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My little 2017 lower intermediate thread

#1
A big reason I made progress with Japanese last year was I created a thread here to mark my progress, and a bunch of friendly people joined to support me and mark their own progress.

That thread was focused around the N3 exam, which I wound up not taking.

I thought to create another thread this year. Things change, and I'd like to sort of let go of a bunch of the things that were part of that thread, and start with a blank slate this year.

So if you're interested, feel free to join.

For me, the big 2017 goal will be a trip I'm planning to take to Japan at the end of the year. It will be for a conference, where I'm planning to give a talk. The talk will most likely be in Japanese.

I gave a talk in December 2014 at the same conference, and it was a lot of work but also very rewarding. (That talk was in Japanese). I'm hoping that the talk this year goes well, winds up being less stressful, and that I can "do more" in Japan this trip than in my 2014 trip. But "do more" I mostly mean have more interesting conversations with more people, understand more menus and the like. For reference, I did JET in the early 2000s.

One thing that worked well for me last year was posting monthly stats of mature anki cards. So I'll start that here now:

grammar: a backlog of 174 reviews, with 640 mature
kanji: 727 mature
vocab: 5,416 mature

Overall I'm hoping to focus less on anki this year. I have this informal goal of trying to have less than 100 vocab reviews a day. Recently I've been adding 2 new vocab cards a day.

I'm hoping that reducing time in anki frees up time to do other things with the language. For example, I recently started working with a teacher more on speaking and writing. I actually just sent him a draft of an email I wrote to a friend who I'm hoping to visit in my trip to Japan. He made lots of corrections, and I just emailed my friend the revised version.

There are lots of super-motivated people here, and I'm much more chill about Japanese. I'm hoping that the people who wind up joining this thread can be positive, and that we can all help and support each other!
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#2
Hey! Thanks for making the thread Smile I'll be joining this year as well because I found last years thread to be very motivational.

About goals, I'm still a bit unsure. I think I want to get into reading easy stuff. Maybe stories aimed at elementary school kids? I'm not sure yet. To be honest, right now whenever I see a wall of Japanese text I get really intimidated and find myself thinking "There's no way I could understand this" and thus not even trying. Granted I still have a looong way to go, but there has been some stuff that I forced myself to try that turned out to be not that bad after all. I'm not yet entirely sure about the material I'll use but I'll keep you updated Smile

On the "proper learning" side of things, I'm planning to go through the JALUP stuff for review. It's not the cheapest of options out there, but I've been eyeing with it for a while now and when they started the alpha for the new shop/review site I jumped on the bandwagon. I've been working through the free stuff for now, but once my new credit card arrives I'll probably buy some of the decks. Apart from that I've been sporadically reviewing on iknow as well and will probably continue to do so. It would be cool if I could be a bit more consistent over there in 2017!

I'm not yet sure if I'll try the JLPT this year. The July test is being held in the city I live in so it would be pretty easy to attend... but I've got some other stuff going on in June/July so I'm not sure if I want to make this even more stressful. *hummm* I'll probably decide shortly before the sign up deadline as always Tongue
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#3
Good luck in your endeavors this year, guys!

From now on, my life is about to change big time. I've finally accepted the fact that I don't really want to be a teacher anymore. Quite frankly, dealing with people who don't want to learn English, let alone be in the classroom, is just not my thing. There's a lot more to it, but I'll just leave it at that.

After a lot of thinking, I've decided to switch gears and go for something much bigger that had crossed my mind a few times before, but I never seriously considered it - studying to become a diplomat. This is a long journey and it'll take more than a year to study everything. So I guess I won't be living and breathing Japanese again once my computer is fixed, which means my mad plan of madness of attaining N1 proficiency in my first 1.5 or 2 years of study will probably have to wait a little longer. That being said, I'll still read the news, watch anime, add a couple of new words to Anki, etc, so I should be able to improve... just not nearly as quickly.

On the other hand, I'm embarking on another crazy journey - attaining at the very least b2 profiency in Spanish and French in a single year. Next year, I'll need to study these 2 subjects for the exam, so I think b2 is really the minimum I should be aiming for here. In all honesty, I believe c1 is the ideal goal, but unfortunately not the most realistic. There's a lot more to study than foreign languages, so I can't make a full time commitment to them.

