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檸檬【レモン】A Fun Short Story

#1
Here's a cute little short story I think learners of all levels can appreciate. Enjoy! Big Grin

http://www.aozora.gr.jp/cards/000074/fil...19826.html
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#2
Interesting! Thanks for sharing. I actually think it's pretty difficult, but maybe more because it is so stream-of-consciousness. I would understand the words but not understand the point.

The plot summary here may explain why. :-) (Not the best plot summary, really, but I guess it captures the point.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemon_(short_story)

It was interesting to read about the cultural background of the story and how people responded to it.
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#3
That was a fun read, thanks for the tip risu_.

Contained the word アッレグロ (in furi) - first time I've encountered such an oddly placed ッ.
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#4
Another short story I enjoyed from an author mostly known for his depressing works. Interestingly most Japanese read this as a middle school text.

http://www.aozora.gr.jp/cards/000035/fil...14913.html
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#5
(2017-03-10, 10:36 pm)risu_ Wrote: Another short story I enjoyed from an author mostly known for his depressing works. Interestingly most Japanese read this as a middle school text.

http://www.aozora.gr.jp/cards/000035/fil...14913.html

Thank you for sharing, risu, I'm bookmarking these to read later.

How do you know what stories are read by Japanese in middle school? Are there lists/curricula out there, or is it just a matter of anecdotal evidence? 

In the US there is a great deal of variety in what shows up in school curricula, although I'm sure we could collectively come up with a list of likely suspects. (I remember reading a Sherlock Holmes story, although I probably only remember it because I already loved Conan Doyle and it felt like cheating to be assigned it as school reading.) In Japan, is the curriculum for literature as fixed as the regimen for learning kanji?
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#6
(2017-03-11, 9:06 am)tanaquil Wrote: Thank you for sharing, risu, I'm bookmarking these to read later.

How do you know what stories are read by Japanese in middle school? Are there lists/curricula out there, or is it just a matter of anecdotal evidence? 

In the US there is a great deal of variety in what shows up in school curricula, although I'm sure we could collectively come up with a list of likely suspects. (I remember reading a Sherlock Holmes story, although I probably only remember it because I already loved Conan Doyle and it felt like cheating to be assigned it as school reading.) In Japan, is the curriculum for literature as fixed as the regimen for learning kanji?

About a year and a half ago, I posted a reading list from elementary school to high school on this thread.
Most of the ones, I found tended to be similar to the links I posted.
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#7
Thank you! Alas, the link to the HS document seems to be dead, but I snagged copies of the lists for elementary and middle school, which will be more my speed anyway.
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#8
(2017-03-11, 10:44 am)tanaquil Wrote: Thank you! Alas, the link to the HS document seems to be dead, but I snagged copies of the lists for elementary and middle school, which will be more my speed anyway.

Here should be an updated one: http://www.pref.kanagawa.jp/cnt/f360812/
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#9
(2017-03-11, 9:06 am)tanaquil Wrote: How do you know what stories are read by Japanese in middle school? Are there lists/curricula out there, or is it just a matter of anecdotal evidence? 

In the US there is a great deal of variety in what shows up in school curricula, although I'm sure we could collectively come up with a list of likely suspects. (I remember reading a Sherlock Holmes story, although I probably only remember it because I already loved Conan Doyle and it felt like cheating to be assigned it as school reading.) In Japan, is the curriculum for literature as fixed as the regimen for learning kanji?

I dunno, I just know this from reading about Japanese lit on the internet somehow. I'm quite sure that most Japanese are required to read the classics like Kokoro and such. It's the same way I know that in the US The Catcher In The Rye and The Great Gatsby would probably be on a reading list.
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