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Studying for a Master's (or Bacherlor's) at a university in Japan?

#1
Hi everyone! Smile

I've been living in Japan for about +4 years now. I'm currently employed as a software developer in a small company in Tokyo. 35 years old. I've always dreamed of doing a Masters degree, so now before I am too old, I'd like to see the possibility of fulfilling that dream in Japan. Other useful information: I hold a spousal visa.

Do you know any cases / are you a case yourself?

What about scholarships, is it even possible to "apply" for one?

Do you know what are some of Japanese less prestigious colleges? Perhaps I would be luckier in one of those.
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#2
Do you plan on working while in grad school? Many unis have a special entrance examination for mature students who are already employed.

If you just want the grad school experience, then there are plenty of small universities in Tokyo and its surroundings. You need to be fluent in Japanese to get in (and in handwritten Japanese to boot). Some unis accept English, but usually those are either very expensive or hard to get in to. What do you want to do a Masters in?

At your age and given the break in education, I don't think you stand a chance for a scholarship, sorry. There are some private ones that you can apply after you've been accepted, but they are quite competitive.
Edited: 2016-07-01, 10:59 am
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#3
> Do you plan on working while in grad school?

Yes, if possible. Otherwise, I'd figure out what to do (quit probably).

> If you just want the grad school experience...

No, I just want to get a degree. I was looking for remote programs too, those would be even better. Is it even possible to pull out a DIY degree in Japan?

I am quite fluent in the spoken language and I can read as well. I can write too, but very poorly.

> What do you want to do a Masters in?

Computer science or close.
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JapanesePod101
#4
Ok. Here's a starting point. Look for programs that welcome 社会人, since that's your best bet in keeping your job (and your company might be surprisingly open towards a more lax schedule, tho it depends on your company)
Here's a good list to start with
http://www.rena.gr.jp/surveys/exam_shakaijin/md.html

Seriously Don't think Japan is too open to non-traditional degrees, but tbh i don't know much about those.
Keep in mind that usually people with 社会人 status tend to finish a bit later, so it might take you 3-5 years to do it. It's not a bad thing, and you can definitely do it faster depending on your motovation and energy levels, but given how crazy tuition is in Japan it's best to plan for the worse.
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#5
(2016-07-01, 10:09 am)Mwchop Wrote: I've been living in Japan for about +4 years now. I'm currently employed as a software developer in a small company in Tokyo. 35 years old. I've always dreamed of doing a Masters degree, so now before I am too old, I'd like to see the possibility of fulfilling that dream in Japan. Other useful information: I hold a spousal visa.

If you are talking MBAs: Check out Hitotsubashi. If that doesn't suit you then McGill has a weekend only course, but the schedule is pretty brutal.

If you want a master's in computer science then you are limited to Tokyo University and Tsukuba University.

If you want anything else you can add Waseda and Sophia to list. (Possibly a few others but Googling will find plenty of results.)

Most of the schools will expect that you can attend weekday classes so hopefully you have some flexibility from your employer. (Most masters programs are more about writing your thesis than taking class so you might get some flexibility from your professor as well.)

I did my bachelor's here, while working part-time, so this list is mostly from first and second hand knowledge.

EDIT: Everything above assumes you are wanting an English taught program. If you have graduate level Japanese there are tons of resources available to you.
Edited: 2016-07-03, 10:57 am
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#6
@tokyostyle Thanks for the summary and links, all very useful.

Did you pay for your bachelor's (~4 million yen?) or did you have a scholarship?
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#7
(2016-07-03, 11:10 am)Mwchop Wrote: Did you pay for your bachelor's (~4 million yen?) or did you have a scholarship?

Paid. Being white, male, American, and over 29 was a death sentence for scholarships. The age was by far the worst problem and I would assume masters scholarships are a lot more lenient there but another big batch of scholarships are for SEA countries.
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