My plan is to put in 3 hours a day (maybe 3 and a half, that's actually the ideal goal) on Spanish until the second semester, then stick to reading the news daily (or something equivalent) in Spanish and doing my Anki reviews as I switch to French. If I find myself with a lot of spare time, maybeeee I'll try 4h or 4 and a half hours a day and go for c1 instead... but I'll have so much stuff to study besides foreign languages that I doubt that'll happen. On the flip side, Spanish is soooo similar to Portuguese (as in unbelievably similar) that I'm far from starting from 0, so I hope that'll give me enough of an edge to go beyond b2 in spite of my current time constraints.

Alright, enough with this wall of text - time to study!

PS: I know this isn't about Spanish or French, but if you guys happen to have any pointers or resources you highly recommend, please let me know)
Edited: 2017-01-03, 8:16 am
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JapanesePod101
#4
(2017-01-03, 8:09 am)FlameseeK Wrote: I've decided to switch gears and go for something much bigger that had crossed my mind a few times before, but I never seriously considered it - studying to become a diplomat.

What nationality are you? That would make a big difference regarding the kind of advice you would get about how to make this happen. 

Regardless of your nationality, there are certain things to keep in mind about diplomatic work. For example, while it allows you to live around the world, it also encloses you within a bubble dominated by your own nationality, although that's a bigger problem for Americans than for people from smaller countries. Other not-so-pleasant realities:

You have to work your hardest to implement policies you might totally disagree with.

You spend your career perfecting your skills as a diplomat but then all the top jobs end up in the hands of political appointees who don't know crap but you have to follow their orders anyway.

You have to spend years just working on boring visa applications stuff (depending on the country).

It's a government job, so it's rife with inefficiency, annoying rules, dumb outdated procedures, etc. 

It's no road to riches. 

You have to take hardship posts.

Very hard for your spouse to simultaneously make a career.

On the other hand, it could be a great job for you. Just some things to consider.
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#5
Do you happen to be a diplomat? You seem to know quite a bit! By the way, I'm Brazilian.

In my case, the biggest hurdle is that I need to pass a ridiculously competitive public exam that takes place annually. It's about 22 vacancies for 5k-6k people (and a couple more for black and disabled people, which isn't my case). People usually say it's a long term project and that it takes about 3-6 years to pass. On top of Spanish and French, I'm going to have to study a whole lot of history, geography, economy, law, international politics, Portuguese, and English.

I think Anki is going to be pretty helpful on this journey because there's a lot of stuff I'll have to know by heart for this exam.
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#6
(2017-01-03, 9:54 pm)FlameseeK Wrote: Do you happen to be a diplomat? You seem to know quite a bit! By the way, I'm Brazilian.

In my case, the biggest hurdle is that I need to pass a ridiculously competitive public exam that takes place annually. It's about 22 vacancies for 5k-6k people (and a couple more for black and disabled people, which isn't my case). People usually say it's a long term project and that it takes about 3-6 years to pass. On top of Spanish and French, I'm going to have to study a whole lot of history, geography, economy, law, international politics, Portuguese, and English.

I think Anki is going to be pretty helpful on this journey because there's a lot of stuff I'll have to know by heart for this exam.

Not a diplomat myself. I personally decided I couldn't stand to live inside a foreigner bubble, although I was also pretty sure I wouldn't pass the exams even if I tried. I would have been one of those people still taking the exam five years later.

I later discovered other things about myself that would have made government work distasteful to me. 


Your country's exams sound typically competitive. What happens if you don't make it? Where would that leave you? Certainly studying all those subjects is not a bad use of your time, especially learning the languages. But what's the fallback?

Also, do they just pick people based on that exam? Don't they have some kind of interview process as well? 

Since you're Brazilian, I assume you probably hate either Dilma or Temer or both. Imagine the most distasteful president you can, and then think about going to work every day in order to pursue policies they decided back in Brasilia with no input from you. Also imagine dealing with all sorts of little crises encountered by some misguided or irresponsible countrymen who can't seem to stay out of trouble.

This portrayal is overly negative, but I figure you are already aware of the many positives of the job.
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#7
Yay I love this thread! My Japanese study got seriously derailed by stress and holidays (plus I've currently misplaced my iPad mini that I use to study - where did it goooo), but I've been trying to do at least a little bit every day and I'm hoping in a couple weeks to go back to adding stuff again. My goal this year is making it through all the N3 grammar, which I think is feasible.

Oh, and to read stuff, and mine vocab.

