Back

Exploring Job Options in Japan

#1
Hey guys, thinking about my options for Japan as always. That's pretty broad so let me narrow it down. I graduated March 2014, began my current job August 2014, and have been working here for nearly a year and a half. It's a start-up that's moving really fast. The possibility of expanding to Japan can be a reality, and all of my bosses know I want to be there; however, their primary focus is not on APAC.

I very much like my current company, but I'm also getting restless and feel at some point I need to take the risk and pursue my dream. I would like to give it until Fall 2016 to see where we're at. In the meantime I will plan a vacation to Japan and try to incorporate work in the hopes I can enjoy a longer time there while combining it with my break. I may use this time to speak with some Japanese contacts I made at a trade show back in September. They're in the same industry and it could lead to some possible opportunities.

My immediate question is regarding the flow of hiring. I'm aware seniors in college have certain blocks during which they interview and so forth. As a foreigner exploring my options there, am I limited to specific months or seasons? Are there times which, if my company is not getting me where I wanna be, it's best to begin sending out applications? More importantly, what are the best go-to sites to develop my Japanese CV?

Taking the N1 next week and hoping for a pass, it'll increase my options. My other option is to start selling my company on the idea of Japan. This would require research on my part and building value for us to expand there. Not sure how to do this though.
Reply
#2
I'm probably not the best person to ask about actually *landing* a job in Japan, but I took some interviews over the summer and researched quite a bit. I won't be graduating until next fall semester so it's all a bit early, but it's at least nice to know what I'm getting into and prepare myself for next year.

Are you looking to work at a foreign company in Japan or a Japanese company? Japanese companies seem to follow a pretty specific pattern for new graduates and have two times a year where they bring in a lot of new recruits: April and November-ish (I think it was, sometime later in the year). You've already graduated and have work experience so you wouldn't *need* to apply as a new graduate. Plenty of companies have applications for mid-career professionals. You can use the search term "中途採用" or "中途入社" and it should bring up companies that are accepting mid-career professionals. This is highly dependent on the company I think, but when I was researching jobs, I found that there were generally less mid-career positions available, but I think that's probably natural. Worse comes to worst,  you can apply as 新卒 if you can't find anything else (but expect crappy pay).

Take a look at http://www.careerforum.net/ if you haven't already. They do career forum events around the world multiple times a year, and there's also an online component where you can build a resume in English and Japanese and apply to companies online and for the career fairs. Since you may not have a Japanese work visa in hand already, it might be more difficult, but there are also Japanese-specific websites like リクナビ, or you could do the good ol' Google search. Also, brush up on your Kanji writing skills if you plan on doing any in-person interviews because a lot of companies expect handwritten resumes like this.

For what it's worth, when I applied to a fairly competitive tech company through careerforum.net this summer, they got back to me fairly quickly and made me take an online test and then gave me a Skype video interview. This was toward of the end of summer which is when I believe interviews start kicking into full gear. The process took about a month in total from start until rejection. Tongue

The western companies I saw seemed a little more relaxed about scheduling I think. Especially for mid-career professionals, I think you could probably apply at any time, even at normal Japanese companies.
Edited: 2015-11-28, 10:38 pm
Reply
#3
(2015-11-28, 9:41 pm)TheVinster Wrote: My immediate question is regarding the flow of hiring. I'm aware seniors in college have certain blocks during which they interview and so forth. As a foreigner exploring my options there, am I limited to specific months or seasons? Are there times which, if my company is not getting me where I wanna be, it's best to begin sending out applications? More importantly, what are the best go-to sites to develop my Japanese CV?

I'm going to assume your degree is related to your industry; because this will be relevant to work permits.

As far as hiring seasons and what not. Don't worry about it. That said, you might see more job openings around the Fall and Spring as companies try and line up with college graduates, but if you are aiming for more mid level stuff then you don't have to worry about that.

