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Net slang/abbreviations

#1
So ANNnews had this video out today about あ゛, え゛, and ま゛, which got me thinking about other net slang. I already know things like (笑) and ww(wwwwwwwwwww...), the former of which is also mentioned (along with おk and うp, which I'm assuming came about due to typing mistakes, like pwn), but I didn't know most of the things in that video. I was pretty slow with net slang in English too.

Here's the video:



Anyway, thought this was interesting and wanted to share it. Know any other Japanese Internet slang?
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#2
I saw this video on Facebook earlier today. The only Japanese net slang I knew was wwwww so the rest was new to me. Btw how do you pronounce あ゛, え゛, and ま゛ ? Is it that strange airy way the older woman said?

[EDIT]
イエローキャブ is the only slang I know but that isn't really internet slang.
Edited: 2016-09-21, 10:34 pm
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#3
Kind of like how the girl at about 0:22 said it (they prefaced that clip with 実は), but that's only with あ゛, so... I guess for the others, it's how you'd say it if you were surprised (in a negative way?).

Better get some false teeth, so I can have an excuse!
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#4
(2016-09-21, 9:46 pm)sholum Wrote: Know any other Japanese Internet slang?

This stuff changes pretty fast and tends to be different based on age and social groups. I don't know much of the actual internet slang but a lot of it is based on abbreviations of common things like: こん〜、あり〜、おや〜 (Don't spoil the answers for others, once you figure one out the rest are obvious.)

I do get blasted with random slang from my friends so I can tell you that わら is so popular that people actually say it while speaking now. As for the rest you might occasionally run into it on LINE or Twitter but being exposed to something enough to use it yourself is best done the old fashion way.

In any case there tons of まとめ articles about this stuff and they give explanations and examples. It's more useful used as a reference or just as a language exchange conversation piece. If you ask Japanese people about specific ones you'll get a lot of, "I would never say that! Oh, but I know this girl that would!" kind of responses. I know a lot of my more majime friends think its a bit low class.
最近の女子高生がよくSNSで使う流行りの若者言葉ランキング47選【2016年版】

If you want to go even beyond native you could listen to 日本昔話をギャル語に videos. There are a few others but this one has full subtitles and the comments are very telling especially all of the people complaining that it isn't even Japanese.



The reality is that unless you are suddenly transformed into a high school girl you won't even see or hear most of this stuff. As far as the mainstream slang goes that can be picked up just by watching the big variety shows every week.
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#5
@tokyostyle
Thanks for all of that!

Personally, I don't use that kind of slang (I generally type the same way everywhere, unless it's something formal), but I run into it online in English, so I figured I'd run into it in Japanese.

So outside of the common stuff, the net slang is mostly from teenage girls? Nothing that mostly lives in gaming spheres that isn't immediately obvious (not game specific terms, of course)?
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#6
(2016-09-21, 10:59 pm)sholum Wrote: Nothing that mostly lives in gaming spheres that isn't immediately obvious (not game specific terms, of course)?

I have very limited knowledge of game slang and the only thing I have ever run into is either abbreviations of terms, which isn't really slang except for the fact that non-gamers might not understand it at first glance, or imports of game terms from English. For example even on voice chat I hear stuff like "gg", "op" and other English abbreviations. I don't play anything made in Japan or Japan only so I guess PC gamers who play western stuff are also familiar with western game slang.

I do know a few Japanese specific slang names for Overwatch characters but most of that I learned from watching a streamer. In fact if you want to learn game slang then you should definitely watch Japanese twitch streams!
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#7
Two that come to mind are:

ワロタ I see a lot on /r/newsokur which is kind of like LOL. I think I saw a thing somewhere that (笑) is kind of passe now, but that's probably age dependent.

億ション(おくしょん) is for a fancy apartment, i.e. a play on words for マンション
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#8
There is also a kind of slang where you remove all the vowels from a word, like this: wktk = ワクテカ or kwsk = 詳しく.

And then there is DQN = ドキュン.

It's also fairly common to write certain offensive words in different kanji as a sort of censor. 基地外 = 気違い, 氏ね = 死ね.

And this is more of a 2ch thing I think, but it's fairly common to refer to one self as ワイ, and add っ wherever possible. マッマ=ママ、ねっこ=ねこ or add ンゴ after certain phrases to portray yourself as a victim. Example: たった今会社クビになったンゴwwwww
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#9
(2016-09-22, 8:24 pm)harahachibu Wrote: ワロタ I see a lot on /r/newsokur which is kind of like LOL.

This one is really good. I see it more in hiragana, but from about 25 and below it seems more common to say わろた rather than うける.

(笑)is definitely old school but I still see a lot of bare 笑 and of course doubling or tripling it. 笑笑 Also just plain wwwww is still popular if you feel like going overboard with laughter. Big Grin
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#10
A few more:

漏れ(もれ)instead of 俺(おれ).  I saw this first during the "net slang" parts of Densha Otoko.  I can't say I see it a lot in the wild, so maybe it's died down, or maybe it's just active on sites that I don't visit.

ステマ an abbreviation for "stealth marketing."

デマ not sure where it comes from, but it means false rumor or false information.  Actually, jisho.org says it comes from デマゴギー(demagogy)

ディスる  comes from the word "diss," turned into a Japanese verb.

ようつべ refers to Youtube

なう means "now" or "currently"

スレ means "thread"

メシウマ While searching around for some ネット用語 pages I came across this, which means "schadenfreude; pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others"
Edited: 2016-09-23, 6:36 pm
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#11
(2016-09-23, 6:20 pm)harahachibu Wrote: A few more:

漏れ(もれ)instead of 俺(おれ).  I saw this first during the "net slang" parts of Densha Otoko.  I can't say I see it a lot in the wild, so maybe it's died down, or maybe it's just active on sites that I don't visit.

ステマ an abbreviation for "stealth marketing."

デマ not sure where it comes from, but it means false rumor or false information.  Actually, jisho.org says it comes from デマゴギー(demagogy)

ディスる  comes from the word "diss," turned into a Japanese verb.

ようつべ refers to Youtube

なう means "now" or "currently"

スレ means "thread"

メシウマ While searching around for some ネット用語 pages I came across this, which means "schadenfreude; pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others"

Amazingly, all of those show up in Rikaisama, even ようつべ.

These are all really interesting, everyone! Thanks!
Edited: 2016-09-23, 7:34 pm
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#12
Today's 天声人語 (free registration required for full access) is all about slang words and expressions, including those originating in net/gaming cultures (the aforementioned ディスる is among those brought up). It also mentions recently published research on vocabulary understood by the younger generations but not older ones, and vice versa. A few more expressions from the column:


ペラい - flimsy (from 薄っぺらい)

フラグが立つ - to be able to foresee how things will turn out/to trigger a certain outcome (from video games with branching storylines)

りょ - roger, understood (from 了解)

じわる - to gradually dawn on one some time after one had initially failed to understand smth (e.g. the humour of a joke or the meaning of a saying)

きょどる - to act suspiciously, to behave in a strange way (from 挙動不審); according to Rikaisama it has another meaning of "How are you today?" (from 今日どうする?)

飯テロ - posting pictures of appetizing food around the time when many people are hungry/sending pictures of food to someone you know is hungry
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#13
(2016-09-23, 6:20 pm)harahachibu Wrote: デマ not sure where it comes from, but it means false rumor or false information.  Actually, jisho.org says it comes from デマゴギー(demagogy)

This one I actually knew! I learned it reading light novels, and now I hear it in anime too.
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#14
Just encountered an amusing slang term:

火病る - to get one's knickers in a twist

Big Grin
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