I really do appreciate this thread. It's one of the main things that keeps me moving forward!
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#8
(2017-01-03, 10:14 pm)ChestnutMouse Wrote: Your country's exams sound typically competitive. What happens if you don't make it? Where would that leave you? Certainly studying all those subjects is not a bad use of your time, especially learning the languages. But what's the fallback?

Also, do they just pick people based on that exam? Don't they have some kind of interview process as well? 

Since you're Brazilian, I assume you probably hate either Dilma or Temer or both. Imagine the most distasteful president you can, and then think about going to work every day in order to pursue policies they decided back in Brasilia with no input from you. Also imagine dealing with all sorts of little crises encountered by some misguided or irresponsible countrymen who can't seem to stay out of trouble.

This portrayal is overly negative, but I figure you are already aware of the many positives of the job.
There are no interviews, but you need to write 2 long compositions (2 or 3 pages, it depends on the subject) per subject, save a few exceptions. In other words, you need to write extremely well and have solid knowledge of the subject. You also have to study for another 2 years after you pass, though you get paid for it.

If I don't make it... well, I'm afraid failure isn't really an option at this point anymore. I'm 29 years old and preparing for this exam is going to cost a ton of money and years of preparation, so I have to make this happen no mater what imo. Being a teacher for the rest of my life is just out of the question at this point. But if I don't get somewhat close to passing even after studying like a mad man for a couple of years, I'll probably just study for an easier exam to work as a public servant.

Anyway, my goal is to do my very best and put in as much time as possible just like I did when I started studying Japanese towards the end of 2015. I could be wrong, but I think it'll most likely be a competition against myself (someone who said something along these lines, though the exam was easier at the time) in that I'll need to know as much as possible about all topics and perfect my writing for the second phase of the exam. (the phase first is just straight up questions - get it right and you win a point, get it wrong and you lose one, don't answer and your score remains the same)

So yeah, I've already taken the plunge at this point. All that's left is to study until my eyes bleed and my brain explodes until I pass!
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#9
(2017-01-02, 11:56 am)sumsum Wrote: ...
About goals, I'm still a bit unsure. I think I want to get into reading easy stuff. Maybe stories aimed at elementary school kids? I'm not sure yet. To be honest, right now whenever I see a wall of Japanese text I get really intimidated and find myself thinking "There's no way I could understand this" and thus not even trying. Granted I still have a looong way to go, but there has been some stuff that I forced myself to try that turned out to be not that bad after all. I'm not yet entirely sure about the material I'll use but I'll keep you updated Smile
...

Sounds like a good goal!

In my experience reading is just something that gets easier and easier. And it opens more and more doors.

Here's a true story that illustrates the point: a few weeks ago I went out to dinner with a friend who passed N1 in 2015. He said that he used to have a goal of reading 10 pages a day. Now he can read 40 pages with the same amount of effort. And this change happened *since* passing N1!

LMK if you want any recommendations for reading material. I've been doing a lot of it lately.
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#10
(2017-01-04, 1:51 am)ariariari Wrote: In my experience reading is just something that gets easier and easier. And it opens more and more doors.
Yep (though you can still easily find stuff that's difficult for those days when you want a challenge :-))

One thing I'm really glad I did pretty much from the start was keep a record of all the books I read in Japanese (I use booklog.jp). Now I can look back and say "I read more books this year than last year" and track motivating milestones like "100 books read total". I definitely recommend that for anybody just starting out on reading.
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#11
@pm215 I like the idea of keeping track of books there. I should look into that.

I was actually just here to post that I just finished "Orange" Letter #7 Smile
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#12
(2017-01-04, 7:01 am)pm215 Wrote:
(2017-01-04, 1:51 am)ariariari Wrote: In my experience reading is just something that gets easier and easier. And it opens more and more doors.
Yep (though you can still easily find stuff that's difficult for those days when you want a challenge :-))

One thing I'm really glad I did pretty much from the start was keep a record of all the books I read in Japanese (I use booklog.jp). Now I can look back and say "I read more books this year than last year" and track motivating milestones like "100 books read total". I definitely recommend that for anybody just starting out on reading.

