website link: Your "Minimum Effective Dose" of Learning Japanese.
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#38
What I have found through rigorous training and practice is that each time we leave our work-station, or our training area(s), we need something, somewhere to come back to. To pick up where we left off, refresh us on what we've done, and use what we've learned to literally 'step' up the ladder of learning. If you know what happens to muscles when they don't get the nominal amount of training and exercise, what happens to your mind when you aren't using what you've learned? It is at a constant inertial rate of decay, or apathy, whereas muscles are in a constant inertial rate of atrophy. What it comes down to then, is a numbers game. So long as your hours of training performance are greater than your hours of decay where you aren't performing what you've learned, that is the only way to grain ground in retention, and comprehension for recall and expression.
This is the spirit or essence behind immersion.
Just typing away at a keyboard isn't going to improve my Japanese much, but it can become an effective tool in learning the language. I've already incorporated Anki and modified some flash cards so I have to type in the kana, convert it to kanji, and practice doing this vigilantly and diligently each and every day. However, if I don't use what I've learned, typing kana non-formal/formal papers, messages on websites; and reading kanji as it should be pronounced, then the slope tilts in favor of apathy. All that I will have learned will be merely a waste of time.
So the two other things for me to look for now, objectively, would be eBooks/websites with and without furigana in order to continue my training and learning of the Japanese language. The keyboard will assist me in communicating what I've learned to other students of Japanese, and forums while reading eBooks/websites with and without furigana will boost my training and learning by elevating exposure time to the language; immersion.
One thing I recently found is that there are some J-Dramas out there with Japanese subtitles. I can literally watch, read, and hear the Japanese language all at the same time. So there is also an entertainment value in learning the Japanese language. I believe the name of the show was みんな!エスパーだよ!
Well, just some food for thought in our mutual pursuit to learn and practice the Japanese language, 思いませんか?
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#39
I just recently was able to make the leap to rkTTT. Now I can also begin typing vocabulary words, some of which I already know from Anki and my other studies. It's great! It feels like a puzzle that is slowly coming together by bringing the pieces together! I'm loving it!
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#40
(2013-08-22, 1:12 pm)madkracker6969 Wrote: NOTE: Already, something I noticed is that the IME pops out of the program, and you must press enter after each input. FIX: Install "Japanese Keyboard" inside IME. Options>Settings>General tab>Add>Japanese (Japan)>Keyboard>Japanese "check box". Click "OK", "APPLY", "OK", and then select "Japanese" keyboard icon under red circle icon "Microsoft IME" from IME toolbar.
Hm, do you know how to do this for Windows 10?
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#41
It is pretty similar for Windows 10, I just tested it with a fresh install.

Click on the Start Menu (windows logo in the bottom left)
Click on Settings (should be in the left column, just above the power options to shutdown your computer)
From the Settings menu, Click on "Time and Language"
From the Time and Language menu, select "Region and Language " (Should be second option down on the left menu column)
In the Region and Language menu, select the "+" (plus) button to add a language.  (The plus button should be on the right side menu, about middle of the page)
In the language selection menu, scroll to the right to get to Japanese.

The Microsoft IME should be working and now you can close the window.  You should see "ENG" in the bottom right (next to the system clock)

The keyboard shortcuts seem to be the same as Windows 7 and 8.
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