In terms of timing, this can be tricky. You want to be able be in Japan to do interviews, this increases your odds of getting a job. Something you might be able to do is dig around on the job sites (I'll post links below) and put your resume in for specific jobs you like, and also visit the recruiting sites and put your resume in their general system. Maybe give this a few days or a week and then find numbers on their web site and call them (use skype or something). Try getting in touch with someone about the jobs you already sent resumes in for, find out if they think you are good match, and then mention you are planning to be in Japan in the next few weeks. If you aren't a match, still let them know about your time schedule in Japan, find out if there are any other potential jobs you'd be a match for. You should also put your vacation schedule in your cover letter obviously. If its word, maybe even make it bold, make it stand out. I've never done this, but this is how I'm planning to do it in the future.

As far as CV is concerned. I can't offer up too much info on this. My suggestion would be to just convert your English resume to Japanese if you submitting stuff electronically. If a company wants a traditional Japanese CV then the recruiter will probably let you know and might even help you with it, but I suspect your translated resume would be good enough.

Sites:
http://www.daijob.com
http://jp.indeed.com/
https://www.careercross.com/en/
https://japan.careerengine.org/

Those are the good places to go digging for jobs specifically looking for bilinguals; HOWEVER, if you are super gungho about getting to Japan. Obviously try doing searches for 転職 and maybe some key words for the industry/job you are looking for. You will probably get other possible hits. How well your resume will be received will be case by case I imagine since some sites are probably only expecting Japanese people to apply. Same thing applies even with those recruiters on those sites though, find a number and call.

If startups are your cup of tea still though. Try doing google searches for ベンチャー 転職 or 求人 and any other keywords you can think of.

Couple of examples:
http://www.find-job.net/list/focus-2/1-1-1/
http://www.s-venture.jp/

This is kind of a round about method but also check out this podcast:
http://www.disruptingjapan.com/
Check the company names in each podcast and then find their website. See if they list jobs. If no jobs/career page can be found but you like the company, it still might be worth it to try and get in contact with the company somehow; either through a phone call or seeing if you can stalk someone important down on social media (LinkedIn/Twitter/etc) lol.

I think thats probably enough information. Bookmark these sites as well:
http://jobtalk.jp/
http://www.vorkers.com/
They are like the Glassdoor of Japan but crappier. You have to register and submit a review to be able to get access to most of the site I think.

Finally on the N1. If you've passed the N2 already, I wouldn't sweat the N1 so much. It'll open some doors, but I bet if you just put down that you know "Business Japanese" on your resume, no one will question it until they call you. Even then, you might be able to get by so long as you can show you can operate in Japanese conversation/correspondence without too much trouble. This is especially relevant to the non-bilingual websites as most Japanese people don't know what the JLPT even is. So listing you are N1 or N2 is useless, they'll judge you on how well you can actually communicate.

EDIT:
I actually forgot something relevant to the non-bilingual sites that I wanted to elaborate on. When I mentioned "case by case basis" I was mainly referring to the issue of "Wo this guy is a foreigner!" But re-reading my reply I completely forgot about another poignant issue: Visas. You can probably safely assume that most companies on bilingual sites will be able to handle a visa application, but most companies on regular sites might be confused, overwhelmed, or oblivious to the whole deal. A lot of companies often hire visa lawyers to help with the visa process, which is something that companies advertising on regular sites might not be interested in doing. Keep that in mind, but at the same time, don't rule them out.
Edited: 2015-11-29, 4:04 am
Reply
Breakthrough Sale: Get 28% OFF Basic or Premium!   Click here: BREAKTHROUGH2017
JapanesePod101
#4
Quote:Are you looking to work at a foreign company in Japan or a Japanese company?

Either, as long as I'm in Japan. I have no problem against straight Japanese companies, but I do feel an American one in Japan would lend to better working conditions. That's just a hunch and likely not true. At the end of the day my bosses would likely be Japanese. I will not pursue a new graduate role, though.