I should of course check it out myself, but could I ask you how booklog.jp compares to goodreads? Does it have some of the same features? I also like keeping track of how much I read each year.
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#13
I don't use goodreads so I don't know what features it has :-)

Pretty much all I use in booklog.jp is that you can type in an ISBN and click 'add to bookshelf', which I do when I finish a book, plus looking at the "show all the covers" view of the bookshelf. It also has an "export as CSV" feature which is nice for having a backup just in case they ever shut down. There's a lot of stuff for tagging, reviewing or blogging about what you read but I never use that so couldn't say how it stacks up against others.

I spot-checked a handful of books from my list to see whether goodreads had them -- of the six or so I tried they had about 4. That suggests to me that you're more likely to run into the irritating experience of "this book I just read and want to record isn't in the system". I've never run into a book that booklog doesn't know about, though I have two out of 116 that it knew about but didn't have the cover image for.
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#14
I will hopefully be taking the JLPT N3 this year in July or December (waiting on my N4 results).

Currently reviewing N4 Grammar and N4 Vocabulary. Started working on my N3 Kanji.

Shin Kanzen Master Kanji N3 7/25

@FlameseeK I find the Assimil French Course to be good Smile
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#15
(2017-01-04, 3:02 pm)benbassist Wrote: @FlameseeK  I find the Assimil French Course to be good Smile
Thanks for letting me know! I think I've seen this name somewhere, but I still need to look it up and see if it's worth it.

Now, my main question is, how do you think it compares to Duolingo? Because my plan right now is to spend 6 months on Spanish and then switch to French. So when I start studying French, I'll be able to to study it in Spanish, which will help me improve my Spanish even further at the same time.

I've just got started on Duolingo, but I get the feeling that if you have a couple of solid websites to go along with it, you don't need much else. Good grammar explanations, a couple of good listening/reading resources per level, good news websites, a good dictionary, good anki decks, etc. Maybe a couple of interesting things to watch or real books, but that's when things get a little complicated since there's nothing inherently interesting to me that I know of. Japanese offers me countless ways to learn while having fun - visual novels, manga, light novels, anime, games... but I'm learning Spanish out of necessity, so I don't know what my options are. Once again, any suggestions are more than welcome!
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#16
(2017-01-05, 10:15 am)FlameseeK Wrote:
(2017-01-04, 3:02 pm)benbassist Wrote: @FlameseeK  I find the Assimil French Course to be good Smile
Thanks for letting me know! I think I've seen this name somewhere, but I still need to look it up and see if it's worth it.

Now, my main question is, how do you think it compares to Duolingo? Because my plan right now is to spend 6 months on Spanish and then switch to French. So when I start studying French, I'll be able to to study it in Spanish, which will help me improve my Spanish even further at the same time.

I've just got started on Duolingo, but I get the feeling that if you have a couple of solid websites to go along with it, you don't need much else. Good grammar explanations, a couple of good listening/reading resources per level, good news websites, a good dictionary, good anki decks, etc. Maybe a couple of interesting things to watch or real books, but that's when things get a little complicated since there's nothing inherently interesting to me that I know of. Japanese offers me countless ways to learn while having fun - visual novels, manga, light novels, anime, games... but I'm learning Spanish out of necessity, so I don't know what my options are. Once again, any suggestions are more than welcome!

@FlameseeK have you considered creating a new thread for this project? You're welcome to continue posting about it here, but I suspect if you laid out your goal in a new thread, you would attract more feedback (both on foreign service, and gaining fluency in these languages).
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#17
(2017-01-04, 1:30 pm)pm215 Wrote: I don't use goodreads so I don't know what features it has :-)

Pretty much all I use in booklog.jp is that you can type in an ISBN and click 'add to bookshelf', which I do when I finish a book, plus looking at the "show all the covers" view of the bookshelf. It also has an "export as CSV" feature which is nice for having a backup just in case they ever shut down. There's a lot of stuff for tagging, reviewing or blogging about what you read but I never use that so couldn't say how it stacks up against others.

I spot-checked a handful of books from my list to see whether goodreads had them -- of the six or so I tried they had about 4. That suggests to me that you're more likely to run into the irritating experience of "this book I just read and want to record isn't in the system". I've never run into a book that booklog doesn't know about, though I have two out of 116 that it knew about but didn't have the cover image for.

Thanks for the tip. It seems like it's best to use booklog to track my Japanese reading.

(2017-01-03, 11:35 pm)FlameseeK Wrote:
(2017-01-03, 10:14 pm)ChestnutMouse Wrote: Your country's exams sound typically competitive. What happens if you don't make it? Where would that leave you? Certainly studying all those subjects is not a bad use of your time, especially learning the languages. But what's the fallback?