Quote:I'm going to assume your degree is related to your industry; because this will be relevant to work permits.

My major was Business Admin, which is fairly general. I'm currently at a tech start-up that builds software for the Salesforce CRM. One idea is to then pursue a job at Salesforce Japan. My role is customer-facing, not developing, so my experience is somewhat usable at more than just tech companies.

I feel it's definitely important to use my time in Japan in 1 of 2 ways. I can either try to actively build value for our company while I'm out there. Figure out companies to talk to, likely partners, who would be interested in selling our product. Or I can do as you said, vix, and actively pursue interviews. Both of these would require some decent planning and preparation on my part. That being said I'm not much into visiting historical stuff, I typically visit Japan to meet new people and have fun. So I wouldn't have any problems with either of these during the day when people can't hang out.

Thanks both of you for your feedback. I'll work on getting a Japanese copy of my resume (need to update my current one first). Most of my research into this will begin next week after the JLPT so I can focus on that for now. I know N1 isn't required, but I applied, have failed twice in the past, and want to knock it out of the park. It'll be a big boost in motivation for me.
Reply
#5
What vix wrote should probably just become a guide for job hunting in Japan, but I'll add one more link. If you want to consider staying in the startup scene here in Japan there is a site dedicated to startup job listings: https://justa.io
Reply
#6
(2015-11-29, 6:33 pm)TheVinster Wrote: I feel it's definitely important to use my time in Japan in 1 of 2 ways. I can either try to actively build value for our company while I'm out there. Figure out companies to talk to, likely partners, who would be interested in selling our product.

Option 1 is obviously something that is possible but without knowing your product I couldn't say; even then, I'd probably be too critical and down play the likelihood of success, to be able to provide anything constructive. That said, it'll probably be a gamble either way since you probably won't be able to do both options at the same time. Spreading your company will probably involve a lot of actual facetime and running around.

One thing I can say is that trying to move your current company into Japan might get you to Japan eventually, but at a far slower rate than probably looking for a new job. The flip side is that your work life is far more likely to be positive (assuming you like your current situation) than if you get a new job. This is simply due to the fact that you can probably use your current office culture in Japan vs more traditional Japanese work culture. Plus you can probably move your current salary over with you AND maybe tack on an expat package as well, which will probably trump 90% of anything you can find anywhere else in Japan. If your company isn't actively pursuing going to Japan right now though, you could probably expect to add a year or two onto the "when I expect to be in Japan" expectation. This is simply due to the bureaucratic administrative issues that arise: filing paperwork to register a company in Japan, filing stuff for having employees in country, and other things; FOLLOWED BY filling paper work for visas for your new workers. This is all stuff that starts happening from the time your employer decides they want a presence in Japan, which they still haven't.

Quote:My major was Business Admin, which is fairly general. I'm currently at a tech start-up that builds software for the Salesforce CRM. One idea is to then pursue a job at Salesforce Japan.
Your major is pretty good then and your ideas are good, but you'll definitely want to keep your options open instead of pinning them all on one company if you want to increase the speed at which you get to Japan. Most of what I mentioned in my previous post is at least still relevant to you. You might even be in a good position for most tech startups in Japan as well.

Something I forgot to add in my prior post that I just thought of. Another route for trying to find jobs in Japan, if you go that direction, would be to try and line up your time in Japan so you can hit up "startup meetings." Most major cities in the US and even Tokyo have stuff like this. A certain cafe or bar where people interested in startups will meetup and just talk (or give talks). Its a potential good place to network for a new job. It might even be a good place to network for your company depending on how applicable your product might be to other startups.
Reply
#7
(2015-11-29, 10:23 pm)tokyostyle Wrote: If you want to consider staying in the startup scene here in Japan there is a site dedicated to startup job listings: https://justa.io
I'm reminded again of just how wide a field software engineering is these days -- the average skillset these startups seem to want is miles away from what I do (systems-level coding in C, mostly). Incidentally, I didn't see anything on that site about visa sponsorship -- do you know if the typical startup is (or is not) willing to arrange/sponsor the necessary visa for foreign applicants? (I'd guess at least the ones with English versions of their ads probably are.)
Reply
#8
Hmm... I didnt know small companies / start-ups could sponsor visas. They certainly can't in America (unless they have significant revenue)

If you really like your company and truly believe in their success, then stick it out til they get you to Japan.