Also, do they just pick people based on that exam? Don't they have some kind of interview process as well? 

Since you're Brazilian, I assume you probably hate either Dilma or Temer or both. Imagine the most distasteful president you can, and then think about going to work every day in order to pursue policies they decided back in Brasilia with no input from you. Also imagine dealing with all sorts of little crises encountered by some misguided or irresponsible countrymen who can't seem to stay out of trouble.

This portrayal is overly negative, but I figure you are already aware of the many positives of the job.
There are no interviews, but you need to write 2 long compositions (2 or 3 pages, it depends on the subject) per subject, save a few exceptions. In other words, you need to write extremely well and have solid knowledge of the subject. You also have to study for another 2 years after you pass, though you get paid for it.

If I don't make it... well, I'm afraid failure isn't really an option at this point anymore. I'm 29 years old and preparing for this exam is going to cost a ton of money and years of preparation, so I have to make this happen no mater what imo. Being a teacher for the rest of my life is just out of the question at this point. But if I don't get somewhat close to passing even after studying like a mad man for a couple of years, I'll probably just study for an easier exam to work as a public servant.

Anyway, my goal is to do my very best and put in as much time as possible just like I did when I started studying Japanese towards the end of 2015. I could be wrong, but I think it'll most likely be a competition against myself (someone who said something along these lines, though the exam was easier at the time) in that I'll need to know as much as possible about all topics and perfect my writing for the second phase of the exam. (the phase first is just straight up questions - get it right and you win a point, get it wrong and you lose one, don't answer and your score remains the same)

So yeah, I've already taken the plunge at this point. All that's left is to study until my eyes bleed and my brain explodes until I pass!
Good luck! It seems like you have the fire the in belly to succeed at what you set your mind to.
Edited: 2017-01-05, 2:27 pm
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#18
(2017-01-04, 1:30 pm)pm215 Wrote: I don't use goodreads so I don't know what features it has :-)

Pretty much all I use in booklog.jp is that you can type in an ISBN and click 'add to bookshelf', which I do when I finish a book, plus looking at the "show all the covers" view of the bookshelf. It also has an "export as CSV" feature which is nice for having a backup just in case they ever shut down. There's a lot of stuff for tagging, reviewing or blogging about what you read but I never use that so couldn't say how it stacks up against others.

I think you're referring to bookmeter.com? (It changed names a while back.) If so, another feature is there's a lot of us on there. Smile So you can get some good recs on other things you might want to read. 

This is me: http://bookmeter.com/u/388077.

Another nice feature is you can write reviews on what you've read, which helps hone your JP writing skills. I haven't written any reviews in a while, but am working on one right now for 精霊の守り人; should be posting it tonight after I review w/ my tutor.
Edited: 2017-01-05, 2:40 pm
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#19
(2017-01-05, 2:39 pm)gaiaslastlaugh Wrote:
(2017-01-04, 1:30 pm)pm215 Wrote: I don't use goodreads so I don't know what features it has :-)

Pretty much all I use in booklog.jp is that you can type in an ISBN and click 'add to bookshelf', which I do when I finish a book, plus looking at the "show all the covers" view of the bookshelf. It also has an "export as CSV" feature which is nice for having a backup just in case they ever shut down. There's a lot of stuff for tagging, reviewing or blogging about what you read but I never use that so couldn't say how it stacks up against others.

I think you're referring to bookmeter.com? (It changed names a while back.) If so, another feature is there's a lot of us on there. Smile So you can get some good recs on other things you might want to read. 

This is me: http://bookmeter.com/u/388077.

Another nice feature is you can write reviews on what you've read, which helps hone your JP writing skills. I haven't written any reviews in a while, but am working on one right now for 精霊の守り人; should be posting it tonight after I review w/ my tutor.
Booklog is a different site apparently: http://booklog.jp/
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#20
Yeah, I didn't mean bookmeter, though they look pretty similar in features. (This is me on booklog: http://booklog.jp/users/pm215 -- more memorable urls if nothing else :-)).

But really I didn't want to recommend a specific site so much as the idea of recording everything you read -- you could use a notebook and pen if you wanted to be old-school about it...
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#21
Ahhh my bad - in one of my browsers it's giving me a 403 Forbidden error, so I thought it was a defunct version of Bookmeter. This one looks interesting too.
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#22
(2017-01-05, 1:39 pm)ariariari Wrote: @FlameseeK have you considered creating a new thread for this project? You're welcome to continue posting about it here, but I suspect if you laid out your goal in a new thread, you would attract more feedback (both on foreign service, and gaining fluency in these languages).
Well yeah, I know I'd get more pointers. The truth is, I posted this before I fixed my computer on my psvita, where you simply can't copy and paste stuff. At first, I wasn't really sure whether to post it here or in the new year resolution thread. As I posted a lot in last year's "N3" thread, I thought I'd let everyone know what's up with the lack of updates and why I won't be making nearly as much progress this year.

(2017-01-05, 2:24 pm)ChestnutMouse Wrote: Good luck! It seems like you have the fire the in belly to succeed at what you set your mind to.
¡Muchas gracias! 頑張るぞ!
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#23
My main studying at the moment is working through the Japanesepod dialogs and learning the vocab from them. Currently a little way into Lower Intermediate. I'm trying to have less than 60 due cards per day. I'd like to get into the habit of doing reviews early in the day, and finishing them without getting distracted. If I can make the existing review load go more easily, I might push it up to 100 due cards per day. I like adding new words, so I'm needing to ration them according to how much is due soon.

I've been playing a lot of the old Pokemon games lately. Played generations 1-3 in English and then Japanese; currently playing Soul Silver in Japanese only (but the plot is similar to generation 2); and planning to play Platinum next in Japanese only (having learned the generation 4 rules from Soul Silver), so will see how that goes. Generations 1-4 are all-kana, but I wanted to play them in order. I'm definitely getting faster at reading this sort of thing.

During the period 6-9 months ago, I went on a vocab-learning spree (about 700 cards) from the Jehovah’s Witnesses "わたしの聖書物語の本". After learning this vocab, the text was still a bit too hard, and I left it for a while. I just went back to it recently, with the vocab cards mature and a better grasp of the language overall, and can read most of it quite easily (a little faster than the audiobook on average). So I'm reading through it again now. This is the first time I've been able to read good-sized paragraphs of text and actually feel like I'm reading, rather than just decoding it Smile

After re-reading that book, I'd like to work on reading things where I don't already know what they're going to say. I might sign up to Satori Reader for a while. With each article, I should first try to read it without looking anything up, and then go back through it using the excellent annotations.

My listening is better than my reading. I've been watching anime on Crunchyroll with each episode twice, no subs followed by English subs. Watched Flying Witch after hearing about it on this forum, and it was great for watching unsubbed. Tried watching Orange, but got too frustrated about not being able to read the letters, so just watched it subbed. Tsuritama was a fun easy anime, and I'd suggest that people who liked Flying Witch check it out. I also watched Natsume Yuujin-cho this way, which is a bit harder and I missed most of the explanations the first time through, but it was still enjoyable to watch (the bits I missed didn't bother me like they did in Orange).

This year I'm planning to spend a bit less time on Japanese overall and more time on software development, but still hoping to be able to read for real pretty soon!
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#24
@FlameseeK have you checked your local university? At my uni the French/Spanish/Italian courses all seem to be rather well made. I attended a French intensive course during summer break a few years back that was pretty good with like 56 lessons over 2 weeks and that went over a whole A1 textbook. I think the regular courses during semester would be way too slow for your purposes but I imagine such an intensive course could work for you as well at least for one of your languages. Just as an idea Smile (When I attended there were vacancies in the followup course that should bring you up to A2 as well, so I could have aimed for that after a month but... I'm a lazy learner and preferred the more casual route Tongue) There usually seem to be some spots for non-students as well, so there's that. Apart from that I remember quite a few people diving into native material pretty early on (reading Harry Potter and such) I feel like that's just so much easier with European languages :S
Edited: 2017-01-05, 7:52 pm
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#25
Phew... I'm so bad with animal names! But I read a story about a モグラ yesterday on etoeto, and today was a story about someone studying animals in my 伝記 book, which means... tons of animal names! So this is what I learned today:
モグラ
ネズミ
タカ
ひよこ
ひな鳥(ひなどり)
スズメ
オオカミ (I think I knew that one before but forgot it...)

Usually I can get through the books with some missing words, especially the more difficult words, because most of the time they are somewhat explained anyway. But apparently every child knows animal names and I was never really interested in learning them, sooo I guess it's about time :S
Edited: 2017-01-06, 4:57 pm
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