I worked at a start-up that promised to send me to Japan within that year. My dream was about to come true but everything about that work environment was wrong. Soon enough I could not stand working there anymore. The atmosphere and attitude of people were ridiculous. Yes my dream of Japan was inches from my fingers, but I had to have my peace of mind come first. If I had gone to Japan with them, I wouldn't have enjoyed it at all.
Now, I have to wait a few more years to find a new job that will achieve my dream - and that waiting time feels like hell - but it a less painful hell than what would have been at my previous company.

So basically that. What do you value more? Just being in Japan ASAP? Or being in a job you actually like?
Reply
#9
(2015-11-30, 6:33 am)pm215 Wrote: I'm reminded again of just how wide a field software engineering is these days -- the average skillset these startups seem to want is miles away from what I do (systems-level coding in C, mostly). Incidentally, I didn't see anything on that site about visa sponsorship -- do you know if the typical startup is (or is not) willing to arrange/sponsor the necessary visa for foreign applicants? (I'd guess at least the ones with English versions of their ads probably are.)

There's really no way to know. Honestly with these sites that tend to be aimed at domestic Japanese, the thing you have to do is just apply and then if you make it to the interview stage, ask them about visa sponsorship. Its not super difficult, but it probably requires a little legal counsel to help draw up the documents.

And ya, startups are usually not in the system level stuff unless their product involves some kind of low level stuff.

angelneko Wrote:Hmm... I didnt know small companies / start-ups could sponsor visas. They certainly can't in America (unless they have significant revenue)
Ya, Japan doesn't have a H1B system like the US does. As far as I know, there isn't any kind of quota for the number of work permits that can be handed out to immigrants. The most limiting factor is usually that people have no idea how to go about applying for a Visa (Certificate of Eligibility). You can probably consult immigration and they'll tell you what you need, but that doesn't really cover the internal checkboxes you would need to check for immigration to grant you the Visa/CoE. Visa lawyers are more versed in that.
Reply
#10
(2015-11-30, 6:02 pm)vix86 Wrote:
(2015-11-30, 6:33 am)pm215 Wrote: I'm reminded again of just how wide a field software engineering is these days -- the average skillset these startups seem to want is miles away from what I do (systems-level coding in C, mostly). Incidentally, I didn't see anything on that site about visa sponsorship -- do you know if the typical startup is (or is not) willing to arrange/sponsor the necessary visa for foreign applicants? (I'd guess at least the ones with English versions of their ads probably are.)

There's really no way to know. Honestly with these sites that tend to be aimed at domestic Japanese, the thing you have to do is just apply and then if you make it to the interview stage, ask them about visa sponsorship. Its not super difficult, but it probably requires a little legal counsel to help draw up the documents.

And ya, startups are usually not in the system level stuff unless their product involves some kind of low level stuff.

angelneko Wrote:Hmm... I didnt know small companies / start-ups could sponsor visas. They certainly can't in America (unless they have significant revenue)
Ya, Japan doesn't have a H1B system like the US does. As far as I know, there isn't any kind of quota for the number of work permits that can be handed out to immigrants. The most limiting factor is usually that people have no idea how to go about applying for a Visa (Certificate of Eligibility). You can probably consult immigration and they'll tell you what you need, but that doesn't really cover the internal checkboxes you would need to check for immigration to grant you the Visa/CoE. Visa lawyers are more versed in that.

The startup I work at in America just sponsored someone. We're a startup but growing fast and received 80 million in funding over the past year. Needless to say we're probably an exception. That being said I became more open to working at startups, but I'm not explicitly tied to the environment.

In contrast to you, angelneko, I'm very happy where I'm at. But I'm also decently young and want to enjoy the possibility of a future working in Japan. The two don't have to be mutually exclusive, I just have to accept a risk. As stated my bosses know very much I'd like to go to Japan. Even if they start sending me for work purposes, I'd be open to that to begin. I can say with complete confidence I'll be taking serious steps to live there in the next several months. It's just a matter of how.
Reply
#11
Long one lurker here. First post.

Quick background for reference - I've been working for a major Japanese tech company for the last 4 years. I started in the HR department working on globalization initiatives and then transitioned into recruiting (non-Japanese MBA's mostly) and then labor. I jumped out of HR two years ago and have been working in new business development since then. I have N1 but my spoken Japanese is absolutely terrible and not anywhere near good enough for customer facing roles.

Couple things I think you should think about. 

First, you are stuck in the what I like to call zone of purgatory between 新卒 and 中途. You missed the main hiring opportunities for new graduates but don't have enough experience for mid-career hires. However, most companies take in a certain amount of 第二新卒 every cycle. These are people who joined other companies but things didn't work out for whatever reason so they enter an incoming class of another company. It's kind of a hard reset for people. This is an option for you and based on your background, my company would absolutely love to interview you and maybe give you a new grad job. The negative side here is that this will be a bid step down in your responsibilities and pay as well. 

The next thing to think about is whether or not your Japanese is good enough for a customer facing role. You mentioned that you failed N1 twice. I don't mean to be harsh here but you are basically illiterate in the eyes of a Japanese employee. N1 is Japanese middle school reading level and if you are not 100% comfortable with reading and responding to...let's say 50...advanced Japanese emails + phone calls every day, I would try to focus on work that is NOT customer facing.
Edited: 2015-12-04, 12:43 am
Reply
#12
(2015-12-04, 12:41 am)Gaikoukan23 Wrote: Long one lurker here. First post.

Quick background for reference - I've been working for a major Japanese tech company for the last 4 years. I started in the HR department working on globalization initiatives and then transitioned into recruiting (non-Japanese MBA's mostly) and then labor. I jumped out of HR two years ago and have been working in new business development since then. I have N1 but my spoken Japanese is absolutely terrible and not anywhere near good enough for customer facing roles.

Couple things I think you should think about. 

First, you are stuck in the what I like to call zone of purgatory between 新卒 and 中途. You missed the main hiring opportunities for new graduates but don't have enough experience for mid-career hires. However, most companies take in a certain amount of 第二新卒 every cycle. These are people who joined other companies but things didn't work out for whatever reason so they enter an incoming class of another company. It's kind of a hard reset for people. This is an option for you and based on your background, my company would absolutely love to interview you and maybe give you a new grad job. The negative side here is that this will be a bid step down in your responsibilities and pay as well. 

The next thing to think about is whether or not your Japanese is good enough for a customer facing role. You mentioned that you failed N1 twice. I don't mean to be harsh here but you are basically illiterate in the eyes of a Japanese employee. N1 is Japanese middle school reading level and if you are not 100% comfortable with reading and responding to...let's say 50...advanced Japanese emails + phone calls every day, I would try to focus on work that is NOT customer facing.

You're welcome to privately tell me more about the company you work for, I'd be curious to hear. Not sure if you're offering though.

I'm hoping to get an opportunity where mediocre Japanese is acceptable, and then attend night or weekend school for Japanese while just immersing myself. After that I want to grow into a role that fits. It doesn't have to be customer facing. The one thing I do know is that I hope to live/work in Osaka, and in comparison to what is in Tokyo there are less opportunities. Nonetheless if I get in Japan I'm happy wherever.
Reply
#13
Sorry to bump my own thread, but I'm curious if anyone here has searched for jobs in Japan via LinkedIn? I'm thinking it may be a good idea. Most traditional Japanese don't use it, and my initial takeaway is that a good chunk of the ads are more open to foreigners. Plus you don't get the 20 pages of "English school teacher" ads.
Reply
#14
There are jobs for Japan on LinkedIn but in my experience its usually one of the big international companies that are advertising on their. So companies like IBM, Microsoft, Google, etc. It doesn't hurt to try.

Another tip to try would be to use http://jp.indeed.com as I mentioned earlier. In the keyword box, search for a skill or technology you are good with or you want to use in your next job and then add in 英語. You'll likely pull up all the jobs where the company wants someone that can use English. Again, doesn't eliminate the possibility about troubles with being a foreigner applying but I'd imagine you'll get people that call/email you back. ("Hey this dude read our all Japanese, kanji heavy job posting, maybe he can speak Japanese!")

If you are doing a lot of your hunting by hand, stop. Setup job a number of email job alerts. This way you'll see all the new postings almost immediately. Some places still send out emails for old jobs though. Glassdoor tends to email me once a month about jobs in Japan and I get excited cause its for Google and then look and see that the posting is 30 days+.
Reply
#15
(2015-12-13, 2:05 am)vix86 Wrote: There are jobs for Japan on LinkedIn but in my experience its usually one of the big international companies that are advertising on their. So companies like IBM, Microsoft, Google, etc. It doesn't hurt to try.

Another tip to try would be to use http://jp.indeed.com as I mentioned earlier. In the keyword box, search for a skill or technology you are good with or you want to use in your next job and then add in 英語. You'll likely pull up all the jobs where the company wants someone that can use English. Again, doesn't eliminate the possibility about troubles with being a foreigner applying but I'd imagine you'll get people that call/email you back. ("Hey this dude read our all Japanese, kanji heavy job posting, maybe he can speak Japanese!")

If you are doing a lot of your hunting by hand, stop. Setup job a number of email job alerts. This way you'll see all the new postings almost immediately. Some places still send out emails for old jobs though. Glassdoor tends to email me once a month about jobs in Japan and I get excited cause its for Google and then look and see that the posting is 30 days+.

Thanks, I do have to set up some of those alerts. I haven't quite decided to give up on my current company just yet, so I'm curious how far in advance I should be applying. By the way if I apply for Japanese jobs online should I still be using Japanese format for my resume? Or can I simply take my resume and translate it. Not sure how strict they are. When I was previously applying for jobs I had the standard 1-page resume and a semi-custom cover page where I changed some of the key info to match the position I was applying for.
Reply
#16
I'd assume if the job posting is in Japanese and the company isn't based outside Japan, then use your Japanese translated resume. You could send both resumes when you apply; but you never know what languages the person in HR can understand. If you are still using a 1 page resume you could probably even make page 1 JP and page 2 EN. Also when I say "translated Japanese" I mean 1-to-1, keeping the original format; I'll leave it up to you whether you want to turn it into a standard 歴書 or not.

My personal feeling on using 歴書 is to not use it unless its requested. Not using it probably makes you stand out more, and I'm not sure I'd want to work somewhere where they want even their resumes to be standardized.
Reply
#17
TheVinster, keep us updated on your progress. I'm thinking of going the same route in about 5-6 years after my youngest goes off to college, but my plan is to stay at my current (American) company and transfer internally to our Tokyo office when the time is right.
Reply
#18
New user here, great content all around! This thread especially has been really helpful in planning out job options. I'm kinda hitting a snag with trying to get over to Japan (finishing a masters in transport planning July 2016), though I've emailed a bunch of foreign companies operating in the country.

Anyway hope it al works out. Thanks for everyone's advice!
Reply
#19
I'm still trying to update my English resume (getting guidance from the recruiter at work), then translating it. I posted on a local Chicago Japanese forum and they provided the websites below. Maybe others can use the additional resources.

http://www.b-cause.co.jp/
http://www.japan-career.jp/
https://nextinjapan.com/
Reply
#20
Well my company was just acquired by Salesforce, so... Japan here I come? Maybe. Hopefully.
Reply
#21
More than likely it's pushed your chances of an internal transfer out by a few years. Salesforce is a huge company, you have to figure there are more people wanting to go to Japan in Salesforce than there was when your company was smaller. I'd talk to the new HR when stuff gets set up and find out.
Reply
#22
(2015-12-24, 9:36 am)vix86 Wrote: More than likely it's pushed your chances of an internal transfer out by a few years. Salesforce is a huge company, you have to figure there are more people wanting to go to Japan in Salesforce than there was when your company was smaller. I'd talk to the new HR when stuff gets set up and find out.

Sure it's not confirmed but at least within my company I was the only one who wanted to go. It'd be a great opportunity for us to introduce our software into the Japanese market, and from the announcement yesterday it sounds like Salesforce has some internal tracks to pursue things in other countries (they explicitly mentioned Japan so I danced for a bit). I take it as a win-win. Think about it... going from a company with no presence in Japan, which would have still taken at least a good chunk of time incorporating a KK or whatever it is, etc etc, to working for a company where I can simply put in my request to go.

Are there lots of people at SFDC who want to go? Maybe. Are there lots of people at my particular company within Salesforce who want to go? No, just me. So I have that going for me if they introduce our software into that market.

Worst that happens is I leave and as planned several months later if I see no movement on Japan, and start applying for Japanese companies myself. There will of course be HR stuff happening next month so we'll see. Nobody really knows yet but I'm more excited than anything.
Reply
#23
Good luck! I've been keeping an eye on this thread for more resources to help with my job search as well. Hopefully we both are able to make it over there soon-ish.
Reply
#24
(2015-12-24, 10:52 am)TheVinster Wrote: It'd be a great opportunity for us to introduce our software into the Japanese market, and from the announcement yesterday it sounds like Salesforce has some internal tracks to pursue things in other countries (they explicitly mentioned Japan so I danced for a bit).

I've got a Japanese colleague living abroad that did 就職活動 in Japan over the summer and will start working for Salesforce in Tokyo from April onwards. You'll probably know more, but to me this indicates that they already have some presence in Japan.

At the risk of derailing this thread slightly, I'm currently also thinking about my professional future seeing as I graduated this month. I've come acrosse this position that would be a really good match to my skills and interests. What makes me somewhat hesitant though is that when I was in Japan, I had the impression that there's an almost unsurmountable barrier between people that went to Japan on their own hand, and expats that got sent there by their companies in terms of treatment. Given that, I figured it'd make sense to start at HQ and then get transfered later. Any opinions on that? I'm not overly motivated by money (and am also considering a PhD), but seeing some of the expat packages really makes me think twice.
Reply
#25
(2015-12-24, 9:36 am)vix86 Wrote: More than likely it's pushed your chances of an internal transfer out by a few years. Salesforce is a huge company, you have to figure there are more people wanting to go to Japan in Salesforce than there was when your company was smaller. I'd talk to the new HR when stuff gets set up and find out.

I think it opens up a lot more opportunity. Salesforce already has a presence there with some significant Japanese clients, such as Japan Post. 

Vinster, I'd recommend starting to network with anyone in SFDC Japan as soon as you can. The more people you know and the more of a name you make for yourself over there, the easier it will be to transfer in the long run. Your language skills, IMO, give you a huge edge: there are so few people stateside who speak Japanese that you should be able to find ways to make yourself a valuable asset to the Japanese business. 

In my case, I joined a Training & Certification team at a large company a couple of years ago, and was lucky that at the time we had a sizable Japanese branch. I made it known that I was studying Japanese, and as a result I've been able to help out the Japanese team with things like content reviews, debriefing sessions on our training offerings, and interviews of new trainers. I'm working now with an American mentor who lives in Tokyo on doing some trainings at the Meguro office so that I can do some extended networking outside of my division.
Reply